Mircom BPS-1100 Operator`s manual Download

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Advanced Life Safety Solutions
Advanced Life Safety Solutions
FA-265
Fire Alarm Control Panel
Canada
25 Interchange Way
Vaughan, ON L4K 5W3
Tel: 905-660-4655 Fax: 905-660-4113
U.S.A.
60 Industrial Parkway
Cheektowaga, NY 14227
Tel: 1-888-660-4655 Fax: 1-888-660-4113
Mircom 2002
Printed in Canada
Subject to change without prior notice
www.mircom.com
Installation and Operator’s Manual
LT-2016MIR Rev. 2
February 2008
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction ...................................................................................................................... 1
1.1 The FA-265 Fire Alarm Control Unit .............................................................................. 1
1.2 Codes, Standards and Installation Requirements ......................................................... 1
1.3 Technical Support and General Information ................................................................. 2
1.4 System Verification ....................................................................................................... 2
1.5 Standby Power .............................................................................................................. 2
1.6 Battery Maintenance ..................................................................................................... 2
2.0 Preparing to Install the FA-265 Fire Panel ..................................................................... 3
2.1 Unpacking the FA-265 .................................................................................................. 3
2.2 Optional Accessories .................................................................................................... 4
2.3 FA-265 Overview .......................................................................................................... 5
2.4 Planning Your Installation ............................................................................................. 6
2.5 Electrical Specifications ................................................................................................ 6
2.6 Module Current Ratings ................................................................................................ 7
2.7 Standby Battery calculation chart .................................................................................. 7
2.8 Calculation for Standby Battery Requirement ............................................................... 8
3.0 Installing the FA-265 Fire Panel ...................................................................................... 10
3.1 Environmental Specifications ........................................................................................ 10
3.2 Panel Assembly and Modules Locations ...................................................................... 10
3.3 Mounting the FA-265 ..................................................................................................... 11
4.0 Wiring the FA-265 ............................................................................................................. 12
4.1 Wiring Specifications ..................................................................................................... 12
4.2 Connecting NAC Devices (Class ‘A’ and Class ‘B’) ...................................................... 14
5.0 Panel Operation ................................................................................................................ 18
5.1 Operating Sequences ................................................................................................... 18
5.2 General Zone Fire Alarms ............................................................................................. 18
5.3 Waterflow Alarms .......................................................................................................... 18
5.4 Supervisory Zone Alarms .............................................................................................. 19
5.5 Trouble Operation ......................................................................................................... 19
5.6 System Reset Operation ............................................................................................... 21
5.7 Lamp Test ..................................................................................................................... 21
5.8 Walk Test (Installer function only) ................................................................................. 22
5.9 NAC operation ............................................................................................................... 23
5.10 Relay Function ............................................................................................................ 23
6.0 Programming the FA-265 System ................................................................................... 24
6.1 How to Program the FA-265 ......................................................................................... 24
6.2 Programming Section Descriptions ............................................................................... 26
6.3 Viewing the Event Buffer ............................................................................................... 26
7.0 Startup of the FA-265 ....................................................................................................... 31
7.1 Prior to power up ........................................................................................................... 31
7.2 Power up sequence ...................................................................................................... 31
7.3 Default Operation .......................................................................................................... 31
7.4 Programming the Panel ................................................................................................ 31
7.5 Final Verification ............................................................................................................ 31
8.0 Programming Worksheets ............................................................................................... 32
8.1 Entering Programming Mode ........................................................................................ 32
8.2 Zone Programming (Section 0) ..................................................................................... 33
8.3 NAC Temporal/Steady Programming (Section 1) ......................................................... 33
8.4 NAC Auto-silence, Strobe Programming (Section 2) .................................................... 33
8.5 Silence Inhibit and Walk Test Programming (Section 3) ............................................... 34
8.6 Waterflow Programming (Section 4) ............................................................................. 34
8.7 50/60Hz Option (Section 5) ........................................................................................... 34
