Epson 486SX User`s guide Download

Transcript
FCC COMPLIANCE STATEMENT FOR AMERICAN USERS
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a class B digital
device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential installation. This
equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and
used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio or
television reception. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a
particular installation. If this equipment does cause interference to radio and television
reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
0 Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna
Cl Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver
0 Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected
0 Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
WARNING
The connection of a non-shielded equipment interface cable to this equipment will
invalidate the FCC Certification of this device and may cause interference levels which
exceed the limits established by the FCC for this equipment. It is the responsibility of the
user to obtain and use a shielded equipment interface cable with this device. If this
equipment has more than one interface connector, do not leave cables connected to unused
interfaces.
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the manufacturer could void the
user’s authority to operate the equipment.
FOR CANADIAN USERS
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emissions from
digital apparatus as set out in the radio interference regulations of the Canadian
Department of Communications.
Le present appareil numerique n’emet pas de bruits radioelectriques depassant les limites
applicables aux appareils numeriques de Classe B prescrites dans le reglement sur le
brouillage radidlectrique edict6 par le Ministere des Communications du Canada.
EPSON®
User’s Guide
IMPORTANT NOTICE
DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTY
Epson America makes no representations or warranties, either express or implied, by or
with respect to anything in this manual, and shall not be liable for any implied warranties
of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose or for any indirect, special, or
consequential damages. Some states do not allow the exclusion of incidental or
consequential damages, so this exclusion may not apply to you.
COPYRIGHT NOTICE
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval
system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Epson
America, Inc. No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of information
contained herein. Nor is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of the
information contained herein. Further, this publication and features described herein are
subject to change without notice.
TRADEMARKS
Epson is a registered trademark of Seiko Epson Corporation.
Equity is a registered trademark of Epson America, Inc.
General notice: Other product names used herein are for identification purposes only and
may be trademarks of their respective companies.
Copyright 0 1992 by Epson America, Inc.
Torrance, California
ii
Y73899110100
Important Safety Instructions
1.
Read all of these instructions and save them for later reference.
2.
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the product.
3.
Unplug this product from the wall outlet before cleaning. Use a
damp cloth for cleaning, not liquid cleaners or aerosol cleaners.
4.
Do not use this product near water.
5.
Do not place this product on an unstable cart, stand, or table.
6.
Slots and openings in the cabinet and the back or bottom are
provided for ventilation; these openings must not be blocked or
covered. This product should never be placed near or over a
radiator or heat register.
7.
This product should be operated from the type of power source
indicated on the marking label. If you are not sure of the type of
power available, consult your dealer or local power company.
8.
Connect all equipment to properly grounded (earthed) power
outlets. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet,
contact your electrician to replace your obsolete outlet. Avoid
using outlets on the same circuit as photocopiers or air control
systems that regularly switch on and off.
9.
Do not locate this product where the cord will be walked on.
10. If an extension cord is used with this product, make sure that the
total of the ampere ratings on the products plugged into the
extension cord do not exceed the extension cord ampere rating.
Also, make sure that the total of all products plugged into the
wall outlet does not exceed 15 amperes.
11. Never push objects of any kind into this product through the
cabinet slots. Never spill liquid of any kind on the product.
iii
12. Except as specifically explained in the User’s Guide, do not
attempt to service this product yourself. Refer all servicing to
qualified service personnel.
13. Unplug this product from the wall outlet and refer servicing to
qualified service personnel under the following conditions:
A. When the power cord or plug is damaged.
B. If liquid has entered the product.
C. If the product does not operate normally when the operating
instructions are followed. Adjust only those controls that are
covered by the operating instructions, since improper
adjustment of other controls may result in damage and will
often require extensive work by a qualified technician to
restore the product to normal operation.
D. If the product has been dropped or the cabinet has been
damaged.
E. If the product exhibits a distinct change in performance.
iv
Importantes Mesures de S&wit6
V
vi
Contents
Introduction
Optional Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Systems and Other Software . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VGA Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Use This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where to Get Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 1
Setting Up Your System
1 Choosing a Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2 Removing the Protector Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3 Connecting a Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the VGA Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a Display Adapter Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4 Connecting a Printer or Other Device . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Parallel Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Serial Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5 Connecting the Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6 Connecting the Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7 Connecting the Power Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
8 Turning On the Computer
Turning Off the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 2
2
2
3
3
5
1-1
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-7
1-7
1-9
1-10
1-11
1-13
1-14
1-16
Running the Setup Program
Automatic Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Continuing From an Error Message . . . . . . . . . . . .
Moving the Cursor Block . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-2
2-2
2-4
2-5
vii
Setting the Display Adapter Type . . . . . . .
Setting the Power-on Password . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Extended Memory Caching . . . .
Setting the Processor Speed . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Keyboard and Speaker Options . .
Setting the Real-time Clock . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Hard Disk Drive Configuration . .
Hard Disk Drive Types . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Diskette Drive Type(s) . . . . . . .
Setting the Serial/Parallel Interfaces . . . . . .
Reviewing Your Settings . . . . . . . . . . . .
Leaving the Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . 2-6
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2-9
2-11
2-13
2-15
2-17
2-20
2-23
2-27
2-28
2-30
2-32
Installing MS-DOS or Another Operating System . . . . . . . .
Copying the Reference and Utility Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Locking the Computer’s Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Special Keys on the Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stopping a Command or Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resetting the Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using a Power-on Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing a Power-on Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deleting a Power-on Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing the Hard Disk for Moving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-10
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
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Using Your Computer
Enhancing System Operations
Using AUTOEXEC.BAT and Other Batch Files . . . . .
Changing the Processor Speed . . . . . . . . . . .
Entering Keyboard Commands . . . . . . . .
Using the ESPEED Program . . . . . . . . . .
Reassigning the Diskette Drives . . . . . . . . . .
Using the AFDD Program . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Your Computer as a Network Server . . . .
Using a Password in Network Server Mode .
viii
.
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
4-1
4-2
4-4
4-5
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-11
Using Expanded Memory Beyond 640KB . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Special VGA Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 5
Accessing Internal Components
Special Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Subassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing the Subassembly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing the Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Replacing the Cover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Post-installation Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 6
5-1
5-2
5-4
5-6
5-8
5-10
5-11
5-12
Installing and Removing Options
Main System Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Option Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing an Option Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Memory Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 7
4-12
4-13
6-3
6-4
6-7
6-8
6-10
6-12
6-13
6-14
Installing and Removing Drives
Using the Correct Drive Bay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the IDE Hard Disk Drive Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Jumper Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing or Removing a Drive in the External Bay . . . . . . .
Installing a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing or Removing a Drive in the Internal Bay . . . . . . .
Removing a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5
7-6
7-12
7-14
7-15
ix
Installing a Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Connecting the Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix A
7-17
7-18
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
Choosing the Type of Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Formatting a New Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Reformatting a Used Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting an Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the Formatting Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 1, Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the Defective Track Table . . . . . . . . . . . .
Formatting the Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 2, Destructive Surface Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option 3, Non-destructive Surface Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exiting the Hard Disk Format Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-4
A-4
A-5
A-7
A-8
A-9
A-11
A-13
Appendix B Troubleshooting
Identifying Your System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Computer Won’t Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Computer Does Not Respond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Restoring the Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Password Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting a New Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitor Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diskette Drive Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hard Disk Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing the Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preparing the Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing Data on the Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
X
B-1
B-2
B-5
B-6
B-9
B-10
B-11
B-13
B-14
B-15
B-17
B-19
B-20
B-20
B-21
B-22
B-23
Printer Problems . . . . . . . . .
Option Card Problems . . . . .
Mouse Problems . . . . . . . . .
Using the MOUSE7PT.EXE
Memory Module Problems . . .
Math Coprocessor Problems . .
Appendix C
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Program . . . . . . . . . . . .
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B-24
B-26
B-27
B-27
B-29
B-30
Performing System Diagnostics
Starting System Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting an Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Modifying the Device List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resuming From an Error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-2
C-4
C-5
C-7
C-8
C-11
Appendix D Specifications
CPU and Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controllers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mass Storage Bays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Source Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Physical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Memory Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D-1
D-2
D-2
D-3
D-4
D-4
D-5
D-6
D-6
D-7
Glossary
Index
xi
Introduction
You’ve chosen a powerful, versatile [email protected] computer, ideally
suited for use in a network or as a high-performance personal
workstation.
Whether you have the 25 MHz model or the 50 MHz model
(with built-in math coprocessor), your system includes 4MB of
internal memory, a built-in VGA display adapter, built-in
parallel and serial interfaces, and an IBM® PS/2™ compatible
mouse port. These interfaces allow you to connect most of your
peripheral devices directly to the computer.
Note
The 25 MHz model has an 80486SX microprocessor and the
50 MHz model has an 80486DX2/50 microprocessor. The
instructions in this manual refer to both models, except
where specified.
Your computer has six option slots (five 16-bit and one 8-bit)
for installing additional devices, such as a modem or a network
card. Additionally, the computer supports up to five drives:
three externally-accessible drives and two internal drives.
Your computer offers several other outstanding features:
CI
Memory caching copies portions of your system memory
into a high-speed cache buffer so your computer can access
programs and data very quickly.
Ll
Shadow RAM copies your system and video ROM into the
computer’s 32-bit RAM to further accelerate performance.
Ll
The built-in VGA adapter and VGA drivers support
extended graphics resolutions up to 1024 x 768 in 16 colors
or 640 x 480 in 256 colors on compatible monitors.
Introduction 1
Optional Equipment
You can easily upgrade your computer by installing additional
memory and adding just about any optional device that is
compatible with the IBM Personal Computer, PC XT,TM or
PC AT®.
By adding memory modules to the memory card, you can
expand the computer’s memory up to 16MB.
If you have the 25 MHz model and want to speed up
mathematical calculations in certain application programs,
you can have your computer’s 80486SX microprocessor chip
replaced with an 80487SX, 25 MHz chip. This optional
microprocessor includes a built-in math coprocessor.
Check with your authorized Epson dealer for information on
optional equipment.
Operating Systems and Other Software
You probably chose a version of [email protected] to use with your
computer. However, you can run another operating system,
such as OS/2, UNIX®, or XENIX®.
Note
This manual covers basic operating instructions for using
your computer, but does not explain how to install or use the
operating system. See your MS-DOS or other operating
system manuals for comprehensive instructions.
You can use virtually any application program designed for the
IBM PC, PC XT, PC AT, or compatible computers. You can also
use powerful 32-bit software, such as Microsoft WindowsTM 3.0
(or later), with your computer.
2 Introduction
VGA Utilities
Epson has included special VGA device drivers and utilities for
use with your built-in VGA adapter. With these utilities, you
can take advantage of extended VGA features such as 16-color
graphics mode resolutions up to 1024 x 768 (non-interlaced),
256-color resolutions up to 640 x 480, and 132-column text
mode. The VGA device drivers and utilities are described in the
VGA Utilities booklet that came with your system.
How to Use This Manual
This manual explains how to set up and operate your
computer, install options, and run diagnostic checks. You do
not need to read everything in this book to use your computer;
see the following chapter summaries to find the sections you
need.
Chapter 1 provides simple step-by-step instructions for setting
up your system.
Chapter 2 describes how to run the Setup program to define
your computer’s configuration. Do this before you use your
computer. You may need to run it again later, if you change the
configuration.
Chapter 3 provides instructions for general operating
procedures, such as locking the computer’s cover and copying
files.
Chapter 4 describes special features you can use to enhance
your system’s performance.
Chapter 5 tells you how to remove and replace the computer’s
cover, front panel, and subassembly to access components
inside the computer.
Introduction 3
Chapter 6 describes some of the options you can use in your
computer and contains instructions for setting jumpers and
installing various options.
Chapter 7 explains how to install and remove disk drives.
Appendix A describes how to perform a low-level format on a
hard disk.
Appendix B contains troubleshooting tips.
Appendix C covers the system diagnostic tests you can run to
diagnose hardware problems.
Appendix D contains the specifications for your computer.
At the end of the manual, you’ll find a glossary and an index.
4
Introduction
Where to Get Help
If you purchased your Epson product in the United States,
Epson America provides local customer support and service
through a nationwide network of authorized Epson dealers and
Service Centers.
Epson also provides the following support services through the
Epson Customer Resource Center at (800) 922-8911:
cl
Technical assistance with the installation, configuration,
and operation of Epson products
cl
Assistance in locating your nearest Authorized Epson
Reseller or Service Center
ci
Sales of ribbons, supplies, parts, documentation, and
accessories for your Epson product
cl
Customer Relations
CI
Epson technical information library fax service
cl
Product literature with technical specifications on our
current and new products.
If you purchased your computer outside of the United States,
please contact your dealer or the marketing location nearest
you for customer support and service. International marketing
locations are listed on the inside of this manual’s back cover.
Introduction 5
Chapter 1
Setting Up Your System
Setting up your Epson personal computer is easy. Just follow
the eight steps in this chapter. You may want to leave this
manual’s back cover foldout open so you can refer to the
illustrations identifying the different parts.
Before you begin, make sure your computer is turned off by
pressing the power button on the right side of the front panel.
It is off when the button pops out.
7
Choosing a Location
Setting Up
Your
System
1-1
Before you set up your computer, it’s important to choose a
safe, convenient location that provides the following:
A sturdy desk or table strong enough to support the weight
of your system and all of its components.
A flat, hard surface. Soft surfaces like beds and carpeted
floors attract static electricity, which can erase data on your
disks, damage the computer’s circuitry, and prevent proper
ventilation.
Good air circulation. Leave several inches of space around
the computer so air can move freely.
Moderate environmental conditions. Select a cool, dry area
and protect your computer from extremes in temperature,
humidity, dust, and smoke. Avoid direct sunlight or any
other source of heat.
Appropriate power sources. Connect all your equipment to
the appropriate power source. (See “Power Source
Requirements” in Appendix D for more information.) You
need one outlet for the computer, one for the monitor, and
additional outlets for a printer and any other peripheral
devices.
cl
1-2
No electromagnetic interference. Do not place your system
too close to any electrical device, such as a telephone, which
generates an electromagnetic field.
Setting Up
Your
System
2
Removing the Protector Card
If you have a 544inch diskette drive, a protector card has been
inserted in the diskette slot at the factory to protect the drive’s
read/write heads. To remove it, either flip up the latch or press
the release button to pop the card out part way. Then pull it all
the way out.
Save any protector cards you remove; you may want to reinsert
them later, if you transport your computer.
3
Connecting a Monitor
If you have a VGA monitor (or a multi-frequency monitor with
an analog connector), you can connect it to the computer’s
built-in VGA port. See “Using the VGA Interface,” below. If
you have any other type of monitor, skip to “Using a Display
Adapter Card,” below.
Setting Up Your System
1-3
Using the VGA Interface
Follow these steps to connect your VGA monitor to the VGA
port on the computer:
1. Make sure your monitor and computer are turned off.
1-4
2.
Place your monitor on top of or near the computer. For easy
access, turn the monitor and computer around so the backs
of both components are facing you.
3.
If necessary, connect the monitor cable to the monitor.
(Your monitor may have a permanently attached cable.)
4.
Examine the connector end of the monitor cable, and position
the plug to match the orientation of the monitor port
(marked with a monitor icon). Then insert the plug into the
port, as shown below.
Setting Up
Your
System
Caution
To avoid damaging the connector, take care not to bend
the pins when you insert the plug.
5.
If the connector has retaining screws, be sure to tighten them.
6.
Plug the monitor power cord into the monitor’s power inlet,
as shown below.
7.
Plug the other end of the power cord into a properly
grounded (earthed) electrical outlet.
Setting Up Your System
1-5
Using a Display Adapter Card
If you are using a non-VGA monitor, you’ll need to install a
display adapter (video) card in one of the computer’s option
slots before you can connect the monitor. (Your dealer may
have already installed the video card for you.)
If the video card is not installed, follow the instructions in
Chapter 6 to install an option card. But first, check the
following table to make sure your display adapter card and
monitor are properly matched.
Monitor/video card compatibility
Monitor
Video card
Monochrome
Monochrome display adapter (MDA)
Multi-mode graphics adapter (MGA)
Enhanced graphics adapter (EGA)
Hercules’ graphics card
CGA
Color graphics adapter (CGA)
Multi-mode graphics adapter (MGA)
Enhanced graphics adapter (EGA)
EGA
Enhanced graphics adapter (EGA)
Monochrome or color VGA
Video graphics array (VGA)
Extended VGA
Super VGA adapter
switches or jumpers on the card are set properly. For example,
you may need to change a setting to select color or
monochrome. See the documentation that came with your
monitor or video card for instructions.
If you install an EGA or VGA display adapter card or if you
install another type of card that you want to be the primary
display adapter, you must set jumper JP4 on the main system
board to disable the built-in VGA interface.
1-6
Setting Up Your System
If you install one or more cards, you also may need to set
jumper JP6 to tell the computer the type of monitor you are
using: monochrome or color. If you have two types of cards, set
the jumper to indicate which one is your primary monitor type.
See Chapter 6 for instructions on changing jumper settings.
Once you have installed your video card, return to this section
to connect your monitor to the computer. Follow the steps in
“Using the VGA Interface” on page 1-4, but insert your monitor
connector into the video card port instead of the built-in VGA
port.
4
Connecting a Printer or Other Device
Your computer has both parallel and serial interfaces. To
connect a printer or other peripheral device to one of these
interfaces, follow the instructions below. Epson offers a full
range of printers; ask your dealer for more information.
Using the Parallel Interface
The parallel interface on your computer is Centronics®
compatible and uses a DB-25S connector.
To connect your printer and computer, you need an IBM
compatible printer cable. If you are not sure which one you
need, check with your Epson dealer.
Once you have the correct printer cable, follow these steps:
1.
Make sure the printer and your computer are turned off.
2.
Place the printer next to the computer with the back panels
of both components facing you.
Setting Up Your System
1-7
3.
4.
1-8
One end of the printer cable has a 25-pin, D-shell connector.
Position the plug to match the orientation of the parallel
port (marked with a special icon); then insert it into the
port, as shown below. If the plug has retaining screws, be
sure to tighten them.
Connect the other end of the cable to the printer, as shown
below. To secure the cable, squeeze the clips at each side of
the printer port.
Setting Up Your System
5.
Plug the printer’s power cord into a properly grounded
(earthed) electrical outlet.
Using the Serial Interface
If you have a printer, a modem, or other peripheral device with
a serial interface, you can connect it to the serial (RS-232C) port
on the back of the computer.
The serial port has a DB-9P connector, so be sure you have a
compatible cable. To connect a serial device, follow the same
steps as above for connecting a parallel device, but insert the
connector into the serial port, marked with a special icon, as
shown below.
Note
Additional steps may be necessary to set up the serial port so
it functions properly. If you are using the port for a printer,
you need to direct printer output to the serial port, not the
parallel port. To do this, you can use the MS-DOS MODE or
SETMODE command. See your MS-DOS manual for details.
Setting Up Your System
1-9
5
Connecting the Keyboard
Follow these steps to connect the keyboard:
1. Make sure the computer is turned off.
2.
Hold the keyboard cable connector so the arrow indicator on
the housing faces up. Insert the connector into the port
marked with the keyboard icon, as shown below.
Caution
Although the connectors and ports for the keyboard and
mouse are physically identical, they cannot be used
interchangeably. Be sure to plug the keyboard only into
the keyboard port.
1-10
Setting Up Your System
3.
You can raise the keyboard by adjusting the legs on the
bottom. To change the angle of the keyboard, turn it over
and flip each leg upward until it locks into place, as shown
below.
recessed tab
If you want to lower the keyboard, press down on the
recessed tab (labelled L or R) and lower the leg into the slot.
6
Connecting the Mouse
Your computer has an auxiliary port for an IBM PS/2
compatible mouse that uses a miniature DIN (6-pin) connector.
If your mouse has this type of connector, you can connect it to
the built-in port on your computer.
Note
If you have a mouse that requires a different interface port,
you can connect it to the built-in serial port or install an
option card to provide the interface. You also need to change
the setting of jumper JP7 inside the computer. See Chapter 6
for instructions or ask your dealer for assistance.
Setting Up Your System
1-11
Follow these steps to connect a mouse:
1. Make sure the computer is turned off.
2.
Hold the mouse connector so it is oriented properly with its
port (marked with a mouse icon). Insert the connector as
shown below.
interchangeably. Be sure to plug the mouse only into the
3.
1-12
After you connect a mouse, you may need to add
commands to your MS-DOS CONFIG.SYS file to enable
your computer to use it. See your MS-DOS and mouse
manuals for instructions.
Setting Up Your System
7 Connecting the Power Cord
Follow these steps to connect the power cord:
1.
Plug the power cord into the AC power inlet on the back
panel, as shown below.
WARNING
To avoid an electric shock, be sure to plug the cord into
the computer before plugging it into the electrical outlet.
2.
Plug the other end of the power cord into a properly
grounded (earthed) electrical outlet.
Setting Up Your System
1-23
8
Turning On the Computer
After you set up your system, you’re ready to turn on the
power. But first, read the following safety rules to avoid
accidentally damaging your computer or injuring yourself:
Do not connect or disconnect any peripheral device or
power cables when the computer’s power is on.
Never turn on the computer with a protector card in a
diskette drive.
Never turn off or reset your computer while a disk drive
light is on. This can destroy data stored on the disk.
Always wait at least five seconds after you turn off the
power before you turn it on again. This allows the
computer to clear and reset its memory.
Do not leave a beverage on top of or next to your computer
or any of its components. Spilled liquid can damage the
circuitry of your equipment.
Always turn off the power, disconnect the computer’s
power cord, and wait 30 seconds before you remove the
cover. Only remove the cover to access internal devices.
Follow these steps to turn on your system:
1-14
1.
Make sure the power cord is plugged into the power inlet
on the back panel of the computer and into a properly
grounded (earthed) electrical outlet.
2.
Place your system components in an arrangement that suits
you. (See step 1, “Choosing a Location,” for a typical setup.)
3.
Turn on the monitor, printer, and any other peripheral
devices connected to the computer.
Setting Up Your System
4.
To turn on the computer, press the power button located on
the right side of the front panel, as shown below.
power
The power indicator below the button lights up. After a few
seconds, the computer starts to perform a diagnostic self testa series of checks it completes each time you turn it on to make
sure everything is working correctly.
Note
If you or your dealer have made a major change to your
system, such as adding a disk drive, you may need to wait a
few minutes for your computer to complete power-on
diagnostics the first time you turn it on.
When the system has successfully completed its self test, you
see a prompt to insert a system diskette. (Do not insert a
diskette at this point.)
If necessary, use the controls on your monitor to adjust the
brightness and contrast until characters on the screen are clear
and at a comfortable level of intensity. If your monitor has
horizontal and vertical hold controls, you may need to use
them to stabilize the display.
Setting Up Your System
1-15
Turning Off the Computer
When you are ready to turn off your system, reverse the
sequence of steps you followed to turn it on. Turn off the
computer first, then turn off the monitor and any peripheral
devices.
Now go on to Chapter 2 and follow the instructions to run the
Setup program.
1-16
Setting Up Your System
Chapter 2
Running the Setup Program
The first time you use your computer, you need to run the
Setup program on the Reference diskette to define the
computer’s configuration. You may also need to run it again
later, if you change the configuration.
The Setup program automatically configures parts of your
system and lets you set (or change) the following for your
computer:
Q Display adapter type
U Power-on password
Ll
Extended memory caching
Q Processor speed
Cl
Keyboard and speaker options
Ll
Real-time clock’s time and date
Lt
Hard disk drive configuration
Cl Diskette drive type(s)
Ci
Serial and parallel port settings.
The configuration you define with Setup is stored in the
computer’s CMOS RAM, which is backed up by a battery.
Whenever you turn on the computer, it searches the CMOS
RAM for the correct installation information. If the computer
discovers a difference between the information in the CMOS
RAM and its actual configuration, it prompts you to run the
Setup program.
Running the Setup Program
2-1
Automatic Configuration
Your computer automatically defines your system’s memory
configuration and recognizes whether the CPU chip contains a
math coprocessor. It also detects and configures most of the
devices you have installed in your system. For this reason, you
may not need to change any of the default settings in the Setup
program. However, you should check each of the options on
the Setup menu to verify that the settings are correct for your
configuration.
The computer automatically configures the 4MB of memory
that comes with your system as 640KB of base memory and
3072KB of extended memory. If you install even more memory,
Setup configures it as extended memory also.
Note
To run certain application programs, you may need to
reduce the amount of base memory from 640KB to 512KB or
256KB. Check the documentation that came with your
software to see if this is necessary. If you do need to change
the amount of base memory, you must set jumpers on the
computer’s main system board. See “Changing the Jumper
Settings” in Chapter 6 for instructions.
Starting the Setup Program
Follow these steps to start the Setup program:
2-2
1.
Make sure your computer is turned off.
2.
Insert the Reference diskette in drive A. (If you have a
3%inch drive, the diskette clicks into place automatically.
If you have a 5V4-inch drive, press the button to secure the
diskette in the drive after you insert it.)
Running the Setup Program
3.
Turn on your system. (Remember to turn on your monitor
and any peripheral devices before you turn on the
computer.) The screen displays the Operation Menu:
OPERATION MENU
1 - Setup
2 - Format hard disk
3 - System diagnostics
4 - Prepare hard disk for moving
0 - Exit to DOS for more utilities
If an error message appears when you turn on the
computer, see “Continuing From an Error Message,” below.
4.
The Setup option is highlighted. To select it, press CEnter
The screen displays the main Setup menu:
Exit
Display
Password
Cache memory
Processor speed
Keyboard/Sound
Real-time clock
Hard disk drive
Diskette drive
Serial/Parallel
Running the Setup Program
2-3
Continuing From an Error Message
If your computer has never been set up, you may see an error
message, such as the following:
162 - System options not set
(Run SETUP in REFERENCE DISK)
(Resume = "F1" key)
If you see an error message like this one, follow these steps:
1. Press I. The computer beeps and the screen displays a
message, such as the following:
Error(s) detected
l
Incorrect configuration
Set default value ? ( Y / N )
The error message next to the diamond indicates the
condition causing the error. There may be more than one
error listed in the message. Here are some of the error
messages you may see:
Time is invalid
HDD and/or HDC failed initialization
Memory size is incorrect, correction made
Cacheable range is adjusted
Incorrect configuration
Checksum is incorrect
HDD is incorrect
Some errors, such as Time is invalid, do not allow you
to set a default value, so the screen does not display the
Set default value prompt. If you see one of these
errors, press I; the screen displays the main Setup
menu so you can enter a new setting.
2-4
Running the Setup Program
2.
Be sure Y is highlighted and press IEnter The Setup
program changes the setting that caused the error to one
that is more likely to match your configuration. The screen
displays the main Setup menu:
Exit
Display
Password
Cache memory
Processor speed
Keyboard/Sound
Real-time clock
Hard disk drive
Diskette drive
Serial/Parallel
You should check all the settings in the Setup program to
make sure they are correct for your system. The default
value for the setting that caused the error may not be the
correct one for your configuration.
Note
If you choose N or press m instead of selecting Y to
set a default value, the Setup program does not change
the setting that caused the error and the screen displays
the main Setup menu. Be sure to correct this setting
before you exit Setup.
Running the Setup Program
2-5
Moving the Cursor Block
Use 1 and 1‘ to move the cursor block (the highlighted bar)
through the options on the main Setup menu. After you
highlight the option you want, press [Enter to select it.
Note
If the arrow keys on the numeric keypad do not appear to
work, num lock mode may be enabled (turned on). If the
Num Lock indicator in the upper right corner of the keyboard
is lit, press 1-1 once to turn it off and enable the arrow
keys on the numeric keypad. If you need to enter numbers
while using the Setup program and you want to use the
numeric keypad, press [G] to turn it back on.
Follow the instructions in the rest of this chapter to use the
Setup program to define your computer’s configuration.
Setting the Display Adapter Type
The Setup program can usually detect the exact type of display
adapter you are using with your computer. If you have
connected a VGA monitor to the built-in VGA port, the Setup
program automatically sets the display adapter type. (With
this option you select the type of display adapter you are
using-not the type of monitor.) If you have installed a display
adapter card-or you just want to check the display adapter
setting-follow these steps.
2-6
Running the Setup Program
Note
If you have installed an EGA or VGA display adapter card,
or another type of card that you want to be the primary
display adapter, you must set jumper JP4 on the main
system board to disable the built-in VGA interface.
If you have installed one or more video cards, you also may
need to set jumper JP6 to tell the computer the type of
monitor you are using: either monochrome or color. If you
have two types of cards, set the jumper to indicate which one
is your primary monitor type. See Chapter 6 for instructions
on changing jumper settings.
1.
At the main Setup menu, highlight Display. A submenu
appears identifying the current display adapter type, such
as the following:
VGA
If the display adapter type is correct for your system, you
can skip the rest of this section.
2.
To change the display adapter setting, press (Enter. The
cursor block moves into the submenu and you see an
additional menu on the right side:
40 column
CGA
CGA
80 column
Monochrome 80 column
EGA,MCGA,VGA or other
Running the Setup Program
2-7
3.
Press m to move the cursor block into this submenu
and then use I’ or 1 to highlight the option that matches
your display adapter type. If you are not sure which one
to choose, follow these guidelines:
tl
If you are using the built-in VGA adapter or have
installed a VGA, EGA, or MCGA card, select EGA,
MCGA,VGA or other.
tl
If you have a color graphics adapter (CGA) or a
multi-mode graphics adapter (MGA) attached to an
RGB (color) monitor, select CGA 80 column. (Also set
the color/mono switch on the MGA card to color.)
LI
If you have a composite color monitor, such as a
color television with a video input, try selecting
CGA 80 column. If the resulting resolution is poor,
run Setup again and select CGA 40 column.
tl
If you have a monochrome display adapter (MDA), an
MGA, or a Hercules MGA attached to a monochrome
monitor, choose Monochrome 80 column. (Also set
the color/mono switch on the MGA card to mono.)
tl
If you have any other combination of monitor and
display adapter card, select EGA, MCGA, VGA o r
other. In addition, consult the documentation
supplied with your display adapter card.
Note
If you have two different display adapters, select the
setting for the one you want to be your primary display
adapter. The other one is your secondary adapter. A
message appears at power-on telling you whether you
are currently using your primary or secondary adapter.
2-8
Running the Setup Program
4.
After you highlight the appropriate display adapter type,
press IEnter The screen displays your new setting.
5. Highlight *** SAVE SETTING *** and press CEnter] to
return to the main Setup menu.
Setting the Power-on Password
A power-on password is an optional feature that lets you
control who can access your system. If you do not want to set a
password, skip this section.
Once you set a power-on password, you must enter it at the
key prompt ( h ) every time you turn on or reset your
computer. If you do not enter it correctly, you cannot access
your system.
If you want to use your computer as a network server, you can
set your password to operate in network server mode. (See
“Using Your Computer as a Network Server” in Chapter 4 for
more information.)
Follow these steps to set a power-on password and turn on
network server mode (if necessary):
1. At the main Setup menu, highlight Password. This
submenu appears:
Power-on password
Network server mode OFF
2.
Press IEnter The cursor block moves to Power-on
password.
3.
Press IEnter The cursor block moves to an empty box.
Running the Setup Program
2-9
Note
If a password already exists, this message appears:
Power-on password already installed
The Setup program does not allow you to enter a new
password if you have already set one. However, you can
easily change or delete the current password if you
know it. See “Using a Power-on Password” in Chapter 3
for instructions.
4.
To enter a password, type any combination of characters
(including letters, numbers, and blank spaces) up to a total
of seven characters. You can use the backspace key to delete
mistakes.
Do not use characters requiring the m key, such as $, @,
or * in your password. The computer does not recognize
the m key when you use your password to access the
system.
Caution
Be sure to remember the password you enter or write it
down and keep it in a safe place. If you cannot
remember your password, you will not be able to access
the computer the next time you turn it on.
If you want to return to the password submenu without
saving any changes, press I.
5.
2-10
After you enter a password, press [Enter] to return to the
password submenu.
Running the Setup Program
6.
If you want to change the network server mode setting,
highlight Network server mode. To turn network
server mode on or off, press w).
You must set a power-on password to turn on network
server mode. If you did not yet enter a password, this
message appears:
Set a power-on password first
To enter a password, highlight Power-on password and
follow steps 3 through 5 above.
7.
After you enter a password and turn network server mode
on or off, highlight **** SAVE SETTINGS ****and
press w to return to the main Setup menu.
Note
If you forget your password, there is a way to disable the
password function. See “Password Problems” in Appendix B
for instructions.
Setting the Extended Memory Caching
Extended memory caching allows your system to work much
faster. When you cache portions of memory, the computer
copies information from that memory into a high-speed cache
buffer, where it can find information faster.
Note
Caching is active only when your computer is operating at
high speed.
Running the Setup Program
2-11
Your computer automatically enables memory caching for the
640KB of base memory. For the memory above 1MB, the Setup
program allows you to turn extended memory caching on or
off. The default setting is on for all the extended memory
currently installed in your system from 1MB up to the
maximum.
Most of the time, you should cache all of your extended
memory to maximize the performance of your 32-bit computer.
However, if you install an optional memory card that “shares”
memory with any of your other system memory, you should
turn caching off in memory areas that are shared. See the
manual that came with your memory card to see if this is
necessary.
To check or change the extended memory cache setting, follow
these steps:
1.
At the main Setup menu, highlight Cache memory. You
see the following cache memory table:
Extended memory caching
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15MB+
The table indicates the range of extended memory currently
installed in your system. You see ON or OFF in the first
three areas because your computer comes with 4MB of
memory and the extended memory area from 1MB to 4MB
can be cached. If you installed additional memory, you see
ON or OFF for each additional megabyte of memory you
have installed. The shaded areas indicate ranges of memory
that are not installed.
If your extended memory cache setting is correct, you can
skip the rest of this section.
2-12
Running the Setup Program
2.
To change the setting, press m. The cursor block
moves to Extended memory caching.
3.
Press m again. The cursor block moves to the first
range in the cache table. To change the setting for the first
range from ON to OFF or vice versa, press (Enter.
4.
If you installed memory above 4MB, press + three times to
move the cursor block to the 4MB to 5MB range. Press
m to change the setting from ON to OFF, if necessary.
Then press + or t to move to the other ranges and press
IEnter as necessary, to change the settings.
5.
When you are finished, press 1‘ to move the cursor block to
the submenu.
6.
Highlight * ** SAVE SETTING ** * and press w to
return to the Setup menu.
Setting the Processor Speed
Your computer’s processor can operate at two speeds: high or
low. High speed is 25 MHz or 50 MHz (depending on your
model) and low speed simulates 8 MHz. The processor is set to
operate at high speed (where it can access memory faster)
unless you change it to low or set the speed to change
automatically (when necessary).
When the computer is running at high speed, the TURBO
indicator on the front panel is illuminated.
You should use high speed for almost everything you do unless
you are using an application program that requires a slower
speed. Some programs (especially older ones) have specific
timing requirements when accessing diskettes. Check your
application program manual.
Running the Setup Program
2-13
You can also set the processor to change its speed
automatically. This enables the computer to switch to low
speed whenever it needs to access a diskette drive, but run at
high speed for all other operations.
Note
You may not want to use the automatic setting for certain
copy-protected programs. See “Changing the Processor
Speed” in Chapter 4 for more information.
In addition to selecting the default operating speed through
the Setup program, you can change the speed temporarily by
entering a keyboard command or running the ESPEED
program. See “Changing the Processor Speed” in Chapter 4
for details.
Follow these steps to set your processor speed:
1. At the main Setup menu, highlight Processor speed.
The current status appears:
Speed: High
If the displayed setting is correct, skip the rest of this
section.
2.
To change the processor speed, press IEnter The cursor
moves into the submenu and you see another menu:
High
Automatic
Low
2-14
Running the Setup Program
3.
Press [Enter] to move the cursor block into the option
menu.
4.
Use ? or 1 to highlight the speed you want and press
IEnter
5. Highlight ** SAVE SETTING ** and press m to return
to the main Setup menu.
Setting the Keyboard and Speaker Options
The Keyboard/Sound option lets you control these three
features:
Ci Speaker
tl
Initial num lock mode
Cl Keyboard repeat rate.
Your computer has a built-in speaker that beeps when you
perform certain operations. The default setting is Enabled (on)
since it serves a useful purpose in many applications; however,
you may prefer to disable the speaker.
The Initial num lock option determines whether num
lock is on or off when you turn on your computer. When num
lock mode is on, you can use the numeric keys on the keypad to
enter numbers.
To turn num lock mode off, just press IsLock. The Num Lock
light on the keyboard goes out and the feature is disabled until
you turn the computer off or until you press [-Lock again. The
next time you turn on your computer, num lock returns to the
setting you selected in the Setup program.
Running the Setup Program
2-15
Note
If you are using the keyboard that came with your computer
(or another IBM AT compatible keyboard), the default
setting for the initial num lock setting is ON. If you are using
a keyboard that has 83 or 84 keys, the initial num lock
default setting is OFF.
The keyboard repeat rate option lets you change the speed at
which your keyboard repeats a character when you hold down
a key. The default setting is Normal, but you can make the rate
faster or slower.
Follow these steps to check or change the keyboard and speaker
options:
1.
At the main Setup menu, highlight Keyboard/Sound. The
current settings appear:
Speaker
Initial num lock
KB repeat rate
Enabled
ON
Normal
If the displayed settings are appropriate for you, skip the
rest of this section.
2-16
2.
To change any of the settings, press I. The cursor
block moves into the submenu and the Speaker option is
highlighted.
3.
To enable or disable the speaker (turn it on or off), press
IEnter
4.
To turn the initial num lock setting on or off, highlight
Initial num lock and press m).
Running the Setup Program
5. To change the keyboard repeat rate, highlight
KB repeat rate. You see the following option menu:
Slow
Normal
Fast
6.
Press m to move the cursor block into the menu.
7.
Use ? or 1 to highlight the speed you want and press
IEnter
8. Highlight *** SAVE SETTINGS *** and press @@ to
return to the main Setup menu.
Setting the Real-time Clock
The real-time clock in your computer continuously tracks the
time and date-even when the computer is turned off. The first
time you run Setup, use the Real-time clock option to set
the time and date. You may need to use this option again later
to adjust your clock for daylight savings time. The computer
automatically changes the date for leap years.
You can also change the real-time clock’s time and date with
the MS-DOS TIME and DATE commands. See your MS-DOS
Running the Setup Program
2-17
Follow these steps to set the real-time clock:
1. At the main menu, highlight Real-time clock. If the
time and date have been previously set, the current settings
appear:
Time
Date
09:16:52
03-29-1992
If the time and date are correct, you can skip the rest of this
section.
If the time and date are incorrect, go to step 2 below.
If the time and date have never been set, the submenu
contains a template for you to fill in:
Time
Date
xx:xx:xx
xx-xx-xxxx
2.
Press m to move the cursor block into the submenu.
3.
To set or change the time, press m again. You see this
template:
hh:mm:ss
(“hh” stands for hours, “mm” stands for minutes, and “ss”
stands for seconds.)
4. Using a 24-hour clock, enter the time in the exact format
shown in the box. Type two digits for each part; the Setup
program automatically inserts the colons (:). For example,
to set the time to 1:30 p.m., you would type the following:
133000
2-18
Running the Setup Program
You can use the backspace key to make corrections. When
the time is correct, press [Enter. If you enter an invalid
time-for example, a number greater than 23 for the hours
or greater than 59 for the minutes or seconds-the
computer ignores your entry. Try again.
5.
To set or change the date, highlight Date and press IEnter
You see this template:
mm-dd-yyyy
(“mm” stands for month, “dd” stands for day, and “yyyy”
stands for year.)
6.
Enter the date in the exact format shown in the box. Use
two digits for the month and day and four digits for the
year; the Setup program automatically inserts the hyphens
(-). For example, to set the date for March 29,1992, you
would type the following:
03291992
You can use the backspace key to make corrections. When
the date is correct, press IEnter If you enter an invalid
date-for example, a number greater than 12 for the month
or greater than the number of days in that month-the
computer ignores your entry. Try again.
7.
Press ? once or twice to return to the main Setup menu.
Note
The Setup program automatically saves the time and date
when you press m after typing each one. If you then exit
the Setup program without saving your changes, the new
time and date still take effect.
Running the Setup Program
2-19
Setting the Hard Disk Drive Configuration
If your computer came with a factory-installed hard disk, your
hard disk configuration has already been set and you can skip
this section.
If you installed or removed a hard disk, follow these steps to set
the computer’s hard disk configuration:
1.
At the main menu, highlight Hard disk drive. Your
current settings appear, such as the following:
Drive 1:
Drive 2:
Type 34
None
The Type number indicates the type of hard disk installed
in your computer. See your hard disk documentation for
the correct drive type number or for a list of the drive’s
parameters which you can use to identify the drive type
number. Then consult the Hard disk drive types table on
page 2-24 for a list of the types you can use in your
computer.
The None following Drive 2 : indicates that there is no
second hard disk.
If the displayed settings match your hard disk configuration,
skip the rest of this section.
If a setting is incorrect, or if you want more details about
your hard disk configuration, go to step 2.
2-20
Running the Setup Program
2.
Press IEnter You see a menu such as the following:
Drive
1:
Type
34
Drive 2:
None
Number of cylinders
723
Number of cylinders
Nunher of heads
13
Number of heads
Number of sectors
51
Number of sectors
Precomp. cylinder
OFFFF
Precomp. cylinder
Landing zone
722
Landing zone
Total capacity (MB)
234.06
Total capacity (MB)
The menu lists the settings you can change for each
drive: the number of cylinders, the number of read/write
heads, the number of sectors, the precompensation
cylinder, and the landing zone (the cylinder on which you
park the heads when moving the computer). It also
displays the total storage capacity in megabytes.
3.
If you want to change the settings for drive 1 (which is
drive C on most computers), press IEnter] to highlight
Drive 1:. If you want to change the settings for drive 2,
press m and then + to highlight Drive 2 : .
4.
Press m again. You see this submenu:
None
Type 34
User defined
Running the Setup Program
2-21
5.
If you have disconnected the drive or if the drive does not
exist, highlight None and press [Enter. All the drive settings
revert to 0. Go to step 8.
If your hard disk matches one of the drive types listed in
the Hard disk drive types table, go to step 6.
If your hard disk does not match one of the drive types
listed in the Hard disk drive types table, go to step 7.
6.
Highlight Type and press IEnter The current type number
appears:
Type 34
Now select the drive type number that matches your hard
disk configuration in the Hard disk drive types table.
You can enter the drive type in one of two ways:
Ci
Type the drive type number and press IEnter The
screen displays the new number and settings.
CI
Use the cursor keys to scan through the drive type
numbers. This is a handy way to verify new hard disk
settings before you press B because the settings list
is updated as you display each new type.
After you select the appropriate drive type, press [Enters.
The screen displays the hard disk settings. Go to step 8.
2-22
Running the Setup Program
7.
If your hard disk does not match one of the drive types
listed in the Hard disk drive types table, highlight User
defined and press [Enter. You see the following:
Number of cylinders
000
The same parameter is highlighted on the submenu above.
Enter the correct number of cylinders and press IEnter
The information for Number of cylinders is
automatically updated on the submenu above and you see
the next parameter, Number of heads. Enter the correct
number of read/write heads for the hard disk and press
[Enter.
Follow this same procedure for each remaining item in the
settings list (the number of sectors, the precompensation
cylinder, and the landing zone).
If you enter a parameter incorrectly, press ? or L to
highlight the parameter and then enter it again.
The Setup program does not allow you to enter the total
storage capacity; it calculates the storage capacity based on
what you enter for the number of cylinders, heads, and
sectors.
After you type the landing zone number and press [Enter,
the cursor block returns to the Drive submenu heading.
8.
If you want to change the hard disk type for another drive,
press + or t and return to step 4.
9.
When the hard disk drive settings are correct, press 1‘ to
move the cursor block into the top submenu. Highlight
** SAVE SETTINGS ** and press m to save your
hard disk drive configuration.
Running the Setup Program
2-23
Hard Disk Drive Types
The following table lists the types of hard disk drives you can
use in your computer. Check this table and the documentation
supplied with your hard disk to find the correct type number
for the hard disk drive(s) installed in your computer.
Hard disk drive types
2-24
Running the Setup Program
Hard disk drive types (continued)
Running the Setup Program
2-25
Hard disk drive types (continued)
l
l
2-26
Supported in translate mode.
* With Western Digital ESDI controller.
Running the Setup Program
Setting the Diskette Drive Type(s)
Your system probably came with one factory-installed diskette
drive. If you added a second diskette drive or removed one,
you may need to change the diskette drive settings to match
your configuration. If you haven’t made any changes, you can
verify your drive type settings. Follow these steps:
1.
At the main menu, highlight Diskette drive. The
current settings appear:
Drive A:
Drive B:
1.44 MB
None
If the diskette drive types on the screen match your diskette
drive configuration, you can skip the rest of this section.
2.
To change a setting, press IEnter The cursor block moves into
the diskette drive submenu and you see the following:
Not installed
360 KB drive
720 KB drive (3.5")
1.2 MB drive
1.44 MB drive (3.5")
You also see themessage Selected drive light is ON.
This tells you that the light on the diskette drive currently
selected is on.
3.
If you want to change the drive A settings, make sure
Drive A: is highlighted and press 25
Enter . If you want to
change the drive B settings, highlight Drive B : and press
CEnter The cursor block moves into the submenu.
Running the Setup Program
2-27
4.
selected.
the correct capacity for your diskette
The screen displays the type you
If you want to enter the type for another diskette drive,
return to step 3.
5.
When the diskette drive settings are correct, highlight
** SAVE SETTINGS * * and press I. The cursor
block returns to the main Setup menu and you see the
updated information for drives A and B.
Setting the Serial/Parallel Interfaces
The serial and parallel interfaces in your computer are set to act
as the primary ports. If you have not added an additional serial
or parallel port, you can skip this section.
If you install an option card with its own serial or parallel port,
you may want to designate the built-in port as secondary and
the additional port as primary. The Setup program lets you
designate ports as primary and secondary so there is no conflict
between the built-in port and the additional port. Here are
some guidelines:
2-28
Cl
If you install an option card with a port pre-set as primary
by the manufacturer, you must make the computer’s
built-in port the secondary port.
Cl
If you install an option card or peripheral device with a
port that is not pre-set, you can designate it as the primary
or secondary port.
Li
If you install two option cards with ports, designate one as
the primary port and the other as the secondary port and
disable the built-in port.
Running the Setup Program
Follow these steps to change your built-in serial and parallel
interface settings:
1. At the main menu, highlight Serial/Parallel. The
current settings for each port appear:
Serial
Parallel
2.
Primary
Primary
Press m to move the cursor block into the submenu.
You see this additional option menu:
Disabled
Primary
Secondary
3.
If you want to change the serial port setting, be sure
Serial is highlighted and press IEnter If you want to
change the parallel port setting, highlight Parallel and
press [Enter. The cursor block moves into the submenu.
4.
Use L or 1‘ to highlight the appropriate setting for the port
you selected and press IEnter The screen displays the new
setting.
Note
If you add an option card with a parallel or serial port
and highlight a setting that causes a conflict between
your built-in port and the port on the option card, you
see this message:
Conflict with option card
Running the Setup Program
2-29
If you want to change the setting for the other port, return
to step 3.
5.
When the serial and parallel port settings are correct,
highlight ** * SAVE SETTINGS *** and press IEnter
The cursor block returns to the main Setup menu and you
see your updated serial and parallel interface settings.
Reviewing Your Settings
When you finish using the Setup program to define your
computer’s configuration, use ? to highlight Exit at the main
Setup menu and press IEnter The following Setup summary
appears on the screen:
Memory
Password
Display type
Base memory
640 KB
Extended memory
3072 KB
Power-on password
not installed
Network server mode
OFF
Detected VGA
EGA,MCGA,VGA or other
processor speed
2-30
Running the Setup Program
High
There are two more Setup summary screens you need to check.
To display the next screen, press m. You see the following:
Real-time clock
Time
13:40:38
Date
03-29-1992
not installed
Diskette drive
Drive A:
1.44 MB
Drive B:
None
Speaker
Enabled
Initial num lock
ON
Keyboard repeat rate
Normal
Serial
Primary
Parallel
Primary
If you have never set the real-time clock, the entry at the top of
the screen flashes to remind you to set the time and date. See
“Setting the Real-time Clock” on page 2-17 for instructions.
Running the Setup Program
2-31
To view the last Setup summary screen, press m. You see
your hard disk drive configuration(s):
Hard disk drive
Drive 1:
Type
Drive 2:
34
None
Number of cylinders
0
13
Number of heads
0
sectors
51
Number Of Sectors
0
Precomp. cylinder
OFFFF
Precomp. cylinder
0
Landing zone
0
Total capacity (MB)
.0
Number of cylinders
723
Number of heads
Number
of
Landing zone
Total capacity (MB)
722
234.06
Check each Setup summary screen to see if all the information
is correct. You can press m to display the previous screen
or (@@ to display the next screen. If anything is incorrect,
highlight Change settings and press m. The main
Setup menu appears and you can change the appropriate
settings.