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
9.0 Appendix: Table of Compatible Smoke Detectors ........................................................ 35
9.1 Smoke Detector Bases ................................................................................................. 37
9.2 Compatible 4-Wire Smoke Detectors ............................................................................ 37
9.3 Compatible Horns/Strobes ............................................................................................ 37
FCC Compliance Statement .................................................................................................. 40
Warranty & Warning Information .......................................................................................... 41
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
List of Figures
Figure 1: FA-265 cabinet with door closed .......................................................................... 5
Figure 2: FA-265 display and controls ................................................................................ 5
Figure 3: FA-265 Cabinet Overview .................................................................................... 5
Figure 4: Zone Label Insert ................................................................................................. 5
Figure 5: Panel Assembly and Modules Locations ............................................................. 10
Figure 6: Mounting Dimensions .......................................................................................... 11
Figure 7: Knockout Locations .............................................................................................. 11
Figure 8: FA-265 Terminal Descriptions ............................................................................. 12
Figure 9: Connecting 2-Wire Alarm Initiating Devices ......................................................... 13
Figure 10: Connecting 4-Wire Smoke Detectors ................................................................. 14
Figure 11: Connecting NAC Devices (Class ‘B’) ................................................................. 14
Figure 12: Connecting NAC Devices (Class ‘A’) ................................................................. 14
Figure 13: Connecting Batteries .......................................................................................... 15
Figure 14: Connecting AC Power ........................................................................................ 15
Figure 15: Connecting the Alarm and Trouble Relays ........................................................ 16
Figure 16: Connecting Optional Devices ............................................................................. 16
Figure 17: Locating the Walk Test Switch ........................................................................... 24
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
1.0 Introduction
1.1 The FA-265 Fire Alarm Control Unit
General features
•Five initiating device circuits, class B / style B
•Two notification appliance circuits, class B / style Y (Power Limited)
[can be wired as one NAC, class A / style Z]
•One common alarm-actuated relay, form ‘C’
•One common trouble-actuated relay, form ‘C’
•AUX+ power output, 500 mA max. (Power Limited)
•Unswitched common and switched common auxiliary power returns
•Integral battery charger
•Cabinet with dead-front construction
•Transformer, mounted in the cabinet
Applications
The FA-265 five zone, fire alarm control panel is listed for use in the following applications.
•Protected Premises Fire Alarm System
•And for the following types of service:
A – automatic, M – Manual, SS – Sprinkler Supervisory, WF – Waterflow
1.2 Codes, Standards and Installation Requirements
Relevant codes and standards
The FA-265 fire alarm control panel is designed to meet the requirements of NFPA 72, 2002 edition, UL 864
Rev 9, Control Units for Fire Protective Systems, and in Canada, CAN/ULC-S527-99, Standard for Control
Units for Fire Alarm Systems.
Information provided with this unit is intended as a guide. Installation of this equipment, optional system
components, alarm initiating devices and notification appliances must follow the manufacturer’s guidelines as
contained in their respective installation documents, all applicable codes and the instructions of the Local
Authority Having Jurisdiction.
General Installation requirements
Manufacturer’s documents
When installing the FA-265 control panel, refer to this manual. When installing optional system components
refer to the installation documents included with those components. When installing compatible alarm initiating
devices or notification appliances, refer to the installation documents included with those products.
Field wiring
Field wiring recommendations in this document are intended as guidelines. All field wiring must be installed in
accordance with NFPA 70 National Electrical Code and in Canada with the standard for installation ULC/S
524, the most current Canadian Electrical Code, with all relevant local codes and standards, and the Authority
Having Jurisdiction.
Compatible devices
Use UL or ULC Listed smoke detectors and notification appliances that are compatible with the FA-265 Fire
alarm control panel from the lists included in this manual.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
1.3 Technical Support and General Information
For technical support call 1-888-660-4655, or email [email protected]
For general product information visit the Mircom web site: www.mircom.com .
1.4 System Verification
The complete fire alarm system must be verified for proper installation and operation when:
•the initial installation is ready for inspection by the Local Authority Having Jurisdiction;
•any system component is added, changed or deleted;
•any programming changes are made;
•system wiring has been altered or repaired;
•system failure due to external influences such as lightning, water damage or extended power outages has
occurred.
1.5 Standby Power
The FA-265 provides standby battery support for lead-acid rechargeable batteries. The required capacity of
the standby batteries must be calculated using the charts and tables within this manual for the period as
required by national or local codes and standards. Even though the calculation table within this manual
includes a safety margin, lead-acid batteries commonly used for standby can have variable capacity as a
result of age and ambient conditions. Periodic inspection for damage and the batteries’ ability to support the
attached equipment is highly recommended.
1.6 Battery Maintenance
The two 12V sealed lead-acid batteries should be replaced after each period of 3 to 5 years of normal service.
If the Battery Trouble indicator activates, obtain required service.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
2.0 Preparing to Install the FA-265 Fire Panel
2.1 Unpacking the FA-265
The basic FA-265 package includes the following components:
•Cabinet with hinged door
•Display and control plate c/w display and control printed circuit board.