Leaving the Setup Menu
If you did not change any settings or you want to cancel the
changes you made, highlight Exit without saving at a
Setup summary screen and press IEnter The Operation Menu
appears.
2-32
Running the Setup Program
If you want to save the settings you entered, highlight
** EXIT AND SAVE ** and press m at a Setup summary
screen. The Setup program stores the new settings and resets
the computer using the new configuration. If you have set a
password, you need to enter it at the key prompt. (See “Using
a Power-on Password” in Chapter 3 for instructions.) The
Operation Menu appears.
If you have just run Setup for the first time, remove the
Reference diskette from the drive and turn off your computer.
Then follow the instructions in your MS-DOS manual to install
the operating system. (If you are using a different operating
system, follow the installation instructions in that manual.)
Once you have installed MS-DOS, you should always boot the
computer from the hard disk or the MS-DOS Startup diskette
when you are finished running Setup. First remove the
Reference diskette from drive A. If you do not have a hard disk,
insert the Startup diskette. Then reset your computer to make
sure it performs all the commands in the CONFIG.SYS and
AUTOEXEC.BAT files.
If the computer displays an error message while it is starting
up, run the Setup program again and check the setting the error
message indicates. If the computer still displays an error
message after you check your Setup program settings, see
Appendix B or C, or ask your dealer for assistance.
Be sure to make a backup copy of your Reference diskette
Running the Setup Program
2-33
Chapter 3
Using Your Computer
This chapter briefly describes the following procedures for
using your computer:
Q
Installing MS-DOS or another operating system
CI
Copying the Reference and Utility diskette files
tl
Locking the computer’s cover
Cl
Using special keys on the keyboard
CI
Stopping a command or program
tl Resetting the computer
tl
Using a power-on password
0
Preparing a hard disk for moving.
Installing MS- DOS or Another Operating System
After you connect the components of your system and run the
Setup program, you must install the operating system on your
computer. The instructions in this manual assume that you are
using MS-DOS with your computer, but you can install another
operating system, such as OS/2 or UNIX. See the documentation
that came with your operating system for instructions on
installing it.
Note
Be sure to make backup copies of your original operating
system diskettes.
Using Your Computer
3-1
Copying the Reference and Utility Files
If you have a hard disk, you’ll probably want to copy some of
the files on your Reference and Utility diskettes to the hard disk
for convenience. This allows you to run the programs any time
without having to insert a diskette. Copy the following files
from the Reference diskette to your hard disk:
AFDD.EXE
ESPEED.EXE
HDSIT.VER ROMBIOS.COM
HDSIT.COM
(See Chapter 4 and Appendix B for instructions on using these
files.)
The Reference diskette also contains files for the Setup program
and the System diagnostics program. Because you should
always run these programs from the Reference diskette, do not
copy these files to your hard disk.
The Utility diskettes contain VGA drivers that allow you to
display graphics in certain high-resolution modes. If you want
to use any of these extended modes on your VGA monitor,
copy any VGA files you need to your hard disk. See the VGA
Utilities booklet for instructions.
Note
Be sure to make backup copies of your Reference and Utility
diskettes.
3-2
Using Your Computer
Locking the Computer’s Cover
You can lock the cover onto the computer to prevent
unauthorized users from accessing its internal components.
To lock the cover, insert the key as shown on the left and turn it
clockwise. To unlock the cover, insert the key as shown on the
right and turn it counterclockwise.
Special Keys on the Keyboard
Certain keys on your keyboard serve special functions when
your computer is running MS-DOS or application programs.
These special keys are described in the table below.
Special key functions
Moves the cursor one tab to the right in normal
mode and one tab to the left in Shift mode.
Changes the letter keys from lower- to
uppercase; changes back to lowercase when
pressed again. The numeric/symbol keys on the
top row of the keyboard and the symbol keys in
the main part of the keyboard are not affected.
Produces uppercase characters or the top
symbols on the keys when used with the main
character keys. Produces lowercase characters
when the Caps Lock function is on.
Using Your Computer
3-3
Purpose
I
Works with other keys to perform special (control)
functions, such as editing operations in MS-DOS
and various application programs.
Works with other keys to enter alternate
character codes or functions.
Moves the cursor back one space, deleting the
character to the left of the cursor.
Ends a line of keyboard input or executes a
Turns the Insert function on and off.
Deletes the character marked by the cursor.
I
Control cursor location,
Changes the function of the numeric/cursor keys
from entering numbers to positioning the cursor;
1 changes back when pressed again.
I
Cancels the current command line or operation.
Perform special functions within application
programs.
Prints the screen display on a printer.
Generates the System Request function in some
application programs (used with Alt).
Controls scrolling in some applications.
Suspends the current operation.
Terminates the current operation (when used
with Ctrl).
The [=I, [G), and [ZLoekl] keys work as toggles; press
the key once to turn on a function and again to turn it off. When
the function is enabled, the corresponding light in the upper
right corner of the keyboard is on.
3-4
Using Your Computer
Stopping a Command or Program
You may sometimes need to stop a command or program while
it is running. If you have entered an MS-DOS command that
you want to stop, try one of the following commands:
Cl
Hold down the m key and press [cl.
D
Hold down the [ key and press w.
These methods may also work in your application program.
If not, you may need to reset the computer as described below.
Caution
Do not turn off the computer to stop a program or command
because the computer erases any data you did not save.
Resetting the Computer
Occasionally, you may want to clear the computer’s current
settings or its memory without turning it off. You can do this
by resetting the computer.
For example, if an error occurs and the computer does not
respond to your keyboard entries, you can reset it to reload
your operating system and try again. However, resetting
erases any data in memory that you have not saved; so reset
only if necessary.
Caution
Do not reset the computer as a means to exit a program.
Some programs classify and store new data when you exit
them in the normal manner. If you reset the computer
without properly exiting a program, you may lose data.
Using Your Computer
3-5
To reset the computer, the operating system must be either on
the hard disk or on a diskette in drive A; so if you do not have a
hard disk, insert the system diskette in drive A.
There are two ways to reset the computer:
Ll If you are using MS-DOS, hold down m and [ and
press the [Delete] key. The screen goes blank for a moment
and then the computer reloads MS-DOS. If it doesn’t, try
the next method.
tl
Press the RESET button on the front panel. This method
works even when the computer does not respond to your
keyboard entries.
If resetting the computer does not correct the problem, you
probably need to turn it off and on again. Remove any
diskette(s) from the diskette drive(s). Turn off the computer
and wait five seconds. If you do not have a hard disk, insert the
system diskette in drive A. Then turn on the computer.
Using a Power-on Password
If you set a power-on password when you ran the Setup
program, you must enter it every time you turn on or reset the
computer. Follow these steps to use your password:
1.
If you do not have a hard disk, insert your system diskette
in drive A.
2.
Turn on or reset the computer. You see this key prompt:
3. At the key prompt, type your power-on password. The key
turns when you type a character, but the screen does not
display the characters you type. Then press m.
3-6
Using Your Computer
After you type the password correctly and press ml, a
happy face character appears. Then the computer loads the
operating system and displays the command prompt.
Note
If you turned on network server mode when you ran the
Setup program, you need to use a different procedure to
enter your password. See “Using Your Computer as a
Network Server” in Chapter 4.
You have three chances to enter the correct password. After the
third incorrect try, the screen displays a zero, the keyboard
locks up, and you cannot use the computer. Reset the computer
and try to enter the correct password again.
Note
If you do not know the correct password, see “Password
Problems” in Appendix B.
Changing a Power-on Password
To change your power-on password, follow these steps:
1.
If you do not have a hard disk, insert your system diskette
in drive A.
2.
Turn on or reset the computer. At the key prompt, enter
your current password followed by a forward slash (/) and
the new one you want to use. For example, if your current
password is 123 and you want to change it to ABC, type:
123/ABC
The screen does not display what you type.
Using Your Computer
3-7
Do not use characters requiring the m key, such as $, @,
or *, in your new password.
3.
Press IEnter A happy face character appears and then the
computer loads the operating system.
Deleting a Power-on Password
To delete your power-on password, follow these steps:
1.
If you do not have a hard disk, insert your system diskette
in drive A.
2.
Turn on or reset the computer. At the key prompt, enter
your current password followed by a forward slash. For
example, if your password is 123, type:
123/
3.
Press B. A happy face character appears and then the
computer loads the operating system.
The next time you turn on or reset the computer, it does not
request a password and loads the operating system
immediately.
3-8
Using Your Computer
Preparing the Hard Disk for Moving
If you need to move your computer to a new location, you may
want to run the HDSIT program (on your Reference diskette) to
protect the hard disk during the move.
HDSIT moves (or parks) the disk drive’s read/write heads to a
region on the disk surface that does not contain data, and locks
them securely in position. This protects the hard disk from
being damaged if the computer is bumped accidentally.
Many hard disk drives, including all Epson drives, automatically
park their heads when you turn off the computer. If your hard
disk drive does not do this, or if you are not sure that it does, be
sure to run HDSIT.
Follow these steps:
1.
Exit any program you are using and make sure the MS-DOS
command prompt appears on the screen.
2.
If you copied HDSIT to your hard disk (as described at the
beginning of this chapter), type c : and press (Enter] to log
onto the root directory of the hard disk.
If you did not copy HDSIT to drive C, insert the Reference
diskette in drive A. Then type A : and press m to log
onto that drive.
3.
Type the following and press [Enter:
HDSIT
You see a message on the screen as the computer locks the
heads and disables the keyboard. Remove any diskettes and
turn off the computer. You are now ready to move it to the new
location.
Using Your Computer
3-9
Chapter 4
Enhancing System Operations
This chapter tells you how to use the following procedures to
enhance the operation of your computer:
Ll
Using AUTOEXEC.BAT and other batch files
a
Changing the processor speed
Ll
Reassigning the diskette drives
CI
Using your computer as a network server
tl
Using expanded memory beyond 640KB
0
Using special VGA features.
Using AUTOEXEC.BAT and Other Batch Files
As you get used to using MS-DOS and your application
programs, you may find that there are commands you need to
run frequently. You can automate the execution of these
commands by listing them in a special file called a batch file.
When you type the name of the batch file and press IEnter
MS-DOS executes the commands in the file just as if you had
typed each command from the keyboard.
If you have a word processing program that can save a file as a
text-only file (sometimes called an ASCII file), you can use that
program to create a batch file. You can also use the MS-DOS
COPY or EDLIN command, or a text editor, to create the file.
Enhancing System Operations
4-1
One batch file that you may find particularly useful is called
AUTOEXEC.BAT. Every time you turn on your computer,
MS-DOS looks for the AUTOEXEC.BAT file and automatically
executes each of the commands in the file.
When you install MS-DOS, it creates an AUTOEXEC.BAT file
for you. To modify the file or replace it with a new one, you can
use the COPY or EDLIN command, a text editor, or a word
processing program that can save a file as text-only. Be sure to
name the file AUTOEXEC.BAT and store it in the root directory
of the hard disk or diskette from which you load MS-DOS.
See your MS-DOS manual for more information about creating
and using batch files.
Changing the Processor Speed
Your computer’s processor can operate at two speeds: high and
low. High speed is 25 MHz or 50 MHz (depending on your
model) and low speed simulates an 8 MHz processor speed. At
high speed, the computer can access memory faster than at low
speed. The default setting is high speed unless you changed it
in Setup to low or to change automatically.
Note
When your computer is operating at high speed, the TURBO
light on the front panel is on. It is off when the computer is
operating at low speed.
You should use high speed for almost everything you do
because your programs will work faster. However, certain
application programs have specific timing requirements and
can run only at the slower speed. See your software manual to
determine if this is the case.
4-2
Enhancing System Operations
Some copy-protected programs require the computer to run at
low speed while accessing the program on a diskette. These
programs also usually require you to leave a key disk-the
diskette that contains the copy protection-in the diskette
drive. If you use a copy-protected program often, you may
want to set your processor speed to change automatically to
low speed when accessing the diskette and return to high speed
when it is finished.
Depending on the type of copy-protected program you have,
you may or may not want to set the processor to automatic
speed. Follow these guidelines:
Cl
If you are using a copy-protected program that can run
only on a diskette or that requires a key disk, try to load the
program at high speed. If this works, you do not need to set
the speed to change automatically. If you can’t load the
program on high, set the speed to change automatically.
tl
If you are using a copy-protected program that does not
require a key disk but requires a special procedure to install
it on a hard disk, set the speed to low while you are
installing the program. Then set the speed to high while
you load and run the program.
If this does not work, try installing and loading the
program at low speed and then change to high speed to run
it. Do not set the speed to change automatically.
There are three ways to change the processor speed:
tl
Run the Setup program
Cl
Enter a keyboard command
Cl
Run the ESPEED program.
Enhancing System Operations
4-3
If you frequently use programs that require low or automatic
speed, use Setup to change the processor speed. See Chapter 2
for instructions.
If you use these programs only occasionally, you should use
the keyboard commands or the ESPEED program (described
below) to change the processor speed.
Entering Keyboard Commands
You can change the processor speed by entering one of the
following commands:
[=I [AnI] m Changes the speed to high.
[F] (Aa] a C h a n g e s t h e s p e e d t o l o w .
CT] [T] m Changes the speed to low when the computer
accesses a diskette.
To enter these commands, hold down the m key and the
m key and press the m, m, or m key located on the
numeric keypad. The commands do not work if you use the
characters on the main keyboard.
Note
You can use the commands listed above while you are
running a program. However, if the program uses one of the
same commands for another function, you cannot use it to
change the processor speed. For example, if you are running
a program that uses the (xl [T] a command to move
the cursor, you cannot enter [F] IT] a to change the
processor speed to low. Another alternative is to use the
ESPEED program, described below.
4-4
Enhancing System Operations
The speed setting remains in effect until you press the RESET
button or turn off the computer, or until you change it again
using the Setup program, another keyboard command, or the
ESPEED program, described below.
Using the ESPEED Program
ESPEED provides an easy way to change the processor speed if
your application program does not recognize the m key
commands or if you want to include the program command in
a batch file.
The ESPEED program is on the Reference diskette. If you
have a hard disk drive, copy the file ESPEED.EXE from your
Reference diskette onto your hard disk-if you have not
already done so-and run the program from there. If you do
not have a hard disk, insert your Reference diskette in drive A
and log onto drive A before you enter the command to start the
program.
To run the ESPEED program, type the following at the MS-DOS
command prompt and press I:
ESPEED
You see the following messages:
Usage: ESPEED[/H] [/L] [/A]
/High
set High speed (no auto)
/Low
set Low speed (no auto)
/Auto
set Auto speed
These messages tell you the switches you should use to set the
speed to high, low, or automatic. At the MS-DOS prompt, type
the ESPEED command again and include the appropriate
switch, such as the following:
ESPEED /A
Enhancing System Operations
4-5
(This command sets the processor speed to change to low speed
automatically when the computer accesses a diskette.)
If you include the switch when you type the initial ESPEED
command, the program changes the speed without displaying
the command options.
The processor speed you set remains in effect until you change
it using the Setup program, a keyboard command, or the
ESPEED program again or until you press the RESET button or
turn off the computer.
Entering the ESPEED command in a batch file
You may want to run the ESPEED program by including the
command in a batch file. For example, let’s say you have a
program called SLOWDOWN which requires a slower
processor speed. You could include the following commands in
a batch file to start the SLOWDOWN program:
ESPEED /A
SLOWDOWN
You could name the batch file SLOW.BAT. Whenever you need
to run the SLOWDOWN program, insert the program diskette
into drive A. Then type SLOW and press IEnter The computer
changes the processor speed to automatic and starts the
program.
4-6
Enhancing System Operations
Reassigning the Diskette Drives
If your system has two diskette drives, they are connected
inside your computer so that the top drive is A and the bottom
drive is B. Because drive A is the boot drive, whenever you want
to load the operating system or a bootable program from a
diskette, you must insert the diskette into drive A.
If both of your drives are the same type-3Winch, 1.44MB
capacity, for example-you never need to reassign the drives. If
your two drives are different types, however, you may need to
change the drive letter assignments so you can boot the
computer from drive B. For example, you may have a 5V4-inch
program disk which you need to use to boot the computer. Or
you may have an application program that requires you to
leave the 5?&inch key disk in drive A while you run the
program.
For these situations, you can reverse the drive assignments to
make the top drive B and the bottom drive A. There are two
ways to do this:
tl
Insert the diskette in drive B and turn on the computer.
The drive automatically becomes drive A.
Cl
Run the AFDD program to reassign the drive. See “Using
the AFDD Program,” below, for instructions.
Your assignments remain in effect until you press the RESET
button or turn off the computer, or until you reassign the drives
to their original assignments. The reassignment remains in
effect if you reset the computer from your hard disk by
entering the (F] [y] [E) command.
Enhancing System Operations
4-7
Using the AFDD Program
AFDD reverses the current diskette drive assignments and
resets the system. When you are done using the reversed drive
assignments, you can use the AFDD program again to reassign
the drives to their original configuration.
The AFDD program is provided with your system on the
Reference diskette. If you do not have a hard disk, insert your
Reference diskette in drive A and log onto drive A before you
enter the command to start the program.
If you have a hard disk drive, copy the file AFDD.EXE from the
Reference diskette onto your hard disk (if you have not already
done so); then you can run the program from there.
To run AFDD, type the following at the command prompt and
press I:
AFDD
You see messages such as the following:
New Assign Present
Drive A:
1.44MB <= 1.2MB
Drive B:
1.2MB
<= 1.44MB
Any
other key to abort ?
(S)et and Reboot,
If you inserted the Reference diskette to run AFDD, remove it
now.
If you want to change the drive assignments, press [sl. The
system reboots and loads the operating system, and the new
drive assignments take effect. If you do not want to change the
drive assignments, press any other key.
4-8
Enhancing System Operations
If you are running the AFDD program from a hard disk, you
can reassign the drives and reset the corn
Type the following command and press
AFDD /S
The /S switch tells the AFDD program to reset the computer,
load MS-DOS, and change the diskette drive assignments
without displaying the messages.
Note
You may want to run AFDD by including the command in a
batch file.
Using Your Computer as a Network Server
A network server is the master computer in a network and
provides storage space for the other computers connected to it.
It can also write files to and read files from the other
computers, making it the most powerful computer in the
network.
Even if no one is typing commands at the network server
keyboard, the server can process commands sent to it from
other computers. If you use your computer as the network
server, you may want to prevent unauthorized users from
entering commands at the keyboard. To provide this security,
you can enable a power-on password in network server mode
using the Setup program.
Enhancing System Operations
4-9
If you set a power-on password but do not turn on network
server mode, you enter the password before the computer loads
the operating system or the network software. Once you load it,
anyone can access your system by typing commands on the
keyboard. However, if you set a password and turn on network
server mode, you can load your operating system or network
software before you enter the password. This allows other
computers in the network to access the system, but prevents
unauthorized users from entering commands at your keyboard
and using any network server access privileges.
When you boot the computer in network server mode, you do
not see the key prompt ( @IIT ), as you would if network server
mode was turned off. The password prompt is hidden to
prevent unauthorized users from knowing that a password is
required.
You do not have to set a password in network server mode to
use your computer as a network server, but it is helpful. See
“Setting the Power-on Password” in Chapter 2 for instructions
on setting the password and enabling network server mode.
Then read the next section to use your network password.
Note
If your hard disk drive has a partition larger than 32MB, you
must use the MS-DOS SHARE command to install file
sharing and locking protection in a network environment.
See your MS-DOS manual for more information.
If you do not install SHARE, the following message flashes
on your screen after you install your networking software
and reboot your computer:
WARNING! SHARE should be loaded for large media
4-10
Enhancing System Operations
Using a Password in Network Server Mode
When you turn on or reset the computer, it loads your
operating system or network software and you see either the
command prompt or the first screen displayed by your
network software.
Follow these steps to enter your password:
1.
Turn on or reset your computer. You do not see the key
prompt ( @rrr ) even though the computer is now waiting
for you to enter the correct password.
2.
Type your password and press IEnter The screen does not
display what you type.
Now you should be able to use your computer. Press a key
such as (Enter] to see if the keyboard accepts your command.
If you entered an incorrect password, the computer does not
respond. Type the correct password, press IEnter and try using
the computer again.
Note
You cannot change or delete a power-on password in
network server mode. You must run Setup and turn off
network server mode first. See Chapter 2 for instructions.
Then you can change or delete the password as described in
Chapter 3.
Enhancing System Operations
4-11
Using Expanded Memory Beyond 640KB
Your computer comes with 4MB of random access memory.
MS-DOS and your application programs that run under
MS-DOS use the first 640KB of memory. You can use the
unused memory above 640KB as extended memory, or you can
convert it to expanded memory, as described below.
Expanded memory is used by application programs (such as
Lotus® 1-2-3®) that support the Lotus/Intel/Microsoft
Expanded Memory Specification (LIM 4.0 EMS). To take
advantage of expanded memory, you need to use a memory
management program to convert the computer’s extended
memory to expanded memory.
If you selected a memory management software package when
you bought your computer, you can use it with any version of
MS-DOS. Just follow the instructions included with the package.
If you are using MS-DOS version 4.01 or 5.0 and you did not
get a memory manager, you can use the MS-DOS program
EMM386.SYS or EMM386EXE (respectively) to convert your
extended memory to expanded memory. See your MS-DOS
manuals for instructions.
If you are using MS-DOS version 3.3 and you did not get a
memory manager, ask your authorized Epson dealer which
expanded memory manager program you should use.
4-12
Enhancing System Operations
Using Special VGA Features
Your built-in VGA display adapter supports standard VGA
monitors and multi-frequency monitors with analog
connectors. The VGA adapter allows these monitors to operate
in all standard VGA modes without requiring any special
device drivers. However, if you want to use extended VGA
modes, you can install one or more of the device drivers
provided on your Utility diskettes. These drivers allow you to
use all of the capabilities of your monitor and built-in VGA
display adapter.
The device drivers provide VGA features such as these:
Q
Resolutions of 800 x 600 or 1024 x 768 (non-interlaced)
in graphics modes with 16 colors
Li
Resolutions up to 640 x 480 in graphics modes with
256 colors
Cl
132-column text mode in 16 colors
Ll Graphics cursor movement performed by the built-in
VGA hardware.
Note
To use graphic display drivers in 800 x 600 or 1024 x 768
resolutions, you must have a multi-frequency monitor
capable of displaying these resolutions. Standard VGA
monitors cannot display them.
Enhancing System Operations
4-13
The Utility diskettes that came with your computer contain
device drivers for various application programs, as well as
special utilities that allow you to enhance VGA performance.
See the VGA Utilities booklet for more information about VGA
device drivers and utilities.
4-14
Enhancing System Operations
Chapter 5
Accessing Internal Components
To access your computer’s internal components, you need to
remove the cover. In some cases, you may also need to remove
the front panel and the subassembly (the metal case that holds
the drive bays). The instructions in this chapter explain how to
do these tasks:
Ll
Remove and replace the cover
Ll
Remove and replace the front panel
Ll
Remove and replace the subassembly
Ll
Perform post-installation setup procedures.
Read the following safety precautions before you begin.
Special Precautions
As you perform the procedures described in this chapter and in
Chapters 6 and 7, observe the following precautions to avoid
damaging your equipment or injuring yourself:
Ll
While this manual provides detailed instructions for
installing a variety of optional equipment, do not attempt a
procedure if you have any reservations about performing it;
ask your dealer for assistance.
tl
Always turn off the computer, disconnect all cables to the
computer and any peripheral devices, and wait at least
30 seconds before you remove the cover. First disconnect
the power cord from the electrical outlet and from the
computer’s back panel. Then disconnect all peripheral
devices, including the monitor and keyboard.
Accessing Internal Components
5-1
0
Every time you remove the cover, be sure to ground
yourself by touching the inside of the computer’s back
panel before you touch any components inside. If you are
not properly grounded, you could conduct static electricity
and damage your components. Also, do not touch any
components except those that this manual instructs you to
touch.
Ll When disconnecting cables from sockets on the computer’s
main system board or any devices (such as disk drives),
avoid pulling on the cable; grasp the plastic connector to
remove it from a socket.
Cl
When plugging a connector or a component into a socket,
be sure to position it correctly. Carefully align any
connector pins with the corresponding holes in the socket
before you push in the connector. Otherwise, you can
severely damage the equipment.
Li
Always replace the computer’s cover before you turn on the
power, or the computer may overheat.
Removing the Cover
Remove the computer’s cover to do any of the following:
5-2
tl
Change jumper settings
c3
Install or remove option cards
Cl
Install or remove single inline memory modules (SIMMs)
Q
Install or remove a math coprocessor
Li
Install or remove disk drives or other storage devices.
Accessing Internal Components
Follow these steps to remove the cover:
1.
Turn off the computer and any peripheral devices connected
to it. Then disconnect the computer’s power cord from the
electrical outlet and from the back panel. Also disconnect
any peripheral device cables that are connected to the
computer, including the keyboard cable.
2.
Turn the computer around so you are facing the back panel.
3.
If necessary, unlock the computer’s cover. (See Chapter 3 for
instructions.)
4.
Loosen the three thumbscrews on the computer’s back panel
by turning them counterclockwise, as shown below. (The
screws disengage but don’t come all the way off.)
Accessing Internal Components
5-3
5.
Grasp the sides of the cover (toward the front of the
computer) and pull it firmly toward you, as shown below.
Then lift it up and off the computer.
Removing the Front Panel
You must remove the computer’s front panel if you need to
install or remove a disk drive from the external drive bay or if
you need to remove the subassembly from the computer.
Follow these steps:
1. Turn the computer so you are facing the front panel.
5-4
Accessing Internal Components
2.
Release the six tabs securing the front panel to the computer
case, as shown below. You may want to use a flat-blade
screwdriver to release the tabs.
3.
Once these tabs are free, grasp the sides of the front panel
and pull it straight toward you to disengage the two tabs at
the bottom, as shown below. Be careful not to pull the panel
off at an angle; this may bend or pop off the power and
RESET buttons. If a button pops off, carefully place it back
onto its post.
Accessing Internal Components
5-5
Removing the Subassembly
You need to remove the subassembly only if you are installing
or removing the hard disk drive that is mounted next to the
power supply.
Follow these steps:
1. Turn the computer so you are facing the front panel.
2.
5-6
Disconnect the power supply and drive cables from the
backs of all the drives installed in your computer, as shown
below. Note which cables are connected to which drives so
you can easily reconnect them later.
Accessing Internal Components
3.
Open the clasp holding the power supply and drive cables to
the side of the subassembly, as shown below. Then remove
all the cables from the clasp.
4.
Grasp the back of the subassembly by the edge on its upper
left side, as shown below, and lift up the back end.
5.
Pull the subassembly forward slightly to release it from the
two pins beneath the front panel opening. Then lift it out of
the computer and place it on your work surface.
Accessing Internal Components
5-7
Replacing the Subassembly
Follow these steps to replace the subassembly:
5-8
1.
Turn the computer so you are facing the front panel.
2.
Hold the subassembly at a slight angle and guide the front of
it down through the opening in the front of the computer,
as shown below.
3.
Fit the two holes in the lower front of the subassembly over
the two posts on the front of the computer case, as shown
above.
Accessing Internal Components
4.
Lower the back end of the subassembly into the computer.
If necessary, fit the post beneath the back right edge of the
subassembly into the hole on the top of the power supply.
Then lower the subassembly all the way down.
5.
If necessary, connect the diskette drive cable to the FDD
socket on the main board, then connect the hard disk drive
cable to the HDD socket beside it. (These sockets are
located to the right of the memory card.)
6. Gather the power supply and drive cables in the clasp on the
side of the subassembly. Snap the clasp shut.
Accessing Internal Components
5-9
7.
Connect the power supply and drive cables to the backs of all
your drives, as described in Chapter 7.
Replacing the Front Panel
Follow these steps to replace the computer’s front panel:
1. Turn the computer so you are facing its front.
5-10
2.
Align the openings in the front panel with the power button,
RESET button, and drives that extend out from the front of
your computer case. Also align the front panel tabs with the
corresponding notches in the case. Then guide the front
panel straight onto the computer case, as shown below.
3.
Press the front panel onto the computer to fully insert all the
tabs into the notches on the computer case. If all the front
panel tabs do not snap into position, remove the front panel
and try again.
Accessing Internal Components
Replacing the Cover
Follow these steps to replace the computer’s cover:
1. Turn the computer so you are facing the back panel.
2.
Hold the cover at a slight angle, as shown below, and lower
the front part onto the computer. Then lower the back of
the cover.
3.
Slide the cover forward until the front edge overlaps the top
edge of the front panel.
4.
Tighten the three thumbscrews on the back panel to secure
the cover to the computer.
5.
Lock the computer’s cover, if desired. (See Chapter 3.)
6.
Reconnect your monitor, printer, keyboard, and any other
peripheral devices you have. Then reconnect the power
cord to the back of the computer and to an electrical outlet.
Accessing Internal Components
5-11
Post-installation Setup
Any time you install or remove a math coprocessor or memory
modules, you must run the Setup program on your Reference
diskette so it can automatically update the computer’s
configuration information. You must also run Setup if you
install or remove any other type of option, such as an option
card or a disk drive. For example, if you add a hard disk drive,
you need to let the computer know the type of drive you have
installed. Follow the instructions in Chapter 2 to run Setup.
If you install a hard disk drive that has never received a
hardware level format (such as some non-Epson hard disk
drives), you need to format it before use. Check the manual that
came with your drive to see if it is already formatted, and then,
if necessary, follow the instructions in Appendix A to format
the new hard disk.
If you have added a hard disk drive and you want to load
MS-DOS or another operating system from that drive, you need
to install the operating system on it. See the documentation that
came with your operating system for instructions.
If you install a memory option card, use the setup program that
came with it to configure the computer for use with the card.
See your memory card manual for instructions.
If you want to use any of your extended memory as
Additionally, you may need to add some commands to your
configuration files. See your operating system manual and the
manual that comes with your optional equipment for
instructions.
5-12
Accessing Internal Components
You may also want to test a newly-installed option. Some
options come with their own diagnostics programs; however,
you can test the following with the System diagnostics program
on your Reference diskette:
Ll System memory
Lt Math coprocessor
Ci
Serial and parallel ports
tl Disk drives
Q
Monitors and display adapters
Cl
Dot matrix printers.
See Appendix C for instructions.
Accessing Internal Components
5-13
Chapter 6
Installing and Removing Options
You can enhance the performance of your computer by adding
a variety of options, including the following:
Q Option cards
CI Memory modules
Li An 80487SX microprocessor with built-in math coprocessor
(for the 25 MHz model).
An option card is a circuit board you install in your computer
to add a particular function. Most option cards contain a
device, such as a modem, or provide an interface, such as a
monitor connector. This chapter describes how to install option
cards and configure your computer for use with them.
Memory modules-also called SIMMs (single inline memory
modules)-allow you to increase the amount of memory in
your computer. This chapter describes the types and amounts
of SIMMs you can install on the memory card in your
computer. If you want to install memory modules, it is best to
ask your dealer to do it for you. You can, however, follow the
instructions in this chapter to install them yourself.
Note
It is best to add memory to your computer by installing
SIMMs rather than an additional memory card. Memory
modules are more efficient because the computer can access
memory installed on SIMMs faster than memory installed on
a card. If you do install an additional memory card, it will
slow the performance of your computer.
Installing and Removing Options
6-1
A math coprocessor speeds up the numeric calculations and
graphic displays your computer performs when using certain
application software. The 50 MHz model includes a built-in
math coprocessor. If you have the 25 MHz model and you want
math coprocessor capabilities, you must remove your 80486SX
microprocessor and install the 80487SX microprocessor (with
an internal math coprocessor). Because the system circuitry
may be damaged if this procedure is not performed correctly,
you must have an authorized Epson dealer or Service Center do
it for you.
This chapter also explains how to change the jumper settings
inside the computer. You need to change jumper settings if you
add memory modules, install certain types of option cards, or
want to change the way your computer operates.
In addition, you’ll find an illustration of your main system
board which shows the location of the jumpers, option slots,
and any other components you may need to locate.
Before you can change jumper settings or install any of the
options mentioned above, you need to remove the cover from
the computer. See Chapter 5 for instructions.
6-2
Installing and Removing Options
Main System Board
As you follow the instructions in this chapter and in Chapter 7,
use the illustration below to locate the necessary components
on your main system board.
parallel port
^^_:-I --A
VGA monitor
port
keyboard port
\
, (CN2)
a
option
slots
37
w-
l-4 l bl IWI lull I
1
power
supply
connectors
icroprocessor
diskette drive
connector (FDD)
JP5
JP6
JP9
JP10
JP11
JP12
JP13
JP14
JP15
connector
drive connector
(HDD)
* 25 MHz system only
Installing and Removing Options
6-3
Jumper Settings
If you change your computer’s configuration or need to alter
the way it operates, you may need to change a jumper setting
inside the computer.
A jumper is a small electrical connector that controls one of the
computer’s functions. The jumper settings in your computer
are preset at the factory; however, you can control certain
features by changing the standard settings as follows:
tl
Enable or disable the built-in mouse connector
Cl
Set your monitor type to monochrome or color
Ll Change the amount of base memory
tl
Enable or disable the power-on password function
U
Enable or disable the built-in VGA display adapter
tl
Change the operation of the input/output ready signal.
If you increase your computer’s memory by installing memory
modules, you must set a group of jumpers to indicate the
amount of memory you now have.
If you have the 25 MHz model and you had your 80486SX
microprocessor chip replaced with a 80487SX chip, you must
set jumpers JP1, JP2, and JP3 to indicate a new microprocessor
is installed. (Because the 50 MHz model has a built-in math
coprocessor, these jumpers are not used.)
If you need to change any jumper settings, locate the jumpers
on the main system board, shown on page 6-3.
6-4
Installing and Removing Options
A jumper’s setting is determined by where the jumper is placed
on the pins. The jumper connects either pin A and the middle
pin (position A) or pin B and the middle pin (position B), as
shown below.
position A
position B
J=&!gB L$gA &zJg
A
A
A
The following tables list the jumper settings and their functions.
Miscellaneous jumper settings
Jumper
number
Jumper
setting
Function
JP4
A’
B
Enables the built-in VGA display adapter
Disables the built-in VGA display adapter so you
can use a display adapter on an option card in
your computer as your primary adapter
JP5
A
B*
Disables the power-on password
Enables the power-on password
JP6
i A*
B
Color monitor is installed
Monochrome monitor is installed
1_
l
JP7
A’
B
Enables the built-in mouse connector
Disables the built-in mouse connector so you can
use a mouse or other pointing device
connected to a port on an option card in your
computer
JP15
A
B*
Enables the early input/output ready signal
Sets a normal input/output ready signal
Factory setting
Installing and Removing Options
6-5
Jumper settings for base memory
l
Base memory
Jumper JP13
Jumper JP14
640KB
A’
A’
512KB
B
A
256KB
B
B
Factory setting
Jumper settings for extended memory
l
Factory setting
Jumper settings for alternate 25 MHz microprocessor
Jumper
number
Jumper
setting
Function
JP2
A
B*
80487SX installed; NMI signal
80486SX installed; NMI signal
80487SX installed; FERR signal
80486SX installed; FERR signal
* Factory setting; these jumpers are not used for the 50 MHz microprocessor
6-6
Installing and Removing Options
Changing the Jumper Settings
If you need to change any jumper settings, follow these steps:
1.
Remove any option cards that may be blocking your access to
the jumpers. See page 6-12 for instructions.
2.
Change the jumper settings as necessary according to the
tables above.
To move a jumper from one position to the other, use
needle-nose pliers or tweezers to pull it off its pins and
gently move it to the desired position. Be careful not to lose
the jumper.
Caution
Be careful not to bend the jumper pins or damage any
surrounding components on the main system board.
3.
Replace any option cards you removed. See “Installing an
Option Card,” below.
4.
Follow the instructions in Chapter 5 to replace the computer’s
cover.
Installing and Removing Options
6-7
Option Cards
Your computer has six standard option slots: five 16-bit slots
and one 8-bit access slot. Each slot can accommodate an option
card. You can buy option cards from authorized Epson dealers
as well as other vendors.
Before you install an option card, check the power
requirements given in the card’s documentation. Make sure
that the power required by the card does not exceed the power
limit for its slot, and that the total power for all the cards does
not exceed the power limits for all six slots. The table below
lists the power limits.
Option slot power limits
Maximum current
+5 volts
+ 12
For each slot
7 Amps
1.5 Amps
0.5 Amps
For all six slots
16 Amps
3 Amps
0.5 Amps
Volts
-5 Volts and - 12 Volts
Caution
Although the computer’s power supply is protected against
excessive power loads, you could still damage the main
system board if you install an option card that draws more
power than the limits shown in the table.
This section explains how to install option cards in your
computer. Later on, you may need to remove an option card
to access jumpers; if so, see “Removing an Option Card” on
page 6-12 for instructions.
6-8
Installing and Removing Options
The illustration of the main system board on page 6-3 shows
the six standard option slots inside your computer. Slot 5 is
designed for an 8-bit option card and slots 0 through 4 are
designed for 16-bit cards. As you can see below, a 16-bit card
has an extra connector along the bottom.
16-bit card
8-bit card
Usually it does not matter which slot an option card occupies,
as long as it fits in the slot. For example, you can place some
8-bit cards in a 16-bit slot. However, you must follow these
guidelines when deciding which slot to use:
Ll An S-bit card with an additional tab along the bottom must
go into an 8-bit slot.
il If you install a disk drive that uses a controller card, place
the card as close as possible to the drive it is controlling.
Ll Some option cards must be installed in a specific slot.
Consult the instructions that come with the card to see if
this is the case.
Installing and Removing Options
6-9
Installing Option Cards
Follow these steps to install an option card:
1.
If you are installing an option card that controls a mouse, you
need to change the setting of jumper JP7 before you install
the card. If you install a display adapter card, you may
need to change the settings of jumpers JP4 and JP6. If this is
the case, see page 6-4 for instructions.
2.
Remove the retaining screw from the top of the metal option
slot cover; hold on to the screw so it doesn’t fall into the
computer. Lift out the slot cover.
?
Keep the screw to secure the option card to the computer. Store
the slot cover in a safe place in case you remove the option
card later.
6-10
Installing and Removing Options
3.
Unpack the option card. When you handle it, be careful not
to touch any of the components on the circuit board or the
gold-edged connectors. If you need to set it down before
you install it, place it gently on top of its original packing
material with the component side facing up. Keep the
packing materials in case you remove the card later.
Adjust any switches or jumpers on it, if necessary. (Check
the option card instructions.)
4.
Grip the card firmly by the top corners and make sure the
connectors point down, as shown below.
5.
Insert the card into the slot, guiding it straight down. Once
the connectors enter the slot, push the card downward
firmly (but carefully) to insert it fully. You should feel the
card fit into place.
If the card does not go in smoothly, do not force it; pull it
all the way out and try again, keeping it straight as you
insert it. Examine the card to verify that it is fully seated in
the slot along the length of the connector.
Installing and Removing Options
6-11
6.
Secure the end of the card to the back of the computer with
the retaining screw.
7.
Follow the instructions in Chapter 5 to replace the
computer’s cover. Then see “Post-installation Setup
Procedures” at the end of that chapter for information on
updating your computer’s configuration settings.
Removing an Option Card
If you need to remove an option card, follow these steps:
1.
Remove the screw securing the card to the back of the
computer and pull it straight up and out of the slot.
2. Cover the option slot opening with the original metal slot
cover and secure it with the retaining screw.
6-12
3.
If you are removing an option card that controls a mouse,
you need to change the setting of jumper JP7 on the main
system board. If you are removing a display adapter card,
you may need to change the settings of jumpers JP4 and
JP6. See page 6-4 for instructions.
4.
Replace the computer’s cover as described in Chapter 5.
Installing and Removing Options
Memory Modules
Your computer comes with 4MB of memory soldered onto the
memory card in your computer. By installing SIMMs (single
inline memory modules) on this card, you can increase the
amount of memory in your computer up to 16MB.
Caution
It is best to have your dealer install memory modules for
you because they can be damaged easily if installed
incorrectly. If you prefer, you can install your own SIMMs
by carefully following the instructions in this section.
Before you install SIMMs, check the following guidelines to
ensure that they will work properly:
D
Use SIMMs that operate at 80ns (nanosecond) or faster
access speed. Be sure all the SIMMs you install have the
same access speed.
Ll
Use the correct SIMM configuration to add the amount of
memory you want. See the table on the next page.
Once you have the SIMMs you need, you or your dealer can
install them in your computer. If you want to install them
yourself, follow the instructions below.
Installing and Removing Options
6-13
Installing Memory Modules
There are 12 SIMM sockets on the memory card organized in
three banks consisting of four sockets each. Each socket can
contain one memory module. You must fill all of the sockets in
any bank you use. Since each bank has four sockets, you must
install four SIMMs to fill up the bank.
The following table shows all the possible SIMM configurations
for your computer. Do not install SIMMs in any other
configuration. Remember that the memory card already
contains 4MB (soldered).
SIMM configurations
1 Bank 1
1 Bank 3
j Bank 2
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
K
K
K
K
M
M
M
M
K
K
K
K
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
/ Total memory 1
8MB
9MB
K
K
K
K
10MB
12MB
M
M
M
M
16MB
K = 256KB SIMM installed
M = 1 MB SIMM installed
Once you determine where to the add memory modules, do the
following to install or remove them:
Li
Remove the memory card
Ll
Install or remove the SIMMs
Cl
Replace the memory card.
These procedures are described below.
6-14
Installing and Removing Options
Removing the memory card
Follow these steps to remove the memory card from your
computer:
1. Remove the screw securing the memory card to the bracket at
the front of the computer case, as shown below.
2.
Grasp the top of the card and pull it straight up and out of its
socket.
3.
Gently place it on your work surface with the component side
facing up.
4.
Follow the instructions in the next section(s) to install or
remove SIMMs as necessary.
Installing and Removing Options
6-15
Installing SlMMs
Follow these steps to install SIMMs:
1. Turn the memory card on your work surface so the
connectors at the bottom of the board are toward you.
The sockets are labeled as shown below.
2.
It is easiest to install SIMMs in the left sockets first. Position
each SIMM with the notched edge toward the top of the
socket and insert it on the right side of the tabs at an angle,
as shown below.
tab
6-16
Installing and Removing Options
3.
Gently push the SIMM into the socket and then tilt it left
until it is vertical.
The SIMM should snap into place between the tabs and the
retaining posts. If it does not go in smoothly, do not force it;
pull it all the way out and try again.
Make sure the SIMM is fully inserted into the socket and
that the pins on the retaining posts extend through the
holes in both ends.
4.
Repeat steps 2 and 3 for each SIMM you want to install.
5.
Set the appropriate main system board jumpers to indicate
the total amount of memory you now have. See “Jumper
Settings” on page 6-4 for instructions.
6.
Reinstall the memory card as described on page 6-19.
Installing and Removing Options
6-17
Removing SlMMs
If you need to remove SIMMs from your computer, have your
dealer do it for you or follow the steps below. If you remove
them yourself, check the table on page 6-14 to be sure you
remove SIMMs from the correct sockets.
Follow these steps to remove SIMMs:
1. Turn the memory card on your work surface so the
connectors at the bottom of the board are toward you.
2.
Remove SIMMs from the right sockets first. Use your fingers
or two small screwdrivers to pull away the tabs that secure
the SIMM at each end. Be careful not to pull the tabs too far,
or they may break.
As you pull away the tabs, the SIMM falls to the right at an
angle. Release the tabs and carefully remove the SIMM
from the socket.
3.
6-18
Repeat step 2 for each SIMM you need to remove.
Installing and Removing Options
4.
Set the appropriate main system board jumpers to indicate
the total amount of memory you now have. See “Jumper
Settings” on page 6-4 for instructions.
5.
Follow the instructions below to reinstall the memory card.
Replacing the memory card
Follow these steps to replace the memory card in your
computer:
1.
Hold the card by its top corners and guide it straight down
into its socket on the main system board, as shown below.
2.
Secure the memory card bracket to the front of the computer
case with the retaining screw.
3.
Replace the computer’s cover as described in Chapter 5. Then
see “Post-installation Setup Procedures” at the end of that
chapter for information on updating the computer’s
memory configuration.
Installing and Removing Options
6-19
Chapter 7
Installing and Removing Drives
The instructions in this chapter describe how to install and
remove optional Epson drives in your computer. You can use
these instructions to install a variety of devices, including
diskette drives, hard disk drives, and tape drives. Even if your
drive looks a bit different from the one illustrated here, you
install it the same way.
If you want to install or remove a non-Epson drive, you can
follow these instructions, although some of the steps in this
chapter may not apply. See the manual that came with your
drive for more information.
This chapter describes how to do the following:
CI
Use the correct drive bay
0
Set the IDE (Integrated Drive Electronics) jumpers on a
hard disk drive
Ll
Install or remove a drive in the external drive bay
Ct
Install or remove an internal drive.
Before you perform any of the procedures described below,
remove the computer’s cover as described in Chapter 5. You
may also need to remove the front panel and subassembly; the
instructions in this chapter tell you when this is necessary.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-1
Using the Correct Drive Bay
Your system can hold up to five half-height drives or a
combination of third-, half-, and full-height drives. As shown
below, there are two drive bays: the external drive bay and the
internal drive bay.
subassembly
I
internal drive bay
external drive bay
The external bay can accommodate up to three drives in the
following configurations:
Ll
One third-height drive and two half-height drives
U
One third-height drive and one full-height drive.
You can install either two half-height drives or one full-height
hard disk drive in the internal bay.
If you are installing a hard disk, it is best to install it in the
internal bay. This reserves the more accessible external bay for
any drives you may want to add later. If you prefer, however,
you can install a hard disk in the external bay; just leave the
drive slot cover installed in the front panel.
7-2
Installing and Removing Drives
You can install 3Winch drives in the internal bays. In the
external bay, you can install 51/4-inch drives or 3M-inch drives
with 5%inch mounting frames attached.
You also need to attach metal drive brackets to each drive you
install in the external bay. Two sets of these brackets (with
retaining screws) come in the box with your computer. The
instructions in this chapter tell you how to install them.
Setting the IDE Hard Disk Drive Jumpers
You may need to change the hard disk drive jumper settings if
you install or remove an IDE hard disk drive. The jumpers tell
the computer whether you are using one hard disk drive or two.
Note
You do not need to set any jumpers if you are removing
your only hard disk drive.
If you are installing only one hard disk drive, see “Changing
the Jumper Settings” below to check your drive’s jumpers.
If you are removing one hard disk drive and leaving another in
your computer, you need to change the jumper settings on the
remaining drive to indicate that it is the only hard disk drive
installed.
If you install two hard disk drives, you must change the jumper
settings on each drive to indicate whether it is the master
(primary) or the slave (secondary) drive. The primary drive is
the one from which you boot your computer.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-3
Changing the Jumper Settings
The hard disk drive jumpers are usually located on the drive’s
circuit board, near the large cable connector.
jumpers
The instructions in this section describe setting the jumpers on
the factory-installed hard disk drive. The jumpers on your
drive may be in a slightly different location, but you set them
the same way. See the documentation that came with your hard
disk drive for the proper settings.
7-4
Installing and Removing Drives
Set the jumpers according to the table below.
Hard disk drive jumper settings
X = jumper installed
- = no jumper installed
To move a jumper from one position to the other, use your
fingers, needle-nose pliers, or tweezers to pull it off its pins and
gently move it to the other position. Be careful not to drop the
jumper or damage the pins as you install it.
If you are going to use only one hard disk drive, make sure the
jumper is set in position DS.
If you’ll be using two hard disk drives, install two jumpers on
the master drive in positions SP and DS. Do not install any
jumpers on the slave drive.
To install or remove a drive in the internal drive bay, see
page 7-14.
To install or remove a drive in the external drive bay, see the
next section.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-5
Installing or Removing a Drive in the External Bay
This section describes how to install or remove an Epson
diskette drive; however, you can use these instructions to
install or remove another type of storage device. See the
manual that came with it for additional installation instructions.
Installing a Drive
On each interior side of the external drive bay, there is a plastic
guide with four support grooves, as shown below. You select
the appropriate grooves for your drive depending on the size of
your drive and where you want to locate it.
third-height drive
I
half-height drive
The third-height diskette drive that comes with your computer
is installed in the grooves at the top of the bay.
Note
If you are installing a 3M-inch drive that does not have a
5Winch mounting frame installed on it, follow the
instructions that came with the drive to install the frame.
7-6
Installing and Removing Drives
Follow the steps below to install a disk drive in an external bay.
1.
Locate the following parts included with your computer for
each drive you will install:
Lt
two metal drive brackets
Ci
four retaining screws (with attached flat washers)
tl
two nuts (with attached star washers)
0 small wrench.
2.
Attach one bracket to each side of the drive, as shown below.
Loosely secure each bracket with two retaining screws.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-7
3.
Slide the drive into the bay as shown below, aligning the
bracket screws on each side with the appropriate grooves in
the drive bay guide.