•Zone label insert
•Battery compartment dead front plate
•Main control PCB
•Transformer
•Installation manual
•Hardware pack
-- 2 × NAC EOL resistors (4.7 K, 5%, ½ W)
-- × Zone EOL resistors (4.7 K, 5%, ½ W)
-- 1 × Battery jumper wire
-- 1 × EGND terminal ring
-- 1 × EGND KEP nut
• Door keys (taped to outside of cabinet)
All components described above are factory assembled into the enclosure.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
2.2 Optional Accessories
Model
Number
RM-263
UDACT-286
Name
Description
Relay module
Provides 3 relays that are jumper
programmable to activate on common ‘alarm’,
‘supervisory’ or ‘trouble’. Mounts inside the
enclosure and plugs into the main board.
Dual line dialer
Communicates all alarms, supervisory and
trouble conditions to a Central Station using
Contact ID, SIA or 10/20 BPS communication
formats. Programmable using the MR-2844
handheld programmer.
Mounts inside the enclosure and connects to
the main panel using a supplied 4-wire cable
with connector.
MR-2844
RTI-265
RAM-265
4
Programmer
Handheld programmer for the UDACT-286
DACT.
Remote trouble
indicator.
Single gang plate complete with common
trouble buzzer, trouble visual indicator, ‘AC on’
visual indicator and a trouble silence / lamp test
switch. Mounts remotely to a single gang
electrical box and is connected to the main
panel via the 4-wire ‘secur-bus’.
Remote trouble
indicator and alarm
indicator
Two gang plate complete with common trouble
buzzer, trouble visual indicator, ‘AC on’ visual
indicator and a trouble silence / lamp test
switch and5 red zone alarm visual indicators
and 5 yellow zone supervisory indictors.
Mounts to a standard 2 gang electrical box and
is connected to the panel via the 4-wire ‘securbus’.
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
2.3 FA-265 Overview
CPU
FAULT
Figure 1: FA-265 cabinet
with door closed
Figure 2: FA-265 display and controls
Note: Use Security Screw provided
to meet UL 864 Rev 9 requirement
Figure 3: FA-265 Cabinet Overview
Zone Label Insert
A zone label insert is installed in the zone window area. Reach behind the
display/control panel and remove the blank insert. Zone designations can
be written directly on the insert or can be created using Word for Windows,
printed on Avery label #5167 and applied to the insert.
Figure 4: Zone Label
Insert
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
2.4 Planning Your Installation
Note: This system should be installed and serviced by qualified fire alarm installation professionals.
As a minimum, the following points should be considered to ensure that the installation will be successful and
proceed without delay.
•Consult with your local AHJ to ensure that the overall system will meet all requirements. Have your plans
reviewed and approved as required.
•Review the electrical specifications, mounting and wiring instructions in this manual and in the manuals of
all connected modules and devices.
•Using the chart in this manual, calculate the standby battery size that will meet the standby time required.
Include all components that will draw current from the standby battery when the panel is in the ‘standby’
mode.
•Determine the location of the control panel, all initiating and indicating devices and remote modules and
mark them on your system layout plan. An indicating device must be located in close proximity to the control
panel.
•Using the charts in this manual, determine the wire gauge and wire run distances for the connected
components. (initiating devices, indicating devices and ‘secur-bus’ connected components.)
•Review the programming section of this manual and determine the operating characteristics required of the
initiating zones, indicating zones and common panel features.
2.5 Electrical Specifications
Circuit / Model(s)
Primary AC
Rating
120 volts, 60 Hz. 1.5 Amps maximum/
240 volts, 50 Hz. 1.0 Amps maximum
AUX+
500 mA maximum Restoral of Aux Power shorts
requires removal of all Aux Power loading
SCOM
500 mA maximum (current sink)
COM
500 mA maximum (current sink)
Relays (common alarm & trouble)
Form ‘C’ contact, 2 Amp, 30 VDC resistive, power
limited source
NAC Outputs
24 volts, full-wave rectified DC, 1.5 Amps max. –
Power limited. (3.0 Amps total for both NAC circuits)
EOLR – 4.7K ohm, ½ W, 5%
Initiating Zone Inputs
24 VDC, 60 mA max.(in alarm) – Supervisory
current: 6.0 mA – max. Loop resistance: 100 ohms
max. – EOLR: 4.7 K ohm, ½ W, 5%
Battery Charging Current
270mA maximum
Low Battery Trouble: 22.0 VDC
Low Battery Trouble
Low Battery Trouble Restore: 23.0 VDC
Critical Shutdown: 19±0.5 VDC
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
2.6 Module Current Ratings
Standby
Current (mA)
DC
Alarm Current
(mA) DC
Max. Alarm
Current (mA)
DC
FA-265 Control panel
130
475(*)
715
RTI-265 Remote trouble indicator
15
15
15
RAM-265 R.T.I. and remote 5 zone
annunciator
15
20(*)
40
UDACT-286 DACT
45
60
60
RM-263 Relay module(**)
0
24
24
Module
*Current noted assumes ONE initiating zone is in alarm. The “Max. Alarm Current” assumes all
zones are in alarm.