4.
Guide the holes in the front of the brackets over the threaded
posts on the front of the subassembly. Then push the drive
all the way into the bay.
5.
Secure the drive to the drive bay with the two nuts.
6. You may need to adjust the drive’s position in the drive
bay by sliding it along the drive brackets. A diskette drive
(or other externally-accessible device) should extend out
of the bay and its faceplate should be flush with the front
panel. A hard disk drive should fit all the way into the bay.
If necessary, replace the front panel (as described in
Chapter 5) to check the drive’s position.
7.
7-8
When the drive position is correct, remove the two nuts
securing it to the drive bay and slide it out of the bay. Then
tighten the four drive bracket screws, slide the drive back
into the bay, and replace the two nuts.
Installing and Removing Drives
8.
Locate one of the power supply cables (labelled P1 through
P5) in the clasp on the left side of the subassembly. (You
can use any one that is available.) Align the notched corners
on the cable connector and the socket on the back of the
drive, as shown below. Then push in the connector.
9.
Locate the appropriate drive cable for the drive. If you
installed a diskette or tape drive, go to step 10. If you
installed a hard disk drive, go to step 12.
10. If you are connecting diskette drive A, use the connector
labeled FDD1 on the end of the diskette drive cable. If you
are connecting diskette drive B, use the middle connector,
labeled FDD2. If you are connecting a tape drive, use the
cable connector labeled TAPE DRIVE ONLY.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-9
Align the cable connector with the drive interface so that the
divider in the connector lines up with the gap in the
interface, as shown below. Then push in the connector.
divider
11. To remove the slot cover for the drive you just installed, turn
the front panel so you are facing the inside. Press outward
on the slot cover tabs, as shown below, and pop the slot
cover out.
7-10
Installing and Removing Drives
12. Locate the hard disk drive cable. If you are installing your
first hard disk drive, this cable came in the box with your
computer. If you are installing a second drive, the cable is
attached to your internal hard disk drive. Align the
available cable connector with the drive socket so the row
in the connector with the blocked hole lines up with the
row in the socket with the missing pin, as shown below.
The push in the connector.
Note
If you are installing your first IDE hard disk drive, you
must also connect the hard disk drive cable connector to
the HDD socket on the main system board. See the main
system board illustration in Chapter 6 to locate the
connector. Be sure to thread the cable through the clasp
on the left side of the subassembly.
13. Replace the computer’s front panel and cover as described in
Chapter 5; then see “Post-installation Setup” on page 5-12
to update your configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-11
Removing a Drive
Follow these steps to remove a drive from the external drive
bay:
1. Disconnect the power supply and drive cables from the back
of the drive you want to remove, as shown below.
2. Use the small wrench to remove the two nuts securing the
metal drive brackets to the front of the drive bay, as shown
below.
7-12
Installing and Removing Drives
3.
Grasp the front of the drive and pull it out.
Note
If you remove an IDE hard disk drive from the external
bay and it is your only hard disk drive, you must also
remove the hard disk drive cable from its connector on
the main system board. First remove the cable from the
clasp on the left side of the subassembly. Then
disconnect the cable from the main system board.
4.
If the drive you removed was accessible from the front of
the computer, you need to reinstall the front panel slot
cover for that drive.
Turn the front panel so you are facing the inside. Then press
the slot cover into the slot until it snaps into place between
the tabs on both sides.
5.
Replace the computer’s front panel and cover as
described in Chapter 5; then see “Post-installation Setup”
on page 5-12 to update your configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-13
Installing or Removing a Drive in the Internal Bay
You can install only 3M-inch hard disk drives in your
computer’s internal drive bay. If you are installing your first
hard disk drive, install it in the position farthest from the power
supply.
power supply
If you are installing or removing a hard disk drive in the
position next to the power supply, first remove the front panel
and subassembly as described in Chapter 5.
The following procedures explain how to do these tasks:
LI Remove a drive
CI Install a drive
tl
7-14
Connect the drive cables.
Installing and Removing Drives
Removing a Drive
Follow these steps to remove an internal drive:
1.
Disconnect the power supply and drive cables from the drive
(if you have not already done so), as shown below.
drive cable
power cable
2.
Remove the four screws securing the drive to the internal
drive bay.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-15
I
Note
If you remove one IDE hard disk drive and are leaving
another one in the system, you must set the jumpers on
the remaining drive to indicate that you have only one
IDE drive installed. Remove the other drive following
steps 1 and 2, above; then see page 7-4 or the
documentation that came with your hard disk drive for
instructions on setting the jumpers.
3.
If you removed your only IDE hard disk drive, remove the
hard disk drive cable from its connector on the main system
board. First remove the cable from the clasp on the left side
of the subassembly. Then disconnect the cable from the
main system board connector.
4.
If you need to connect the drive cable on your remaining
drive, see “Connecting the Cables,” below.
Installing a Drive
Follow these steps to install a new drive (or reinstall a drive
you removed):
1.
7-16
Position the drive so its mounting screw holes face the
outside of the drive bay and its power supply and drive
connectors face the front of the subassembly, as shown in
the following illustration. Then lower the drive into the bay.
Installing and Removing Drives
connectors
%
2.
Adjust the drive’s position so that the four holes on the drive
are aligned with the corresponding holes in the drive bay.
Then secure the drive with four retaining screws.
3.
Connect the drive and power supply cables, as described
below.
Installing and Removing Drives
7-17
Connecting the Cables
Follow these steps to connect the drive and power supply
cables:
1.
If the subassembly is out of the computer, follow the steps
in Chapter 5 to replace it.
2.
Locate one power supply cable for each drive you installed
in the internal drive bay. You can use any of the free cables
labeled P1 through P5. If you removed the subassembly
earlier, also reconnect the power supply cables to the
drive(s) in the external drive bay.
Align the notched corners of the cable connector with the
notched corners of the drive socket, as shown below. Then
push in the connector.
3.
Locate the cable for each drive installed in the internal drive
bay. (If you removed the subassembly earlier, also
reconnect the drive cables to the drive(s) in the external
bay. See page 7-9 for instructions on connecting a diskette
drive cable.)
If you are installing your first hard disk drive, use the cable
included with your computer.
7-18
Installing and Removing Drives
If you are installing your second drive, the cable is already
attached to your other drive; use the second connector on
that cable. Connect the cable as described below; then skip
to step 5.
To connect the cable, align the cable connector with the drive
interface so the row in the connector with the blocked hole
lines up with the row in the interface with the missing pin,
as shown below. Then push in the connector.
missing pin
Installing and Removing Drives
7-19
4.
If you are installing your first hard disk drive, you also
need to connect the drive cable to the main board. The hard
disk drive socket is labeled HDD and is located to the right
of the memory card. Connect the cable to the HDD socket,
matching the notch on the socket to the tab on the cable.
notch
tab
If you have difficulty reaching the socket, you can remove the
memory card; just be sure to reinstall it before you go on to
step 5.
5.
7-20
Replace the computer’s front panel and cover as described in
Chapter 5; then see “Post-installation Setup” on page 5-12
to update your configuration.
Installing and Removing Drives
Appendix A
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
This appendix describes how to physically format a hard disk.
Sometimes called a low-level format, this procedure should not
be confused with the logical format performed by the operating
system, such as the MS-DOS FORMAT command. Physically
formatting a hard disk is a separate step that is usually done at
the factory by the disk manufacturer.
If your computer came with a factory-installed hard disk, or if
you have installed an optional Epson IDE hard disk, it has
already been physically formatted. You need only follow the
instructions in your operating system manual to prepare your
hard disk for use.
If you have installed a hard disk that came with its own format
utility, use that program to physically format the disk.
You may need to use the procedure in this chapter to physically
format a hard disk if you have installed a non-Epson hard disk
in your computer that has never received the low-level format
and did not come with its own format utility.
Caution
If you are unsure whether formatting is necessary, contact
your Epson dealer for assistance.
Physically formatting a hard disk erases any data it contains. If
you are formatting a hard disk you have been using, be sure to
back up all its data to diskettes before you format it. See your
operating system manual for instructions on backing up data.
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
A-l
In addition to destroying all the data on the hard disk, physical
formatting removes any partitions and logical formatting
defined on the disk by your operating system. After you
physically format a new or used hard disk, follow the
instructions in your operating system manual to partition and
format the hard disk to prepare it for use.
Note
Sometimes, after a hard disk has been used for a long time,
its data becomes fragmented, causing the disk to perform
less efficiently or produce errors. If this happens, check your
operating system manual for procedures you can perform to
reorganize your data. If those procedures-or a commercial
defragmenting utility-do not solve the problem, you may
want to reformat the disk as described in this chapter.
Choosing the Type of Format
Follow these steps to display the formatting options:
1. Insert the Reference diskette in drive A.
2.
Turn on or reset the computer. It automatically loads
MS-DOS and displays the Operation Menu.
3.
Select 2 to highlight Format hard disk and press IEnter
The Hard Disk Format Menu appears on the screen:
HARD DISK FORMAT MENU
1-Format
2 - Destructive surface analysis
3 - Non-destructive surface analysis
0 - Exit
A-2
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
The formatting options work as follows:
tl
Format first scans the disk for defective (bad) tracks and
lets you decide which tracks to mark as bad. Then it
formats the disk and marks the bad tracks so they are never
used to store data.
Q Destructive surface analysis tests the entire disk
for read/write errors or unflagged bad tracks and updates
the defective track table. Because this option writes and
reads data on the disk, it destroys all data on any track that
produces an error. You cannot run the Destructive surface
analysis on a disk that has never been formatted.
Ll Non-destructive surface analysis checks the disk
for unflagged bad tracks without destroying data. You
cannot run the Non-destructive surface analysis on a disk that
has never been formatted.
The type of format you choose depends on whether you are
reformatting a disk that has been used or formatting a new disk
for the first time. See the recommendations below.
Formatting a New Disk
Many hard disk drives come with a printed list of bad tracks
but the bad tracks are not flagged on the disk. You may need to
modify the defective track table to add the bad tracks. Other
hard disks (such as those supplied by Epson) come with the
bad tracks already flagged. If you are formatting a new hard
disk that has never been formatted, select the Format option.
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
A-3
Reformatting a Used Disk
If you are reformatting a disk you have been using, follow these
steps:
1.
Use the Non-destructive surface analysis test to check for
unflagged bad tracks.
2.
If errors occur during the Non-destructive surface analysis,
back up your hard disk to diskettes.
3.
Run the Destructive surface analysis to update the defective
track table.
4.
Select the Format option to format the disk.
Selecting an Option
When using this program, you often need to select an option
from a menu. There are two ways to do this:
LI
Use the arrow keys ( I’ L t -+) to highlight the option and
press IEnter
tl
Type the number of the option and press IEnter
You can select most options that appear on the screen using
either method.
Starting the Formatting Process
If you have more than one hard disk drive, you see this prompt:
Enter drive number ?
(1/2)
Select 1 for the first hard disk or 2 for the second hard disk.
Then see the instructions below for the Hard Disk Format
Menu option you want to use.
A-4
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
Option 1, Format
If you select Format from the Hard Disk Format Menu, you
see the following (for a disk with no defective track table):
Format Hard Disk
< Drive 1: >
Scan hard disk to get defective track
information
? (Y/N)
(If the disk already has a defective track table, you do not see
the message because the disk does not need to be scanned for
bad tracks.)
1.
Select Y to scan the disk or N to skip the scanning process.
If you select Y, the program scans the disk and displays
these messages during the process:
Scanning for flagged bad tracks...
Head : nnn
Cylinder : nnnnn
You see the head and cylinder numbers decrease as the
program progresses. After scanning the disk, the program
displays the results, such as the following:
Scanning finished.
Count of tracks flagged bad
Count of tracks with other errors
Count of good tracks
2.
=
1
0
=
= 4884
Next you see the following prompt:
Accept recommended skewed sectors in
: 1 ? (Y/N)
format
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
A-5
For an Epson hard disk drive, it is best to accept the
recommended skewed sector (also called the interleave
factor) of 1 since this setting allows your drive to perform
more efficiently. For other hard disk drives, you may need
to change this value if the documentation that came with
the disk recommends a different number.
To accept the default, select Y. Then go to step 3.
To enter a new value, select N. You see the following prompt:
Enter new skewed sectors in
(1-16):
format
Enter the recommended number (from 1 through 16) which
equals the maximum sector number for the drive minus 1.
Then press [Enter.
3.
Next you see this prompt:
Accept recommended skewed sectors per
head in format : 0 ? (Y/N)
For an Epson hard disk drive, accept the recommended value
of 0. For another type of drive, use the value recommended
in the documentation for the drive.
To accept the default, select Y.
To enter a new value, select N. You see the following prompt:
Enter new skewed sectors per head
in format (0-16):
Enter the recommended number (from 0 through 16) which
equals the maximum sector number for the drive minus 1.
Then press IEnter
A-6
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
4.
The program now allows you to edit the defective track table.
At the bottom of the table is this prompt:
Modify defective track table ? (Y/N)
Select N to leave the table as it is. Then skip the following
section and go to “Formatting the Disk” on page A-8.
To add bad tracks to the defective track table, see the next
section.
Modifying the Defective Track Table
If you select Y to modify the table, you see the following
options at the bottom of the table:
Defective Track Table : Move box cursor to
desired track with cursor key
A = Add track, C = Change track,
D = Delete track, F = Finish editing
Enter command :
To add a bad track, follow these steps:
1.
Press [Al. You see this prompt:
Enter cylinder number (1 - nnnn):
2.
Type the number of the cylinder containing the bad track
and press [Enter. You see this prompt:
Enter head number (0 - nn):
3.
Type the head number for the bad track and press [Enter.
To cancel the operation, press [Enter] without typing a value.
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
A-7
When you complete a valid entry, it appears in the table and
you can add the next bad track, if necessary.
If you make a mistake, move the cursor block to the incorrect
track and press [cl to change the track data or press [Dl to
delete the track from the table. Change the track data in the
same way as you add a track.
The maximum valid cylinder number and head number (nnnn
and nn) vary according to the capacity of the hard disk. If you
enter an invalid cylinder or head number, a reminder of the
range of values appears and the program asks you to enter the
value again.
When you finish adding all the bad tracks, press m without
typing a value. Then check the entries in the defective track
table. When you are sure the table is correct, press m. The
program displays a warning about the consequences of
proceeding with formatting, as described in the next section.
Formatting the Disk
When you are ready to start formatting the disk, you see the
following warning:
WARNING! ALL DATA WILL BE DESTROYED IN ALL
PARTITIONS OF HARD DISK, NOT JUST IN MS-DOS
PARTITION!
Do you want to start formatting ? (Y/N)
If you are not sure you want to format the hard disk, select N.
If you are sure, select Y. The program gives you one more
chance to cancel:
DOUBLE
COPIES
Do you
copies
A-8
CHECK THAT YOU HAVE BACKUP DISKETTE
OF ALL YOUR FILES.
want to exit and check your file
? (Y/N)
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
Select Y to cancel formatting (and check your backups) or N to
continue.
If you continue with formatting, you see:
Format started.
Head : n n n
Cylinder
: nnnnn
The head and cylinder numbers decrease as the program
progresses.
When formatting is complete, the program flags any bad tracks
and you see a series of messages like these:
Format finished.
Flagging bad tracks...
Cylinder is nnnn, head is nn
Format completed.
Press Enter to return to the menu.
Press m to return to the Hard Disk Format Menu.
Option 2, Destructive Surface Analysis
You can perform a Destructive surface analysis of your hard
disk to accurately locate any bad tracks and flag them, if they
are not flagged. The test operates by a complex process of
writing, reading, and verifying information on every track of
the hard disk, except for tracks that are already flagged as bad
tracks.
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
A-9
Caution
If any errors occur during this check, all data on the track
that produces the error is destroyed. For this reason, if you
suspect an unflagged bad track is causing trouble, first run
option 3, Non-destructive surface analysis, to check the disk
surface.
-I
To start this test, select Destructive surface analysis
from the Hard Disk Format Menu, You see these messages:
Analyze Hard Disk
Read/Save/Write/Read/Restore/Read
check for all tracks...
Current cylinder is nnnn
As the program checks each track, it counts the cylinder
numbers (nnnn) down to zero.
When the test is complete, the program displays a disk status
report, such as the following:
Analysis finished.
Count of tracks flagged bad
Count of tracks with write, read errors
=
=
Count of good tracks
= nnnn
No write, read error was detected.
No data was destroyed.
Press Enter to return to the menu.
A-10
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
n
n
If the program finds one bad track that is not flagged, the
summary would show one track with a write, read error. The
report is followed by a table like this:
Write, Read Error Tracks
Cylinder Head
237
Cylinder Head
Cylinder Head
Cylinder Head
2
Confirm to register the tracks in the Write, Read Error
Track Table as bad tracks.
Do you want to register the error tracks as bad tracks? (Y/N)
To flag the error tracks as bad, select Y. You see a list of the
tracks as they are flagged and these messages:
Flagging bad tracks...
Cylinder is 237, head is 2
Press Enter to return to the menu.
Press m to return to the Hard Disk Format Menu.
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
A-11
Option 3, Non-destructive Surface Analysis
The Non-destructive surface analysis does not destroy any
data, and you can use it to safely check the condition of your
hard disk drive. However, this test does not flag bad tracks.
To start the test, select Non-destructive surf ace
analysis from the Hard Disk Format Menu. You see these
messages:
Analyze Hard Disk
Read/Verify check for all tracks...
Current cylinder is nnnn
As the program checks each track, it counts the cylinder
numbers down to zero. When the test is complete, the program
displays a status report, such as the following:
Analysis
finished.
=
Count of tracks flagged bad
Count of tracks with read, verify errors =
Count of good tracks
= nnnn
No read, verify error was detected.
If the program finds tracks with errors, the screen displays a
table listing them. Then you see this message:
Press Enter to return to the menu.
Press m to return to the Hard Disk Format Menu.
A-22
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
n
n
Exiting the Hard Disk Format Menu
To leave the Hard Disk Format Menu, select Exit. The screen
displays the Operation Menu.
If you formatted the hard disk with option 1 or 2, you must
now install MS-DOS (or another operating system) on the hard
disk to prepare it for use. Remove the Reference diskette from
drive A and then follow the instructions in your operating
system manual. The installation process automatically
partitions and formats the hard disk.
If you ran only the Non-destructive surface analysis, remove
the Reference diskette from drive A and press the RESET button
to load the operating system.
Physically Formatting a Hard Disk
A-13
Appendix B
Troubleshooting
You should not encounter any difficulties as you set up and use
your computer, but if anything out of the ordinary happens,
refer to this appendix. You can correct most problems by
adjusting a cable connection, repeating a software procedure, or
resetting the computer.
Besides trying these suggestions, you can run diagnostics
checks on the various components of your system. See
Appendix C for instructions. If the suggestions here or in
Appendix C do not solve the problem, see “Where to Get Help”
in the Introduction.
Identifying Your System
When you request technical assistance from your dealer, a
qualified service person, or the Epson Customer Resource
Center, be ready to provide your computer’s serial number (on
its back panel), its configuration (including the type of disk
drives, monitor, and option cards), and the names and version
numbers of any software programs you are using.
If you are able to use MS-DOS, you can obtain your MS-DOS
version number and the version number of your computer’s
ROM BIOS.
If you copied the ROMBIOS.COM file to your hard disk (as
described in Chapter 3), follow these steps:
1.
At the MS-DOS command prompt, type ROMBIOS and
press [Enter. (You may need to log onto the directory where
ROMBIOS.COM is stored.) Write down the version number
displayed on your screen.
Troubleshooting B-l
2.
At the MS-DOS command prompt, type VER and press
IEnter The screen displays the MS-DOS version number.
Write down the number so you can give it to your dealer.
If you did not copy ROMBIOS.COM or you do not have a hard
disk, follow these steps:
1.
Insert the Reference diskette in drive A and turn on or reset
your computer.
2. At the Operation Menu, select Exit to MS-DOS for
more utilities and press IEnter
3.
At the A> prompt, type ROMBIOS and press IEnter Write
down the version number displayed on your screen.
4.
Remove the Reference diskette and, if necessary, insert
your Startup diskette in drive A. Type VER and press
IEnter The screen displays the MS-DOS version number.
Write down the number so you can give it to your dealer.
Error Messages
Your computer’s built-in memory (ROM) contains a series of
diagnostics programs, called power-on diagnostics, which your
computer runs automatically every time you turn it on. These
programs check internal devices such as ROM, RAM, the timer,
the keyboard controller, and the hard disk drive.
The RAM test program displays the total amount of memory
currently installed in your system. If the computer finds an
error, it displays an error message on the screen.
If the error is not serious, you see this prompt:
(Resume = "F1" key)
Write down the error message, and press 1 to continue.
B-2
Troubleshooting
If the error is serious, the computer cancels further checking
and halts system initialization. The error message remains on
the screen and the computer locks up. If this happens, contact
your dealer as soon as possible.
Report the error messages when you request technical
assistance.
The following table lists all the error messages that may appear
during power-on diagnostics. If you receive an error message,
look it up in the table below; it directs you to the proper
troubleshooting section in this appendix. If you do not see an
error message, read the section that covers your problem.
Power-on diagnostics error messages
I
Error code
Message
Action
101
System board error
Contact dealer
102
System board error
103
System board error
105
System board error
106
System board error
107
System board error
108
System board error
System board
Real-time clock
161
System options not set
Contact dealer
162
System options not set
Run Setup; see
Chapter 2
163
Time and date not set
Run Setup; see
Chapter 2
164
Memory size error
Run Setup; see
Chapter 2
Troubleshooting B-3
Power-on diagnostics error messages (continued)
Action
Error code
Memory
171
BIOS shadow RAM error 1 Contact dealer
173
Cache options error
201
Memory error
202
Memory address error
203
Memory address error
Run Setup; see
Chapter 2
Keyboard
301
Keyboard error
303
Keyboard or system
unit error
304
Keyboard or system
unit error
See “Keyboard
Problems”
Monitor
401
CRT error
501
CRT error
See “Monitor
Problems”
Diskette drive(s) and
controller
601
Diskette error
See “Diskette
Problems” or ‘Diskette
Drive Problems”
Parallel port error
See “Printer Problems”
Serial port error
See “Printer Problems”
Parallel port (printer
interface)
901
Serial port (RS-232C
port)
1101
B-4
Troubleshooting
I
Power-on diagnostics error messages (continued)
Message
Action
1760
Disk 0 parameter
failure
See “Hard Disk Drive
Problems”
1761
Disk 1 parameter
failure
1770
Disk 0 parameter error
1771
Disk 1 parameter error
1780
Disk 0 failure
1781
Disk 1 failure
1782
Disk controller failure
1790
Disk 0 error
1791
Disk 1 error
Error code
.I
Hard disk drive(s) and
controller
Auxiliary device(s)
8601
Auxiliary device failure
8602
Auxiliary device failure
8603
Auxiliary device failure
See ‘Mouse Problems”
The Computer Won’t Start
If your computer does not start when you turn
check the following:
1.
on
the power,
Is the power light on? If not, remove any diskettes and turn
off the power. Make sure the power cord is securely
connected to both the AC inlet on the back panel and an
electrical outlet. Replace the Startup or Reference diskette, if
necessary, and turn on the computer again.
Troubleshooting B-5
2.
If the power light still does not come on, check the electrical
outlet for power. Turn off your computer, unplug the
power cord, and plug a lamp into the outlet. Turn it on to
see if the outlet supplies power.
3.
If you installed or removed any of your system components,
such as a disk drive, check to make sure you have
reconnected all the internal and external cables correctly.
4.
If the electrical outlet is working and all the connections are
secure but your computer still won’t start, call your dealer.
Note
If the computer starts but you can’t see anything on the
screen, see “Monitor Problems,” below.
The Computer Does Not Respond
If your computer locks up and does not respond when you
type on the keyboard, follow these steps:
1.
B-6
Some operations take longer than others to complete. For
example, the computer takes longer to sort a database than
to display the time. If your computer still does not respond
after a reasonable length of time, proceed to the next step.
Troubleshooting
2.
If you have just made a change in your system’s
configuration, your computer may take a few minutes to
complete its power-on diagnostics. The first time you turn
on your computer after making such a change, it can take
up to five minutes to finish its self test, depending on what
you changed. If the computer does not display the MS-DOS
prompt after five minutes, press the RESET button and try
again. If that doesn’t work, insert the Reference diskette in
drive A and press the RESET button. If the computer still
does not boot, contact your Epson dealer.
3.
Did you enter the correct password? See “Password
Problems,” below.
4.
Could your software be causing the problem? If you are
running an application program, see “Software Problems,”
later in this appendix.
5.
The problem could be caused by your keyboard. See
“Keyboard Problems,” later in this appendix.
6.
If you want to stop whatever the computer is doing and
return to the MS-DOS command prompt, hold down the
[ key and press lereakl (or press [cl). See Chapter 3 for
more information on stopping a command or program.
7.
If your computer still does not respond, you can reset it
using the [F] [F] [El command or the RESET
button. See “Resetting Your Computer” in Chapter 3 for
more information.
8.
If resetting the computer does not work, turn off the
computer and wait at least five seconds. If you do not have
a hard disk drive, insert the Startup diskette in drive A;
then turn on the computer. It should load MS-DOS.
Troubleshooting B-7
9.
If you installed an EGA or VGA display adapter card, or
another type of card that you want to be the primary
display adapter, you must set jumper JP4 to disable the
built-in VGA adapter. Otherwise, you will not see any
display on the screen. See “Changing the Jumper Settings”
in Chapter 6 for instructions.
If you are using one or more display adapter cards, you
may also need to change the setting of jumper JP6. This
jumper tells the computer whether you are using a color or
monochrome monitor. (JP6 is set for color at the factory.)
When this jumper is set incorrectly, you see a CRT error
message.
If you are using two different video cards, set jumper JP10
to the primary monitor type. See “Changing the Jumper
Settings” in Chapter 6 for instructions.
10. If your computer suddenly stops operating, its power
supply thermal detection circuits may have detected
excessive operating temperatures and automatically shut
down the power. This protects your system from damage
due to overheating.
When these circuits detect a high temperature, they shut off
all the DC outputs in the power supply and cause it to go
into latch-offstate. This does not damage the power supply,
but you must correct the temperature problem before you
can use your computer again. See “Restoring the Power
Supply,” below.
B-8
Troubleshooting
Restoring the Power Supply
To restore normal power supply operation, follow these steps:
1.
Turn off the computer and leave it off for at least
30 seconds to reset the power supply logic.
2.
To determine the cause of the high temperature and correct
the condition, check for the following:
Ci
Room temperature above 95°F (35°C). If this is the case,
relocate the computer to a cooler area.
Ll
A blocked power supply fan. Make sure there is space
around the power supply fan vents in the back and
sides of the computer case. Remove the computer’s
cover and check both inside and outside the computer
for blockage. Make sure there is ample room around
your system for air circulation.
Cl
An overload of the power supply limitations. Check the
table on page 6-8 to see if you have exceeded the option
slot power limits. See your option card manual(s) for
the power requirements for your option card(s).
3.
After you correct the problem causing the overheating,
allow the computer to cool down for at least five minutes at
room temperature (about 78°F or 25°C). This resets the
thermal detection circuits.
4.
If you removed the computer’s cover, replace it now. Then
turn on the computer.
If the power supply shuts off again, contact your dealer.
Troubleshooting B-9
Password Problems
If you have any trouble using your password, try the following:
1.
If you think you know the correct password, reset the
computer and try again. See Chapter 3 for instructions.
Note
If you enabled network server mode when you set a
password, you do not see the key prompt. For more
information, see “Using Your Computer as a Network
Server” in Chapter 4.
2.
If you know the current power-on password but you want
to change or delete it, see Chapter 3 for instructions. (You
cannot change or delete a power-on password and remain
in network server mode.)
3.
If you do not know the current power-on password and
you do not want to set a new one, see “Removing a
Password,” below.
4.
If you do not know the current power-on password and
you want to set a new one, see “Setting a New Password,”
below.
5.
If you are setting a password and you see the following
message, you need to change a jumper setting inside the
computer:
TURN OFF POWER AND CORRECT JUMPER
SETTING TO ENABLE PASSWORD CHECKING
Remove any diskettes, turn off the computer, and follow
the instructions under “Changing the Jumper Settings” in
Chapter 6 to enable the password function.
B-10
Troubleshooting
Removing a Password
If you have forgotten your password and you do not want to
set a new one, there are two ways to remove the current
password:
tl
Disable the existing password
Q
Disable the password function.
To do either of these procedures, you must reset a jumper on
the main system board.
If you are using network server mode and you remove the
password, the computer automatically turns off network
I
.
,
You should disable the existing password if you want to be able
to set a new password later without having to reset a jumper.
See “Disabling an existing password,” below, for instructions.
If you disable the password function, you cannot set a new
password unless you disable the existing password at that time.
If you do not want to use a password anymore, follow the
instructions under “Disabling the password function” below.
Disabling an existing password
If you do not know your power-on password and do not want
to set a new one, follow these steps to disable the existing
password:
1.
Turn off the computer. Then follow the instructions under
“Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 6 to disable the
password function by setting jumper JP5 to position A.
Troubleshooting
B-11
2.
Insert the Reference diskette in drive A and turn on the
computer. You do not see the key prompt.
3.
When the Operation Menu appears, highlight Setup and
press (Enter. Then see “Setting the Power-on Password” in
Chapter 2 and follow the instructions to enter a new
password. However, when you see the prompt to enter a
password, press m immediately. This clears the existing
password.
Be sure to save the password setting and highlight
** EXIT AND SAVE ** when you leave Setup.
4.
Remove the Reference diskette and turn off the computer.
Then follow the instructions under “Changing the Jumper
Settings” in Chapter 6 to enable the password function by
setting jumper JP5 to position B.
5.
If you do not have a hard disk, insert the system diskette
in drive A. Turn on the computer again. You do not see the
key prompt and the computer loads the operating system.
Later, if you want to create a power-on password, run Setup
and enter a password. The jumper is already in the correct
position.
Disabling the password function
If you do not want to use a power-on password anymore, you
can disable the password function. However, your current
password is stored. If you want to be able to easily set a new
password later, follow the instructions in “Disabling an existing
password,” above.
To disable the password function, follow the instructions under
“Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 6 to change the
setting of jumper JP5 to position A.
B-12
Troubleshooting
Setting a New Password
If you have forgotten your current power-on password and
want to set a new one, follow these steps:
1.
Turn off the computer. Then follow the instructions under
“Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 6 to disable the
password function by setting jumper JP5 to position A.
2.
Insert the Reference diskette in drive A and turn on the
computer. You do not see the key prompt.
3.
When the Operation Menu appears, highlight Setup and
press [Enter. Then follow the instructions under “Setting
the Power-on Password” in Chapter 2 to enter a new
password.
Save your password setting and highlight
** EXIT AND SAVE * * when you leave Setup.
4.
After you exit Setup, you see this message:
TURN OFF POWER AND CORRECT JUMPER
SETTING TO ENABLE PASSWORD CHECKING
5.
Remove the Reference diskette and turn off the computer.
Then follow the instructions under “Changing the Jumper
Settings” in Chapter 6 to enable the password function by
setting jumper JP5 to position B.
6.
If you do not have a hard disk, insert the system diskette in
drive A. Turn on the computer. You see the key prompt
(@mu). If you enabled network server mode, you do not see
the key prompt. Enter your new password to access the
system.
Memorize your new password or write it down and keep it in a
safe place. If you forget the password you enter now, you may
have to repeat the procedure above.
Troubleshooting
B-13
Keyboard Problems
If you are having trouble with the keyboard, check the
following:
1.
If the screen displays a keyboard error message when you
turn on or reset the computer, make sure the keyboard is
securely connected to the computer. See “Connecting the
Keyboard” in Chapter 1 for instructions.
2.
If the cursor keys do not work properly, the num lock
function may be on. When num lock is on, the keys on the
numeric keypad work only as numbers. If the Num Lock
indicator in the upper right corner of the keyboard is lit,
press [G] to turn off the function.
If you want to change the initial setting of the num lock
function, see “Using the Keyboard and Speaker Options” in
Chapter 2.
B-14
3.
If nothing happens when you type on the keyboard, see
“The Computer Does Not Respond,” above.
4.
If you still have trouble with your keyboard, run the
keyboard diagnostic tests described in Appendix C.
Troubleshooting
Monitor Problems
For monitor problems, check the following:
1.
If there is no display on the screen, check that the monitor’s
power switch is on and that its power light is lit. If the
power light is on, but you still do not see anything on the
screen, check the brightness and contrast controls.
2.
Did you run the SNOOZE utility (described in your VGA
Utilities booklet)? Your screen may be just temporarily
blank. Press any key to display the current image. If you
still see nothing, go to the next step.
3.
If the power switch is on but the power light is not, turn off
the monitor’s power, wait five seconds, and turn it back on.
Wait to see if the screen displays any text.
4.
If the monitor’s power light still does not come on, check
the electrical outlet for power. Turn off your monitor and
unplug it from the outlet. Then plug a lamp into the outlet
and turn it on to see if the outlet supplies power.
5.
Make sure your monitor is connected to the computer.
See “Connecting a Monitor” in Chapter 1 or your monitor
manual for instructions.
6.
Make sure your monitor and display adapter match, and, if
you installed a display adapter card, be sure any switches
or jumpers on the card are set properly. See “Connecting a
Monitor” in Chapter 1 and the documentation that came
with your monitor and display adapter card for
instructions.
7.
Be sure you have chosen the correct display adapter type in
the Setup program. See “Setting the Display Adapter Type”
in Chapter 2.
Troubleshooting
B-15
8.
If you are running an application program, see if you need
to set up the program for the type of monitor and display
adapter you have. Also make sure you are using the
appropriate monitor and display adapter for your software.
9.
If you installed an EGA or VGA display adapter card, or
another type of card that you want to be the primary
display adapter, you must set jumper JP4 to disable the
built-in VGA adapter or you will not see anything on the
screen. See “Changing the Jumper Settings” in Chapter 6
for instructions.
If you are using one or more display adapter cards, you
may need to change the setting of jumper JP6. This jumper
tells the computer whether you are using a color or
monochrome monitor and is set for color at the factory.
If JP6 is set incorrectly, you see a CRT error message.
If you are using two different types of video cards, set
jumper JP6 to the primary monitor type. See “Changing the
Jumper Settings” in Chapter 6 for instructions.
10. If you still have difficulty with your monitor, run the
appropriate diagnostic test for your adapter as described in
Appendix C. If the diagnostics program indicates an error,
contact the place where you bought the monitor.
B-16
Troubleshooting
Diskette Problems
If you see a diskette error message or have trouble accessing
data on a diskette, try the following steps:
1.
Did you secure the diskette in the drive properly? On a
5%inch drive, be sure to turn down the latch or press the
button.
2.
You may have inserted the diskette upside-down or it may
not be inserted all the way. Remove the diskette from the
drive and reinsert it with the label facing up.
3.
If reinserting the diskette does not solve the problem and
you have access to another diskette drive of the same type,
place the diskette in the other drive and repeat the
operation. If you can read the diskette, the trouble may be
in your diskette drive. See “Diskette Drive Problems,”
below.
4.
Check to see if you have inserted the right type of diskette.
For example, are you trying to read a 1.44MB diskette in a
720KB diskette drive?
5.
If your diskette is the right type for your drive, see if it is
write-protected. On a 5%inch diskette, there may be a
write-protect tab over the notch on its side or there may be
no notch. On a 3Winch diskette, the write-protect switch
may be set to the write-protect position or there may be no
switch. You cannot alter data on a write-protected diskette.
(Some application programs do not function properly if the
diskette is write-protected. Check the program manual.)
6.
Is the diskette formatted? A new diskette must be formatted
before you can store data on it. See your operating system
manual for instructions on formatting diskettes.
Troubleshooting
B-17
7.
You may have entered an incorrect diskette drive type when
you ran the Setup program. Run the Setup program again
to check the setting. See Chapter 2 for instructions.
8.
Did you receive one of the following MS-DOS error
messages?
Ll Disk Drive Error: Abort, Ignore, Retry?
Cl Disk error reading drive d:
D Disk error writing drive d:
If you see one of these messages, make sure the diskette is
properly inserted in the drive and then try the operation
again. If the problem persists, try removing the diskette and
reinserting it.
If the error message still occurs, you may have a defective
diskette. Use the COPY command to copy the files from the
bad diskette to a new diskette.
9. If you see no error messages but there is something wrong
with the data in a file, the operating system or an
application program may have updated the storage
information on the diskette incorrectly. This is probably the
case if you have one of these problems:
Lt
Part of a file is missing
Ll
A file includes parts of other files
Cl
An expected output file is missing.
Use CHKDSK to make the necessary repairs; see your
MS-DOS manuals for instructions.
B-18
Troubleshooting
Diskette Drive Problems
If you see a diskette error message or have difficulty with a
diskette drive, follow these steps:
1.
Try running the Diskette drives and controller diagnostic
test described in Appendix C. If the diagnostics program
indicates an error, consult your Epson dealer.
2.
If you installed the drive yourself, did you carefully follow
all the instructions in Chapter 7? Review the instructions
and check all cable connections to make sure you have
installed the drive correctly.
3.
Did you run the Setup program to define the correct type
of diskette drive as part of your computer’s configuration?
(See Chapter 2 for instructions.)
4.
If you still have trouble with the drive, run the Diskette
drive and controller diagnostic tests described in
Appendix C. If the diagnostics program indicates an error,
contact your Epson dealer.
5.
If the diskette drive is making loud noises, do not attempt
any further examination of it. Contact your Epson dealer.
Note
Diskette drives may make different sounds accessing
different diskettes.
Troubleshooting
B-19
Hard Disk Problems
If you are having a problem with a hard disk in your computer,
you may see a hard disk error message. The problem could be
the result of improper installation, incomplete disk preparation,
or corrupted data. The suggestions in this section cover
problems in three categories:
Ll Installing the drive
0
Preparing the drive for use
3
Accessing data on the drive.
Consult the section that seems most likely to include your
problem. For example, if you suddenly cannot use data on your
disk, see “Accessing Data on the Drive.”
Caution
If your hard disk has data on it, be very careful performing
any procedure that may erase data (such as formatting the
disk). Always be sure to back up your data before you
reformat or repartition the disk drive. Consult your dealer if
you have any questions.
Installing the Drive
If you have problems with a newly-installed drive, check the
following:
1.
If your dealer installed the drive, consult that person about
the problem.
B-20 Troubleshooting
2.
If you installed the hard disk in your computer yourself,
did you carefully follow all the instructions in Chapter 7?
Review the instructions and check all cable connections to
make sure you installed it correctly. Also check the jumper
settings on your drive to make sure they are set correctly.
3.
If you installed a non-Epson hard disk drive, was it
physically formatted by the manufacturer? A blank, new
hard disk must be physically formatted (or initialized)
before you can partition it and install an operating system
on it. If your drive was not physically formatted, you must
do it yourself. If the drive came with its own format utility,
use that program; if not, follow the instructions in
Appendix A.
Note that a physical format is different from the softwarebased logical formatting commands (such as the MS-DOS
SELECT or FORMAT commands). If you’re sure your hard
disk has had a physical format, see “Preparing the Drive,”
below, for more information.
Preparing the Drive
Before you can store data on a new hard disk (which has
already been physically formatted), you must prepare it for use
as follows:
1.
Run the Setup program to define your hard disk as part of
the computer’s configuration. (See Chapter 2 for
instructions.)
2.
Partition the drive, format it for MS-DOS, and install
MS-DOS. Step-by-step instructions for performing these
procedures are provided in your MS-DOS manual. If you
are using another operating system, follow the instructions
that came with it.
Troubleshooting
B-21
If you do not prepare the drive correctly, you cannot store data
on the disk. For example, if you partition the drive and format
it for MS-DOS (or for another operating system) but you do not
copy the operating system to it, you will not be able to load the
operating system from the hard disk.
If you are sure the hard disk was installed properly and you
prepared it for use as described above but you cannot access
the drive, verify that you performed each step in the
installation process correctly for your configuration.
If you cannot identify the problem, consult your dealer.
Accessing Data on the Drive
If you have been using your hard disk drive successfully for
some time and notice a reduction in performance, the data on
the disk may have become fragmented. You may want to back
up all your data and then use a disk compaction utility to
reorganize the files on your disk. Contact your dealer for
information.
If you still have trouble with your hard disk, you can back up
your data and physically reformat the disk. Then you’ll need to
reinstall the operating system and copy your files back onto the
disk. See Appendix A and your operating system manual for
instructions.
If you cannot access data on your hard disk or you are
receiving read/write errors, the disk may have a physical
problem. Contact your dealer.
B-22
Troubleshooting
Software Problems
If you are having trouble with an application program, try the
following solutions:
1.
If the application program does not start, check that you are
following the correct procedure for starting the program,
and that it is installed correctly. If you have a hard disk and
the program is stored in a directory on that drive, make
sure you are logged onto or specifying the correct directory.
If you don’t have a hard disk, make sure you inserted the
correct diskette in drive A.
2.
Your computer can run at either high speed or low speed.
While almost all programs work properly at the faster
speed, some must run at the slower speed. Check your
software manual to see if this is the case, and change the
processor speed if necessary. See “Changing the Processor
Speed” in Chapter 4 for instructions and information on
using copy-protected programs.
3.
If you entered an MS-DOS command that you want to stop,
there are special key combinations you can type to cancel
the command. These methods may also work in your
application programs:
4.
0
Hold down the m key and press Ic]
tl
Hold down the m key and press lereak].
An application program can occasionally lock the computer,
making it unresponsive to keyboard commands. If your
computer does not respond when you type on the
keyboard, you can reset it. Follow the instructions in
Chapter 3.
Troubleshooting
B-23
5.
If resetting the computer does not help, remove any
diskettes, turn off your system, wait five seconds, and turn
it back on. Then restart your application program.
If none of these solutions solve your software problem, contact
the software manufacturer for technical support.
Printer Problems
Below are some general steps to follow if you are having
difficulty with your printer. If the problem persists and you
need more detailed information, check your printer manual.
You see a port error message if you are having trouble with the
port to which your printer is connected. If your printer uses the
parallel port, you may see error 901; if your printer uses the
serial port, you may see error 1101.
1.
If your printer does not work at all, check that the printer
has power and is properly connected to the computer.
(Also, make sure your printer has paper in it.> See
Chapter 1 or your printer manual for instructions.
2.
Check the printer’s DIP switch or control panel settings.
These settings help a printer communicate properly with
the computer. See your printer manual for the correct
settings.
3.
If you are using more than one parallel port or more than
one serial port, the computer must know which port is
the primary port and which is the secondary port. See
Chapter 2 for instructions on how to set the parallel and
serial ports using the Setup program.
B-24 Troubleshooting
4.
If your printer is properly set up but is still not functioning,
test it from the MS-DOS level. When the screen displays the
MS-DOS command prompt (such as C> or A>), hold down
[ and press [Print]. This should print the contents of
the screen on your printer.
If it does not, you may need to change the internal setting
of the computer’s parallel port for a parallel printer (or
serial port for a serial printer). To do this, use the MS-DOS
MODE or SETMODE command. See your printer and
MS-DOS manuals for more details.
5.
Many application programs (such as word processors)
must be set up properly before they can use a printer.
Check your program manual to see what customizing may
be required.
6.
If you are using an application program that requires a
printer driver, make sure the correct driver is installed. See
your application program manual for instructions. Also see
your printer manual for additional instructions on using
your printer with application programs.
7.
Try running the Parallel port (printer interface) diagnostic
test if you have a parallel printer, or the Serial port
(RS-232C) test if you have a serial printer. Appendix C
describes these tests. If the test indicates an error, contact
your printer dealer.
Troubleshooting
B-25
Option Card Problems
If you install an option card and it does not function properly,
check the following:
B-26
1.
Is the option card installed correctly? Make sure it is
well-seated in its slot. Check the installation procedure
described in Chapter 6 and also see the instructions that
come with the card.
2.
Did you set the necessary DIP switches or jumpers on the
option card? See the card’s manual for instructions.
3.
Did you set the necessary jumpers on the main system
board? See Chapter 6 for more information.
4.
Did you run the Setup program to redefine your computer’s
configuration after installing the card? See Chapter 2.
5.
Did you install a network option card in your computer?
Some network option cards require your computer to
generate an early input/output ready signal to operate
properly. If you have trouble using your network card, set
jumper JP15 on the main system board to position A to
enable the early input/output ready signal. Then try using
the network card again. If it still does not operate correctly,
contact your dealer.
6.
If you used the option card to add an external device to
your computer, did you use the proper cable to connect the
device to the connector on the back panel?
7.
Did you perform the correct setup procedures for the
software you are using with the option card? See your
option card or software manual for instructions.
Troubleshooting
Mouse Problems
If you are having a problem with your mouse or you see an
auxiliary device error message, check the following:
LI
Make sure the mouse cable is securely connected to the
mouse port and not the keyboard port. The mouse port has
a special icon on the computer case. See Chapter 1.
tl
If you installed a mouse on an option card, be sure to set
jumper JP7 to disable the built-in mouse and enable the
mouse on the card. See Chapter 6 for instructions.
If you control your mouse with the Microsoft mouse driver 7.0
and the cursor is not operating properly or freezes within a
program, you may need to install the MOUSE7PT.EXE
program. Follow the instructions below.
Using the MOUSE7PT.EXE Program
The MOUSE7PT.EXE program creates an additional mouse
driver which you can load for any program that has trouble
controlling the cursor. Your original mouse driver remains
unchanged.
Follow these steps to install and run MOUSE7PT.EXE:
1.
Identify the disk and directory where the current
MOUSE.COM file is stored.
2.
Insert your Reference diskette in drive A.
Troubleshooting
B-27
3.
Use the COPY command to copy MOUSE7PT.EXE from
your Reference diskette to the directory on your hard disk
that contains the MOUSE.COM file. (See your MS-DOS
manuals for instructions on using the COPY command.)
4.
Log onto the directory that contains the MOUSE7PT.EXE and
MOUSE.COM files.
5.
Type the following and press (Enter to run the program:
MOUSE7PT MOUSE.COM newmouse.COM
(where newmouse. COM is the name you give the new
driver file.)
This command creates a new mouse driver that has been
modified to eliminate the cursor problem. When you name
the new driver, be sure to make the extension .COM.
If you included the file MOUSE.SYS in your CONFIG.SYS
file, repeat step 5 to modify MOUSE.SYS as well. Just
substitute .SYS for .COM.
6.
Before you can use your mouse with the program, you need
to load the new mouse driver into the computer’s memory.
There are two ways to do this:
Ci
Type the name of the new mouse driver at the MS-DOS
command prompt and then start the program.
Ll
Modify your AUTOEXEC.BAT file (or another batch
file) to include the name of the new mouse driver. See
your MS-DOS manuals for instructions.
Note
If you have already loaded the original mouse driver, reset
the computer before you load the new driver.
B-28
Troubleshooting
Memory Module Problems
If you added extra memory to your system by installing SIMMs
and that memory is not operating properly, check the following:
1.
Check to make sure that you set the memory configuration
jumpers (JP8 through JP14) correctly and that they match
your current SIMM configuration. See Chapter 6 for
instructions on setting memory jumpers.
2.
If the jumpers are set correctly but the memory count
displayed by the power-on diagnostics program is
incorrect, you or your dealer may not have installed the
SIMMs correctly. They may be installed in the wrong
sockets, they may be the wrong type of SIMM, or they may
not be inserted all the way. (Keep in mind that the memory
count does not include the 384KB of memory between
640KB and 1MB.)
If your dealer installed the SIMMs for you, contact your
dealer; do not attempt to correct the problem yourself. If
you installed the SIMMs, see “Memory Modules” in
Chapter 6 and make sure you have followed all the
instructions properly.
3.
Be sure to run the Setup program after you install or
remove memory modules to automatically update your
memory configuration. See Chapter 2 for instructions.
If you still have trouble with your SIMMs, write down any
error messages that appear and contact your dealer.
Troubleshooting
B-29
Math Coprocessor Problems
If the math coprocessor in your system does not seem to be
operating properly, check the following:
1.
If you have the 25 MHz model and replaced the 80486SX
microprocessor with an 80487SX chip, make sure you set
jumpers JP1 through JP3 to indicate that you installed a
math coprocessor. See Chapter 6 for instructions.
2.
Run the Setup program to make sure the math coprocessor
is listed as installed on the Exit display. If it is listed as not
installed, your dealer may have installed the math
coprocessor incorrectly. See Chapters 2 and 6 for more
information.
Caution
Do not attempt to remove the microprocessor yourself.
Contact your dealer to remove it for you.
3.
B-30
If your math coprocessor is listed as installed in the Setup
program but still does not seem to be working, test it
by running the System diagnostics program on your
Reference diskette. See Appendix C for instructions.
Troubleshooting
Appendix C
Performing System Diagnostics
This appendix describes how to test the operation of your
computer and its peripheral devices using the System
diagnostics program on your Reference diskette.
Run the diagnostics program if you are not sure whether a
device is performing correctly. The table at the end of this
appendix lists the error messages you may see during testing.
You can test the following devices, each of which is identified
by specific reference numbers:
1-System board
2-Memory
3-Keyboard
4-Monochrome display adapter and CRT
5-Color graphics adapter and CRT
6-Diskette drives and controller
7-Math coprocessor
9--Parallel port (printer interface)
11-Serial port (RS-232C port)
12-Alternate serial port
14-Dot-matrix printer
17-Hard disk drives and controller
21-Alternate parallel port
81-Parallel port (on video adapter)
Performing System Diagnostics
C-1
Starting System Diagnostics
To run the System diagnostics program, you turn on or reset
your computer with the Reference diskette in drive A. If you
start the program in any other way, some tests may produce
strange results.
To start the System diagnostics program, follow these steps:
1. Insert the Reference diskette in drive A.
2. Turn on or reset the computer. The Operation Menu appears.
3.
If the Num Lock indicator is illuminated, press [GLock_l to turn
off the function.
4.
Press 131 or use 1 to select System diagnostics and then
press ml.
When you start the System diagnostics program, the computer
checks any peripheral devices connected to the system. Then
you see a list of the devices available for testing. This list
includes only the devices that are currently installed, for
example:
DEVICE LIST
1 - System board
2 - Memory
3 - Keyboard
5 - Color graphics adapter and CRT
6 - Diskette drives and controller
9 - Parallel port (printer interface)
11 - Serial port (RS-232C port)
14 - Dot-matrix printer
17 - Hard disk drives and controller
DEVICE LIST is correct ? (Y/N)
C-2
Performing System Diagnostics
If the list correctly describes your system, highlight Y and press
IEnter If a device is missing from this list, or if you want to
change the list, press [Nl or + and IEnter Then see “Modifying
the Device List” on page C-5.
Note
If your system uses the built-in VGA adapter or an EGA or
VGA card with a color monitor, your device list should
include item 5, Color graphics adapter and CRT. If your
system uses the built-in VGA adapter or an EGA or VGA
card with a monochrome monitor, your device list should
include item 4, Monochrome display adapter and CRT.
After you confirm the Device List, you can test only those
items. If you want to add a device later, return to the Operation
Menu and reselect System diagnostics.
Note
After you install MS-DOS or another operating system, you
should always boot the computer from your hard disk or
from the system diskette to use it. When you finish running
System diagnostics, remove the Reference diskette from
drive A. If you do not have a hard disk, insert the system
diskette. Then reset your computer to make sure it performs
all the commands in the CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT
files.
Performing System Diagnostics
C-3
Selecting an Option
When you are using the System diagnostics program, you often
need to select an option from a menu. There are two ways to do
this:
tl
Use the arrow keys (1‘ 1 t +) to highlight the option you
want and then press B to select it
Ll Type the number of the desired option and press m to
select it.
For example, you may see this menu:
1 - Run test one time
2 - Run test multiple times
0 - Exit
Suppose the first option is highlighted. If you want to select
that option, just press m (because it is already highlighted).
If you want to select option 2, you can either press [ol or [21;
this causes the cursor block to move to that option. Then press
I to select it.
Note
You can press m at any time to return to the previous
menu.
C-4
Performing System Diagnostics
Modifying the Device List
If an installed device is missing from the Device List, you can
add it to the list for testing. At the following prompt, select N.
DEVICE LIST is correct ? (Y/N)
You see this menu:
1 - Add device
2 - Delete device
0 - Finish modification
To add a device to the list, select 1. The program displays a list
of other devices that are not currently included in the Device
List. You see a menu similar to this:
Additional DEVICE LIST
4 7 12 21 81 -
Monochrome display adapter and CRT
Math coprocessor
Alternate serial port
Alternate parallel port
Parallel port (on video adapter)
0 - Exit to DEVICE LIST
Highlight the item you wish to add and press IEnter You can
add as many devices as necessary. When the Device List is
complete, select 0 (Exit).
To remove a device from the list, select 2 (Delete device). The
screen displays the current Device List. Select the item you
wish to delete. You can delete as many devices as necessary.
When the Device List is correct, select 0. The screen displays
the modified Device List for a final check. If the list is correct,
select 0 (Finish modification).
Performing System Diagnostics
C-5
Selecting a Test
From the Device List, select the device you wish to test. Before
the test begins, the program asks how many times to perform
the test. You see this menu:
Number of
times to test device
1 - Run test one time
2 - Run test multiple times
0 - Exit
You can specify that the test be performed any number of times
in the range 1 to 9999. Running a test multiple times is for
reliability testing of essential functions only; in most cases,
running a test once is sufficient.
To perform the test once, select 1. The program may display a
submenu of tests for the device you selected.
To perform the test multiple times, select 2. You see this
prompt:
Terminate checking if an error detected ?
(Y/N)
Select Y to terminate checking if the device produces an error,
or N to repeat the tests regardlessof an error. You see this
prompt:
Repeat times (1-9999) ? 1
To perform the test once, press ml. To run the test more
than once, type the number of times and press IEnter
C-6
Performing System Diagnostics
For some devices, the computer does not display a submenu of
tests to choose from. Instead, it performs all the tests that do not
require you to enter a response. If you chose to test the device
more than once, the computer runs all the tests and then
repeats them in the same order.
You may see this message on the screen during the tests:
On errors, press any key to stop
If you see an error while one of the tests is running, press any
key to terminate the test.
Resuming From an Error
If an error occurs during a test, the test stops at that point, and
an error message appears. If you want to record the problem,
you can print the message using your printer. You see this
prompt:
Do you want a printout of the error
message(s) ? (Y/N)
To continue without printing the error message, select N.
Before you request a printout, be sure your printer is ready and
contains paper. Then select Y. If the printer is not ready, the
following message and prompt appear:
Printer is not installed correctly.
Install correctly before entering.
Continue ? (Y/N)
Correct the problem and select Y to continue printing, or select
N to cancel printing.
Performing System Diagnostics
C-7
After printing the error message, the program displays this
prompt:
P r i n t o u t i s f i n i s h e d . Press ENTER to return
to the menu.
The program continues after an error in one of the following
ways:
Q
It returns to the Device List
0
If you are running multiple tests and are not terminating on
an error, the program repeats the test that caused the error.
The table below lists the tests you can run on your system.
You may not see all of the tests listed when you run System
diagnostics; some tests appear only if you have installed the
device.
Tests that check the operation of parallel or serial ports require
you to use a special connector in order to test the port. Contact
your dealer to obtain the connector.
For a complete list of the error messages these tests may
display, see the table at the end of this appendix.
System diagnostics tests
Device
C-8
Tests available
Description
System board
Checks the
microprocessor
Memory
Checks all memory and
displays a memory
count
Keyboard
Tests all keys on the
keyboard
Performing System Diagnostics
System diagnostics tests (continued)
Device
Tests available
Description
Monochrome
display adapter
and CRT
Adapter check
Attribute check
Character set check
Graphics mode check
Screen paging check
Video check
Sync check
Run all above checks
Tests all types of
monochrome monitors
Color graphics
adapter and CRT
Adapter check
Attribute check
Character set check
Graphics mode check
Screen paging check
Light pen check
Video check
Sync check
Run all above checks
Tests all types of color
monitors
Diskette drive(s) and
controller
Sequential seek check
Random seek check
Write, read check
Disk change check
Run all above checks
Tests operation of the
diskette drive(s):
requires a formatted
diskette for some tests
Math coprocessor
Tests the operation of
the math coprocessor
Parallel port (printer
interface)
Tests the primary
parallel port: requires a
loop-back connector
(contact your dealer)
Serial port (RS-232C)
Tests the primary serial
port; requires a
loop-back connector
(contact your dealer)
Alternate serial port
Tests the secondary
serial port; similar to
primary serial port test
Performing System Diagnostics
C-9
System diagnostics tests (continued)
Device
Tests available
Tests the operation of a
dot matrix printer in
several modes; requires
the printer to be
loaded with paper
Dot matrix printer
L
Hard disk drive(s)
and controller
Alternate parallel
port
L
L
Seek check
Write, read check
Read, verify check
Run all above checks
Tests the operation of
the hard disk drive(s)
Tests the secondary
parallel port; similar to
primary parallel port test
Tests the parallel port
included on a video
adapter; requires a
loop-back connector
(contact your dealer)
Parallel port on a
video adapter
L
Description
L
Error Messages
The following table lists all the error messages that may appear
during System diagnostics testing.
System diagnostics error messages
Error code
Message
System board
C-10
101
CPU error
102
ROM checksum error
103
Timer counter register error
104
Timer counter error
105
Refresh error
106
DMA page register error
Performing System Diagnostics
System diagnostics error messages (continued)
Error code
Message
System board (continued)
107
Keyboard controller timeout error
108
Keyboard controller self diagnostic error
108
Keyboard controller write command error
109
Interrupt controller error
110
CMOS shutdown byte error
111
CMOS battery error
112
CMOS checksum error
113
CPU instruction error
114
Protect mode error 1
115
Protect mode error 2
Memory
201
Memory parity error
Keyboard
301
Keyboard controller error, keyboard error
302
Keyboard is non-standard, or keyboard is
defective
Monochrome display adapter and CRT
401
Error in adapter check
402
Video signal error
403
/ Error in attribute check
404
Error in character set check
406
Error in graphics mode check
408
Error in screen paging check
409
Error in light pen check
410
Error in video check
411
Error in sync check
Performing System Diagnostics
C-11
System diagnostics error messages (continued)
Error code
Message
Color graphics adapter and CRT
501
Error in adapter check
503
Error in attribute
504
Error in character set check
506
Error in color graphics check
508
Error in screen paging check
509
Error in light pen check
510
Error in color video check
511
Error in sync check
Diskette drive(s) and controller
601
Diskette drive controller error
602
Sequential seek error
603
Random seek error
604
Write error
605
Read error
606
Disk change check remove error
607
Disk change check insert error
Math coprocessor
701
Coprocessor not installed
702
Coprocessor initialize error
703
Coprocessor invalid operation mask error
704
Coprocessor st field error
705
Coprocessor comparison error
706
Coprocessor zero divide mask error
707
Coprocessor addition error
708
Coprocessor subtraction error
709
Coprocessor multiplication error
C-12 Performing System Diagnostics
System diagnostics error messages (continued)
Message
Error code
Math coprocessor (continued)
Coprocessor precision error
710
Parallel port (printer interface)
Error pin p
901
Serial port (RS-232C port)
1101
control signal always low
1101
control signal always high
1102
Timeout error
1103
Verify error
Alternate serial port
d
Dot matrix printer
status
1401
Hard disk drive(s) and controller
1701
Seek error
1702
Write error
1703
Read error
1704
Head error
1705
Error detection error
1706
Error correction error
Alternate parallel port
2101
Error pin
p
Parallel port (on video adapter)
81nn
1
Error pin
p
Performing System Diagnostics
C-13
Appendix D
Specifications
CPU and Memory
32-bit CPU
25 MHz system: 80486SX processor,
50 MHz system: 80486DX2/50 processor
System speed
25 MHz regardless of CPU; for 80486DX2/50,
50 MHz speed is internal only; 8 MHz
speed is simulated by inserting wait states;
high/low speed selection through
software or keyboard command; 0 wait
state memory access at high speed
System memory
4MB RAM standard soldered onto the
memory card; base memory of either
256KB, 512KB, or 640KB, selectable
through jumpers; memory expandable
using 256KB or 1MB SIMMs up to 16MB
(maximum); SIMMs must be 80ns (or
faster) access speed
ROM
128KB (includes system and VGA BIOS)
Shadow RAM
0 wait state access speed; automatically
copies both ROM BIOS and video ROM
into RAM
Math coprocessor
Standard for 50 MHz model; on 25 MHz
model, 80486SX microprocessor can be
replaced with optional 80487SX chip
Clock/calendar
Real-time clock, calendar, and 50-byte
CMOS RAM; battery backup
Cache controller
82385 (25 MHz) standard
Specifications D-1
Cache RAM
32KB high-speed static RAM, two-way set
associative on main system board;
8KB integrated into microprocessor
Speaker
Internal, programmable; volume selectable
by software
Controllers
Diskette
Supports up to two diskette drives in any
of four formats: 5?&inch, high-density,
1.2MB; 5?&inch, double-density, 360KB;
3Winch, high-density, 1.44MB; or
3M-inch, double-density, 720KB; also
supports optional Epson tape drive;
controller on main system board
Hard disk
Supports up to two drives; embedded
controller; interface on main system board
Interfaces
Monitor
VGA adapter with 1MB of video memory
built into main system board;
non-interlaced mode only; supports up to
800 x 600 or 1024 x 768 (non-interlaced)
pixels in 16 colors or up to 640 x 480 pixels
in 256 colors; multi-frequency monitor
required for resolutions over 640 x 480
15-pin D-shell connector
D-2
Serial
RS-232C, programmable, asynchronous;
9-pin, D-shell connector
Parallel
Standard 8-bit parallel, monodirectional;
25-pin, D-shell connector
Specifications
Auxiliary
Mini DIN, 6-pin connector for PS/2
compatible mouse or other device
Keyboard
Mini DIN, 6-pin connector for PS/2
compatible keyboard
Option slots
Six standard ISA compatible input/output
expansion slots (five 16-bit and one 8-bit);
8 MHz bus speed
Speaker
Internal; operation controllable by software
Power Supply
Type
Input ranges
200W, fan-cooled, automatic input voltage
sensing, thermally protected
98 to 132 VAC and 195 to 264 VAC,
47 to 63 Hz
Maximum outputs +5 VDC at 22 Amps, +12 VDC at 6.8 Amps
-12 VDC at .50 Amps, -5 VDC at .50 Amps
Option slotpower limits
~~
Mass Storage Bays
Up to five drives maximum; two
half-height or one full-height internal
drives; one third-height and two
half-height or one third-height and one
full-height externally-accessible drives
Specifications D-3
Keyboard
Detachable, two position, 101/102 sculpted keys
(country-dependent)
Layout
58-key QWERTY main keyboard;
17-key numeric/cursor pad; 10 cursor
keys; additional 4-key cursor pad;
16 function keys (user-definable)
Function
Four levels (normal, shift, control,
alternate); user-definable
Environmental Requirements
Condition
Operating range
Non-operating
range
Storage range
Temperature
41° to 95° F
(5° to 35° C)
-4° to 140° F
(-20° to 60° C)
-4° to 140° F
(-20° to 60° C)
Humidity
(noncondensing)
20% to 80%
10% to 90%
10% to 90%
Altitude
-330 to 9900 ft
(-100 to 3000 m)
-330 to 11880 ft
(-100 to 3600 m)
-330 to 39600 ft
(-100 to 12000 m)
Maximum
wet bulb
68° F (20° C)
104° F (40° C)
134° F (57° C)
Physical Characteristics
Width
17 inches (432 mm)
Depth
16 inches (406 mm)
Height
6 inches (153 mm)
Weight
Single diskette drive model
(without keyboard): 26 lb (11.8 kg)
D-4 Specifications
Power Source Requirements
120 Volt power source requirements
AC plug
Plug Type
Reference
standards
Power cord
North America
125V, 10A
ANSI C73.11,
NEMA 5-15-P
IEC 83
UL/CSA Listed,
Type SJT.
no. 18/3AWG.
or
no. 16/3AWG,
or <HAR>
300V, 10A or 13A
Plug type
Reference
standards
Power cord
Europe
240V, 10A to
16A
CEE 7/7
IEC 83
IEC 127
HD21
<HAR>
1.00 mm2
300V. 10A
UK
240V. 10A
BS 1362
BS 1363A
IEC 83
IEC 127
HD 21
EN 60 320-1
ASTA mark
<HAR>
1.00 mm’
300V, 10A
Australia
240V. 10A
ASC112
IEC 127
HD 21
<HAR>
1.00 mm2
300V, 10A
ANSI
C73.20.
NEMA
6-15-P,
IEC 83
UL 198.6
UL/CSA Listed
Type SJT
no. 18/3AWG.
300V, 10A
240 Volt power source requirements
AC plug
1
North Americ a
240V, 15A
Specifications D-5
System Memory Map
16MB
(Maximum system
memory on SIMMs)
02000000h
Extended memory
1MB
OO1OOOOOh
System BIOS ROM: 64KB*
000F0000h
c
VGA BIOS: 32KB*
000E0000h
c
Available
000D0000h
t
Available
000C0000h
Video memory: 64KB (MDA or CGA)
000B0000h
c
Video memory: 64KB (EGA or VGA)
640KB
000A0000h
Conventional system memory: 640KB
00000000h
l
D-6
The system BIOS and VGA BIOS are contained in one 128KB EPROM. The
64KB system BIOS and 32KB VGA BIOS ROM are shadowed in RAM after
the system completes power-on diagnostics. The system and VGA BIOS
ROM area in the 000E0000h through 000F0000h range is shadowed at
000E0000h after the system completes power-on diagnostics.
Specifications
Glossary
Address
A number or name that identifies the location where
information is stored in a computer’s memory.
Analog monitor
A monitor that generates, responds to, or acts upon analog
data. Analog data is transmitted by varying the voltage levels
in a continuous current.
Application program
A software program designed to perform a specific task, such
as a word processing or spreadsheet program.
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A
standardized coding system for representing characters, such
as numbers, letters, and graphic symbols. An ASCII character
occupies one byte of storage. Many different computers,
printers, and programs can use files transmitted in ASCII code.
Asynchronous
A method of data transmission in which one machine sends
data one character at a time to another machine at irregular
intervals that do not need to be synchronized to a timing device.
AUTOEXEC.BAT file
The batch file that is executed automatically when you load
MS-DOS. See also Batch file.
Glossary 1
Automatic speed
The feature that enables the computer to switch automatically
from high speed to low speed when accessing a diskette drive.
Backup
An extra copy of a program, data file, or disk, that is created in
the event your working copy is damaged or lost.
Base memory
The memory in the computer below 1MB that is available to
MS-DOS and application programs-usually 640KB. Also
called conventional memory or main memory.
Batch file
A type of file that lets you execute a series of commands by
typing one command. In MS-DOS, batch files are text files with
the filename extension .BAT. In a batch file, each command is
entered on a separate line. When you type the filename,
MS-DOS executes all the commands in that file sequentially.
BIOS
Basic Input/Output System. Routines in ROM (Read Only
Memory) that handle basic input/output functions of the
operating system.
Bit
A binary digit (0 or 1). The smallest unit of computer storage.
The value of a bit represents the presence (1) or absence (0) of
an electric charge.
Boot
To load the operating system into the computer’s memory.
2
Glossary
A sequence or group of eight bits that represents one character.
Cache memory
A high-speed type of memory buffer that stores information
from base or extended memory where your system can access it
faster.
CGA
Color Graphics Adapter. A type of display adapter card that
can generate up to 25 lines of text with 80 characters on each
line, monochrome graphics at 640 x 200 resolution, or
four-color graphics at 320 x 200 resolution.
Character
Anything that can be printed in a single space on the page or
the screen; includes numbers, letters, punctuation marks, and
graphic symbols.
CMOS
Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor. A type
of low-power silicon chip.
Code
A system of symbols for representing data or instructions. Also
any software program or part of a program.
An instruction you enter (usually on a keyboard) to direct your
computer to perform a specific function.
Glossary 3
Command prompt
The symbol or message that tells you MS-DOS is loaded and
ready to receive instructions. The default command prompt
displays the current drive and directory. If you are logged onto
drive C, the command prompt may look like this: C : >.
Configuration
The particular setup of a group of components. A typical
system configuration consists of a computer with one diskette
drive, one hard disk drive, and a monitor, connected to a
printer.
Control code
A command (generated when you hold down [ and press
another key on the keyboard) that instructs the computer to
perform a specific function.
Conventional memory
The memory in your computer (up to 640KB) used by your
operating system and application programs. Also called base
memory or main memory.
Coprocessor
See Microprocessor.
Copy-protected program
A type of program that cannot be copied. Some copy-protected
programs require you to leave the program diskette in the
diskette drive while you are using it. Some also require the
computer to be running at low speed instead of high speed. See
also Automatic speed.
4
Glossary
CPU
Central Processing Unit. The primary unit of the computer that
interprets instructions, performs the tasks you indicate, keeps
track of stored data, and controls all input and output
operations.
Cursor
The highlighted marker that shows your position on the screen.
Cylinders
The vertical alignment of tracks in a hard disk that can be lined
up under one read/write head. The number of tracks on a disk
is equal to the number of cylinders times the number of heads.
Data
Information such as text or graphics stored or processed by a
computer.
Data diskette
A formatted diskette on which you store data files (as opposed
to program files).
Default
Any value or setting that takes effect when the computer is
turned on or reset. A default value stays in effect unless you
override it temporarily by changing a setting or you reset the
default value itself.
Device
A piece of equipment that is part of a computer system and
performs a specific task, such as a disk drive, a monitor, or a
printer.
Glossary 5
Device driver
A file containing instructions that allow your computer to
recognize and control a device.
Diagnostics
The tests and procedures the computer performs to check its
internal circuitry and set up its configuration.
DIP switch
Dual Inline Package switch. A small switch on a computer,
option card, or printer that controls a particular function.
Directory
A list of files stored in a particular area on a disk; part of a
structure for organizing files into groups. A directory listing
shows the name, location, and size of the files in the directory.
A directory can contain both files and subdirectories.
Disk
The collective term for diskettes and hard disks.
Disk drive
The physical device that allows the computer to read from and
write to a disk. A diskette drive has a disk slot into which you
insert a diskette. A hard disk is sealed inside a protective unit.
Diskette
A flat piece of flexible plastic coated with magnetic material
used to store data permanently.
6
Glossary
Display adapter card
A circuit board that can be installed in one of the computer’s
option slots to provide the monitor interface. The display
adapter card controls the way the monitor displays text and
graphics. (In this computer, a VGA display adapter is built into
the system board.) Also called Video card.
DOS
Disk Operating System. A commonly used operating system
that controls the computer’s input and output functions. See
also Operating system.
Double-density
A type of diskette format that allows you to store twice as
much data as the standard-density format. A 5Winch
double-density diskette can store 360KB of data. A 3M-inch
double-density diskette can store 720KB of data.
Drive designator
The letter name of a disk drive, followed by a colon-for
example, C :.
EGA
Enhanced Graphics Adapter. A type of display adapter card
that allows you to display high-resolution graphics on a
compatible monitor. It can display up to 43 lines of text with
80 characters on each line, or it can display monochrome or
16-color graphics at up to 640 x 350 resolution.
Expanded memory
Memory that specially written MS-DOS application programs
can use with an Expanded Memory Specification (EMS) device
driver such as EMM386.SYS.
Glossary 7
Extended Memory
Memory above 1MB that is accessed by the protected mode of
the microprocessor and is available to some application
programs and operating systems.
Extended VGA mode
Special features of the built-in VGA adapter available when
you are using certain display drivers and a multi-frequency
monitor. These features include 132-column text mode,
resolutions up to 800 x 600 or 1024 x 768 (non-interlaced) in
16 colors, and resolutions up to 640 x 480 in 256 colors.
Extension
A suffix of characters that you can add to a filename to better
identify it.
File
A group of related pieces of information called records, or
entries, stored together on a disk. Text files consist of words
and sentences. Program files consist of codes and are used by
computers to interpret and carry out instructions.
Filename
A name up to eight characters long that MS-DOS uses to
identify a file.
Fixed disk
See Hard disk.
8
Glossary
Format
To prepare a new disk (or an old one you want to reuse) so that
it can store information. Formatting divides a disk into tracks
and sectors and creates addressable locations on it.
Graphics
Lines, angles, curves, and other nonalphanumeric data.
Hard disk
The enclosed unit used to store large amounts of data. Unlike a
diskette, it is fixed in place. It can process data more rapidly
and store many more files than a diskette. Also called fixed disk.
Hardware
Any physical component of a computer system, such as a
monitor, printer, keyboard, or CPU.
High-density
A type of format that allows you to store more data than on
single- or double-density diskettes. A 5ti-inch high-density
diskette can store 1.2MB of data. A 3M-inch high-density
diskette can store 1.44MB of data.
Input/output (I/O) port
See Port.
Interface
A physical or software connection used to transmit data
between devices or programs.
Glossary 9
A small device that connects two pins on an option card, a disk
drive, or the main system board to activate a particular function.
Key disk
A diskette containing a copy-protected program that must
remain in the diskette drive while you are using the program.
Kilobyte (KB)
A unit used to measure storage space in a computer’s memory
or on a disk. One kilobyte equals 1024 bytes.
LIM 4.0 EMS
Version 4.0 of the Lotus/Intel/Microsoft Expanded Memory
Specification-a protocol that allows certain application
programs to use memory that MS-DOS cannot use.
Main system board
The board built into your computer containing the circuitry the
computer requires to operate.
Math coprocessor
A microprocessor that enables the computer to process certain
mathematical calculations and display graphic images faster.
In this computer, the 50 MHz model includes a built-in math
coprocessor and the 25 MHz model can be upgraded with an
80487SX chip with built-in math coprocessor.
MCGA
Monochrome/Color Graphics Adapter. A type of display
adapter that controls either a monochrome or color graphics
monitor.
10
Glossary
MDA
Monochrome Display Adapter. A type of display adapter that
displays text in only one color, such as green or amber.
Megabyte (MB)
A unit used to measure storage space in a computer’s memory
or on a disk. One megabyte equals 1024KB.
Megahertz (MHz)
A unit used to measure oscillation frequency (of a computer’s
internal timing clock). A megahertz is one million cycles per
second. Depending on the model you have, your computer
operates at 25 MHz or 50 MHz and can simulate an 8 MHz
operating speed.
Memory
The area where your computer stores data. Memory contents
are either permanent (ROM) or temporary (RAM).
Memory module
A small circuit board that contains memory chips. You can add
256KB or 1MB memory modules to the memory card inside the
computer to expand the computer’s memory. A memory
module is commonly called a SIMM (single inline memory
module).
Memory on card
The additional memory on an optional memory card installed
in the computer.
MGA
Multi-mode Graphics Adapter. A type of display adapter card
that can display monochrome text and color graphics.
Glossary 11
Microprocessor
A small version of a CPU contained on one semiconductor chip.
See also CPU.
Modem
A device that allows a computer to transmit signals over
telephone lines so it can send and receive data. Modem stands
for MOdulator/DEModulator.
Monitor
The piece of hardware that contains the screen and displays
information.
Monochrome monitor
A monitor that displays in only one color, such as green or
amber, as opposed to a color monitor which can display in
multiple colors.
Mouse
A hand-held pointing device with one or more buttons. When
you slide the mouse over a flat surface in a certain direction, the
cursor moves in the same direction on the screen.
MS-DOS
Microsoft Disk Operating System. The operating system most
commonly used with your computer. See also Operating system.
Network server
The master computer in a network which provides storage
space for the other computers connected to it. The network
server can write files to and read files from the other computers
in the network.
12
Glossary
Network server mode
An optional password mode that provides extra security for a
computer that is operating as a network server.
Non-inter/aced mode
A technique used by the built-in VGA display adapter that
refreshes all the lines on the monitor screen sequentially from
top to bottom.
Numeric keypad
The number keys grouped on the right side of the keyboard.
Operating speed
The speed at which the central processing unit executes
commands. Depending on the model you have, your computer
can run at 25 MHz or 50 MHz and can simulate an 8 MHz
operating speed.
Operating system
A collection of programs (such as MS-DOS, MS OS/2, or UNIX)
that manages a computer’s operations. The operating system
determines how programs run on the computer and supervises
all input and output.
Option card
A circuit board you install inside the computer to provide
additional capabilities, such as a modem.
OS/2
Operating System/2. The enhanced operating system by
Microsoft that provides dual mode processing and multitasking
capabilities. See also Operating system.
Glossary 13
Parallel
The type of interface that transmits all the bits in a byte of data
simultaneously over separate lines. See also Interface and Serial.
Parameter
A qualifier added to a command that tells the program what
particular conditions to look for and specifies information such
as what data you want to process and where to locate or store a
file.
Purity
A method used to verify the accuracy of data transmissions by
adding a bit that makes the total of the byte count odd for odd
parity or even for even parity.
Partition
(1) The area defined on a hard disk for use by an operating
system; (2) to divide a hard disk into separate sections or logical
drives. You can define a primary partition and one or more
extended partitions on a hard disk.
Pathname
The directory name(s) you specify to locate a file. For example,
the pathname for the file SALES, stored in the subdirectory
BUSINESS, is \BUSINESS\SALES.
Peripheral device
An external device (such as a printer or a modem) connected to
a computer that depends on the computer for its operation.
Port
A physical input/output socket on a computer where you can
connect a peripheral device.
14
Glossary
Power-on diagnostics
Tests that the computer runs to check its internal circuitry and
configuration each time you turn it on.
Power-on password
The sequence of characters you type after you turn on the
computer in order to access and use your system. A power-on
password can be up to seven characters long and can include
letters, numbers, and blank spaces.
Processor speed
See Operating speed.
Program
A disk file that contains coded instructions and tells a computer
what to do and how to do it.
Prompt
A message the screen displays to request information or tell
you what action you need to perform next. See also Command
prompt.
RAM
Random Access Memory. The portion of the computer’s
memory used to run programs and store data while you work.
All data stored in RAM is erased when you turn off or reset the
computer, so you must store any data you want to keep on a
diskette or hard disk.
Read
To move data from one area to another. For example, when you
open a text file stored on disk, the computer reads the data
from the disk and displays it on the screen.
Glossary 15
Read/write head
The physical device inside a disk drive that reads and records
data on the magnetic surface of a disk.
Real-time clock
A battery-powered clock inside the computer that keeps track
of the time and date, even when the computer is turned off.
Reset
To reload a computer’s operating system so you can retry a
task or begin using a different operating system. Resetting
erases all information in RAM.
RGB
Red Green Blue. A type of color monitor.
ROM
Read Only Memory. The portion of the computer’s memory
that can only be read and cannot be used for temporary storage.
ROM retains its contents even when you turn off the power.
Root directory
The top-level directory in MS-DOS, designated by a \
(backslash). All other directories are subdirectories of the root
directory.
RS-232C
A widely used, standard type of serial interface. You can
connect an RS-232C compatible device to the built-in port on
your computer.
16
Glossary
Sector
A contiguous section of a disk track that provides an address at
which the computer can access data.
Se/f test
The initial diagnostics procedures a system performs to check
its hardware. Also called Power-on diagnostics.
Serial
The type of interface that transmits data one bit at a time. See
Interface and ParalIel.
Shadow RAM
The feature that enables the computer to copy the ROM BIOS
and video ROM into the RAM area of memory to speed up
processing.
S/MM
See Memory module.
Software
The programs that enable your computer to perform the tasks
and functions you indicate.
Subdirectory
A directory or group of files that branches down from another
subdirectory or from the root directory.
Glossary 17
Switch
An option added to a command that modifies the way the
command works. Switches are usually preceded by a /
(forward slash). For example, if you add the /S switch to a
FORMAT command, MS-DOS installs the operating system on
the diskette as it formats it. See also Parameter.
System diagnostics
A series of checks you can perform on the computer to make
sure the hardware is functioning correctly.
System diskette
A diskette that contains the operating system and allows you to
boot the computer.
Tracks
Addressable, concentric circles on a disk, resembling the
grooves on a record, which help to divide the disk into separate
accessible areas.
UNIX
An operating system that supports multitasking and is suited
to multi-user environments. UNIX is compatible with a range
of computers, from personal computers to mainframes. See also
Operating system.
VGA
Video Graphics Array. A type of high-resolution display
adapter. The VGA adapter built into the system board of
your computer can display 16-color graphics at resolutions
up to 1024 x 768 or 256-color graphics at resolutions up to
640x480.
18
Glossary
Video card
See Display adapter card.
Write
To store data on a disk.
Write-protect
To protect the data on a diskette from being changed by placing
a write-protect tab over the notch on the side of a 5%inch
diskette or by setting the write-protect switch on a 3Winch
diskette. When a diskette is write-protected, you cannot erase,
change, or record over its contents.
Glossary 19
Index
A
AFDD program, 3-2, 4-7-9
Alternate parallel port check,
C-10
Alternate serial port check, C-9
Analog monitor, 4-13
AUTOEXEC.BAT, 2-33, 4-1 -2, C-3
Automatic configuration, 2-2
Automatic speed change, 2-13-15,
4-2 -6
Auxiliary device problems, B-27 -28
Auxiliary interface, D-3
B
Backing up data,
from diskettes, 3-1 -2
on hard disk, A-1
Base memory, 2-2, 2-12, 2-30, 6-4,
6-6
Batch files, 4-1 -2
AUTOEXEC.BAT, 2-33, 4-1 -2
Bays, drive, 7-2-3
Break, 3-5
C
Cable,
diskette drive, 7-9 -10, 7-12, 7-15,
7-18 -20
hard disk drive, 7-9 -11, 7-15 -16,
7-18-20
power supply, 7-9, 7-12, 7-15,
7-18
Cache, memory, Intro-1, 2-11 -13,
D-2
Cards,
display adapter, see Video cards
memory, see Memory card
option, see Option cards
video, see Video cards
CGA card, see Video cards
CGA emulation, 2-6 -8
Clock, real-time, 2-17 -19, D-1
Clock/calendar RAM, D-l
CMOS RAM, 2-1, D-1, D-6
Color graphics adapter and CRT
check, C-2 -3, C-9
Color graphics adapter (CGA)
card, see Video cards
Command, stopping, 3-5
CONFIG.SYS, 1-12, 2-33, C-3
Connecting,
drive cables, 7-18 -20
keyboard, 1-10 -11
modem, 1-9
monitor, 1-3 -7
mouse, 1-11 -12
power cord, 1-2, 1-13
printer, 1-7 -9
Control codes,
CTRL ALT +, 4-4 -5
CTRL ALT - ,4-4 -5
CTRL ALT *, 4-4 -5
CTRL ALT DEL, 3-6
CTRL BREAK, 3-5
CTRL C, 3-5
Controllers, D-2
COPY, 3-2, 3-14, 3-21, 4-1 -2
Copying, files, 3-2
Coprocessor, see Math coprocessor
Index 1
Copy-protected programs, 2-14, 4-3
Cover,
locking, 3-3
removing, 5-24
replacing, 5-11
CPU, D-1
CPU speed, see Processor speed
CTRL ALT +, 4-4 -5
CTRL ALT -, 4-4 -5
CTRL ALT *, 4-4 -5
CTRL ALT DEL, 3-6
CTRL BREAK, 3-5
CTRL C, 3-5
Cursor block, 2-6
Customer Resource Center
number, Intro-5
Diskettes,
copying, 3-1
inserting, 2-2
problems, B-17 -19
system, 3-1
Display adapter, see VGA port
Display adapter cards, see Video
cards
Display drivers, Intro-3, 2-6 -9
Display screen, see Monitor
Dot matrix printer check, C-10
Drive bays, 7-2 -3
Drives,
see Diskette drive
see Hard disk
see Tape drive
D
E
DATE, 2-17
Date, setting, 2-17 -19
Destructive surface analysis,
A-2 -3, A-9 -11
Diagnostics,
power-on, B-2 -5
system, C-1 -13
Diskette drive,
cable, 7-9 -10, 7-12, 7-15, 7-18 -20
configuring, 2-27 -28
connectors, 6-3
controller check, C-9 -10
inserting diskettes, 2-2
installing, 7-1 -20
problems, B-19
protector card, 1-3, 1-14
reassigning, 4-7 -9
removing, 7-1 -20
setting types, 2-27 -28
specifications, D-2 -4
types, 7-2-3, D-2
EDLIN, 4-1 -2
EGA card, see Video cards
EGA emulation, 2-6 -8
EMM386.EXE, 4-12
EMM386.SYS, 4-12
Emulation mode, VGA, 2-6 -8, 4-13
Enhanced graphics adapter, see
Video cards
Environmental requirements, D-4
Epson Customer Resource Center
number, Intro-5
Error codes and messages, 2-4-5,
B-2 -5, C-10 -13
ESPEED program, 3-2, 4-3 -6
Expanded memory, 4-12
Extended memory, 2-2, 2-11 -13,
2-30, 4-12, 6-6
Extended memory caching, Intro-l,
2-11 -13
Extended VGA modes, Intro-l,
4-13-14
2
Index
F
Files,
AFDD.EXE, 3-2, 4-7 -9
AUTOEXEC.BAT, 2-33, 4-1 -2,
C-3
backing up, 3-1 -2, A-1
batch, 4-1 -2
CONFIG.SYS, 1-12, 2-33, C-3
copying, 3-1 -2, A-1
EMM386.EXE, 4-12
EMM386.SYS, 4-12
ESPEED.EXE, 3-2, 4-3 -6
HDSIT, 3-2, 3-9
MOUSE7PT.EXE, B-27 -28
ROMBIOS.COM, 3-2, B-1 -2
utility, 3-2
Floppy disk drive, see Diskette
drive
Floppy disks, see Diskettes
FORMAT, A-1
Formatting,
hard disk, A-1 -13
physical, A-1 -13
H
Hard disk, see also Diskette drive
configuring, 2-20-26
drive and controller check,
C-9 -10
drive cable, 7-9 -11, 7-15 -16,
7-18 -20
drive connector, 6-3
formatting, A-1 -13
installing, 7-1 -20
installing MS-DOS on, 3-1
installing operating system on,
3-1
jumpers, 7-3 -5
loading MS-DOS from, 2-33
master drive, 7-34
mounting frames, 7-3, 7-7 -8
Hard disk,
parking the heads, 3-9
partitions, A-2, B-21
physically formatting, A-1 -13
preparing for moving, 3-9
preparing for use, 5-12
problems, A-2, B-20 -22
removing, 7-1 -20
setting types, 2-20 -26
slave drive, 7-3 -5
specifications, D-2 -3
types, 2-23 -26, 7-2-3
HDSIT, 3-2, 3-9
Help, where to get, Intro-5
Hercules card, see Video cards
Hercules emulation, 2-8
High resolution monitor, 2-8, 4-13
I
Identifying your system, B-1 -2
Initial num lock, 2-15 -17
Inserting diskettes, 2-2
Interfaces, D-2 -3
Interleave factor, A-6
J
Jumper settings, 6-4 -7, 7-3 -5
K
Keyboard,
adjusting angle, 1-11
cable, 1-10
check, C-8
connecting, 1-10 -11
controller check, B-2
port, 1-10, 6-3
problems, B-14
repeat rate, 2-15-17
special keys, 3-34
speed commands, 4-4-5
Key prompt, 2-9, 3-6, 4-10 -11
Index
3
L
LIM 4.0 EMS, 4-12
Loading MS-DOS, 2-33
Location, choosing for computer,
1-1 -2
Locking computer cover, 3-3
Low-level format, see Physical
formatting
M
Main system board, 6-3
Mass storage, D-2 -3
Master drive, 7-3 -5
Math coprocessor,
check, C-9
configuring, 2-2, 2-31
installing, Intro-2, 6-1 -2
jumpers, 6-6, B-30
problems, B-30
specification, D-l
MCGA card, see Video cards
MDA card, see Video cards
MDA emulation, 2-8
Memory,
base, 2-2, 2-12, 2-30, 6-4, 6-6
beyond 640KB, 4-12
caching, Intro-l, 2-11-13, D-2
card, see Memory card
check, C-8
configuration, 2-2, 2-11 -13, 2-30
EMM386.EXE, 4-12
EMM386.SYS, 4-12
expanded, 4-12
extended, 2-2, 2-11 -13, 2-30, 4-12,
6-6
jumpers, 6-4, 6-6
LIM 4.0 EMS, 4-12
manager, 4-12
modules, see SIMMs
problems, B-29
specifications, D-l, D-6
4
Index
Memorycard,
connector, 6-3
installing, 6-19
removing, 6-15
MGA card, see Video cards
Microprocessor, 6-3 -4,6-6
MODE, 1-9
Modem, connecting, 1-9
MODETEST, 4-14
Monitor,
analog, 4-13
Connecting, 1-3 -7
interface, D-2
multi-frequency, Intro-3, 1-3, 4-13
port, 1-3 -7, 6-3, D-2
problems, B-15 -16
setting jumpers, 1-6 -7, 6-4 -7, B-8
type, 1-3, 1-6 -7,2-6-9
Monochrome display adapter and
CRT check, C-3, C-9
Monochrome graphics adapter
card, see Video cards
Mounting frames, hard disk, 7-3,
7-7-8
Mouse,
connecting, 1-11 -12
driver patch, B-27 -28
port, 1-11 -12, 6-3
port specifications, D-2
problems, B-27 -28
setting jumpers, 1-11, 6-4-5
utility, B-27 -28
MOUSE7PT.EXE, B-27 -28
MS-DOS,
copying files, 3-2, 3-21-23
diskettes, 3-1 -2
installing, 3-1, C-3
loading, 3-18 -19
MS OS/2, Intro-2, 3-1
Multi-frequency monitor, Intro-3,
1-3, 4-13
N
Network server, 4-9 -11
Network server mode, 2-9 -11, 3-7,
4-9 -11
Non-destructive surface analysis,
A-2 -3, A-12 -13
Non-interlaced mode, 4-13
Num lock,
initial, 2-15-17
mode, 2-6, 2-15-17
O
Operating speed, see Processor
speed
Operating system, installing, 3-1,
C-3
Operation Menu, 2-3
Option cards,
configuring, 2-6 -9, 6-8, 6-12
installing, 6-1, 6-8-12
memory, 6-1, 6-12
power limits, 6-8
problems, B-26
removing, 6-12
testing, C-1 -13
video, see Video cards
Option slots, 6-3, 6-8-9, D-3
Options, installing, 6-1 -19, 7-1 -20
OS/2, Intro-2, 3-1
P
Parallel,
cable, 1-7 -9
interface, 1-7 -9, 2-28 -30, D-2
port, 1-7 -9,6-3, D-2
port check, C-2, C-9 -10
port on video adapter check,
C-10
Partitions on hard disk, A-2, B-21
Password, see Power-on password
Physical characteristics, D-4
Physical formatting, A-1 -13
Port,
keyboard, 1-10, 6-3, D-3
monitor, 1-3 -7,6-3, D-2
mouse, 1-11 -12, 6-3, D-3
parallel, 1-7 -9,6-3, D-2
serial, 1-9, 6-3, D-2
tests, C-9 -10
Power,
button, 1-15
connecting power cord, 1-2, 1-13
limits, 6-8
source, 1-2
supply, 6-8, B-9, D-3
Power-on diagnostics, B-2 -5
Power-on password,
changing, 3-7 -8
deleting, 3-8
disabling, 6-4-5, B-11 -12
enabling, 6-4-5, B-13
entering, 3-6 -8, 4-9 -11
jumper, 6-4-5, B-11 -12
network server mode, 2-9 -11,
3-7, 4-9 -11
problems, B-8 -13
setting, 2-9-11, B-13
using, 3-6 -8, 4-9 -11
Power supply cables, 7-9, 7-12, 7-15,
7-18
Power supply connectors, 6-3
Precautions, computer, 1-14, 5-1-2
Printer,
connecting, 1-7 -9
interface check, C-9
parallel interface, 1-7 -9, D-2
problems, B-24 -25
serial interface, 1-9, D-2
Processor speed, 2-13 -15, 4-2 -6,
B-23
Protector card, 1-3, 1-14
Index
5
R
RAM cache, D-2, D-6
RAM check, B-2
Random access memory (RAM),
2-1, 3-18, B-2
Read only memory (ROM), B-2,
D-l, D-6
Read/write heads, 3-9
Real-time clock, 2-17-19, D-l
Reassigning diskette drives, 4-7-9
Redirecting printer output, 1-9
Reference diskette, 2-1, 3-2
RESET button, 3-6
Resetting the computer, 3-5 -6
ROM, see Read only memory
ROMBIOS.COM, 3-2, B-1 -2
S
Sector, A-5 -6
Serial,
cable, 1-9
interface, 1-7, 1-9, 2-28 -30, D-2
port, 1-9, 6-3, D-2
port check, C-9 -10
SETMODE, 1-9
Setting up, 1-1 -16
Setup menu, 2-3-5
Setup program, 2-1 -33
automatic configuration, 2-2
caching, 2-11-13
clock, real-time, 2-17-19
cursor block, moving, 2-6
diskette drive types, 2-27-28
display adapter type, 2-6-9
error message, continuing from,
2-4-5
extended memory caching,
2-11-13
hard disk drive configuration,
2-20-26
keyboard options, 2-15-17
leaving the program, 2-32-33
6
Index
Setup program,
math coprocessor, 2-2, 2-31
memory, 2-2, 2-11 -13, 2-29
network server mode, 2-9 -11
parallel interface, 2-28 -30
power-on password, 2-9 -11
processor speed, 2-13 -15
real-time clock, 2-17 -19
running, 2-1 -33, 6-13 -14
serial interface, 2-28 -30
speaker option, 2-15 -17
starting the program, 2-26
summary, 2-29 -32
SETVGA, 4-14
Shadow RAM, Intro-l, D-1, D-6
SHARE, 4-10
SIMMs,
caching memory on, 2-11 -13
configuring memory on, 6-19
installing, 6-1, 6-13 -17
problems, B-29
removing, 6-18 -19
specifications, 6-13 -14
Skewed sector, A-5 -6
Slave drive, 7-10
SNOOZE, 4-14, B-15
Software problems, B-23 -24
Speaker, 2-15 -17, D-2
Special keys, 3-34
Specifications, D-14
Speed, changing, see Processor
speed
Subassembly,
installing, 5-8 -10
removing, 5-6 -7
Subdirectories, see Directories
System,
board, 6-3
board check, C-1, C-8
diagnostics, C-1 -13
diskettes, 3-1
System,
identifying, B-1 -2
memory, see Memory
setting up, 1-1-16
T
Tape drive, 7-1, 7-9
TIME, 2-17
Time, setting, 2-17 -19
Timer check, B-2
Tracks, A-1 -13
Troubleshooting, B-1 -30
TURBO light, 4-2
Turning off computer, 1-16
Turning on computer, 1-14 -15
U
UNIX, Intro-2, 3-1
Utilities, VGA, 3-2, 4-13 -14
Utility diskettes, 3-2, 4-13 -14
V
VER, B-2
VGA emulation mode, Intro-3, 1-4,
4-13
VGA port,
connecting monitor, 1-3 -5
location, 6-3
setting jumper, 6-4-5
setting type, 2-6-9
specifications, D-2
utilities, see VGA utilities
VGA utilities, Intro-3, 3-2, 4-13 -14
VGAMODE, 4-14
Video cards,
CGA, 1-6, 2-6-9
color graphics adapter and CRT
check, C-1, C-9
compatibility, 1-6
EGA, 1-6, 2-6-9
Hercules graphics card, 1-6,
2-6-9
Video cards,
installing, 1-6 -7, 6-8 -12
jumpers for, 6-5
MCGA, 2-6-9
MDA, 1-6, 2-6-9
MGA, 1-6, 2-6-9
monochrome display adapter
and CRT check, C-1, C-9
parallel port (on video adapter)
check, C-10
problems, B-26
removing, 6-12
setting display adapter type,
2-6-9
VGA, 1-3 -7, 2-7 -9
Video graphics array (VGA),
built-in port, see VGA port
card, see Video cards
Video monitors, see Monitor
W
Windows 3.0, Intro-2, 4-14
WordPerfect, 4-14
WordStar, 4-14
Write-protected programs, 4-3
WS33INST, 4-14
X
XCOPY, 3-14, 3-21
XENIX, Intro-2
Index
7
diskette
release
diskette
release
button
power
power light
TURBO speed light
hard disk
access light
optional
drive bay
power inlet
RESET
button
option card slots
\
mouse’
I
serial
keyboard
port
\
V G A Port
port
monitor
port
parallel
port
User’s Guide Update
To run any of the following programs from your Reference
diskette, you need to access the Operation Menu:
cl Setup
c3 Format hard disk
D System Diagnostics
tI
Prepare hard disk for moving.
The instructions in your User’s Guide tell you that when you
insert the Reference diskette in drive A and then turn on or
reset your computer, the first screen you see is the Operation
Menu. Under some circumstances, the first screen you see may
be the Setup Utility screen, shown below:
Exit
Display
Password
Fast boot
Auto speed
Real-time clock
Hard disk drive
Diskette drive
Serial / Parallel
If you are trying to run the Setup program, you can continue
from this screen by following the instructions on page 2-6 of
your User’s Guide.
However, if this screen appears and you are trying to run a
program other than Setup, follow these instructions to reach
the Operation Menu:
1.
Use [rl to highlight Exit; then press [Enl#l. At the bottom
of the next screen, you see the following menu:
Change settings
Exit without saving
**EXIT AND SAVE**
2.
Press I to highlight Exit without saving; then
press I. You see the Operation Menu. On this menu,
you can use the arrow keys to highlight the name of the
program you want to run and press [Enrsrl.
3. Now follow the remaining steps in the appropriate section of
your User’s Guide to use the program you selected.
Copyright Q 1992 by Epson America, Inc.
Torrance, California
Y73899200300