**Values shown are for all relays set for activation on ‘Alarm’. Each relay set for activation on ‘trouble’
is normally energized and on ‘AC fail’ will draw 0 mA.
2.7 Standby Battery calculation chart
All components that draw current from the panel while it is in the ‘standby’ mode (AC OFF) must be
considered for the standby battery calculation. All components that draw current while in the ‘Alarm’ mode
must be considered for the alarm battery calculation.
1. The control panel will always draw the currents as shown in the chart.
2. Typically the alarm current is calculated assuming only one initiating zone is in alarm. If it is required that
more than one zone be considered, add 60 mA per zone in the Alarm column. Consult the smoke detector
manufacture’s installation sheet to determine the standby current of these devices. Write that number in
the ‘current per device’ column then multiply that number by the number of devices on the zone. Repeat for
each zone.
3. Consult the Notification Appliance installation sheet to determine the current draw for each device
connected to the NAC. For each NAC, calculate the total current in alarm and put that number (mA) in the
‘Alarm’ column.
Note: each NAC can supply 1.5 Amps max.
4. For each added module in the system, multiply the number of modules times the module ‘standby’ and
‘alarm’ currents and write those totals in the ‘standby’ and ‘alarm’ columns.
5. Add up all the current drawn from the AUX+ output in the standby and alarm mode and put those totals in
the ‘standby’ and ‘alarm’ columns.
6. Add up all the currents in the ‘standby’ column and the ‘Alarm’ column.
7. Convert the ‘standby’ and ‘alarm’ currents from mA to Amps. (divide mA by 1000)
8. Write in the ‘standby’ time required. (24 or 60 Hr.)
9. Multiply the ‘standby’ Amps times the ‘standby’ time to get the ‘standby’ Amp-Hr. required.
10.Write in the ‘alarm’ time required in hours. (5 min. =.08 Hr.; 30 min. =0.5 Hr.)
11. Multiply the ‘alarm’ Amps times the ‘alarm’ time to get the ‘alarm’ Amp-Hr required.
12.Add the ‘standby’ Amp-Hr. to the ‘alarm’ Amp-Hr. for the total Amp-Hr. required.
13.Multiply the total Amp-Hr. times 1.20 for the minimum Amp-Hr. battery required to support the system for
the selected ‘standby time and the selected ‘alarm’ time.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
2.8 Calculation for Standby Battery Requirement
Step
1
Device
FA-265
Zone 1
Zone 2
2
Zone 3
Zone 4
Zone 5
3
Standby:
130
x 1
= 130
Alarm:
415
x 1
=
x
=
x 1
=
x
=
x 1
=
x
=
x 1
=
x
=
x 1
=
x
=
x 1
=
Standby:
Alarm:
69
Standby:
Alarm:
69
Standby:
Alarm:
69
Standby:
Alarm:
69
Standby:
Alarm:
69
Alarm:
x
NAC 2
Alarm:
x
RAM-265
4
UDACT-286
RM-263
Total
Standby
Current
(mA)
Numbe
r of
device
NAC 1
RTI-265
8
Current
per
device
(mA)
Standby:
15
x
Alarm:
15
x
Standby:
15
x
Alarm:
25
x
Standby:
45
x
Alarm:
60
x
Standby:
0
x
Alarm:
24
x
Standby:
x
Alarm:
x
Total
Alarm
Current
(mA)
415
69
=
5
AUX+
6
Total ‘standby’ and ‘alarm’ current:
mA
mA
7
Divide ‘standby’ mA and ‘alarm’ mA by 1000:
Amp
Amp
8
Select ‘standby’ time required (24 or 60 Hr.):
Hr.
9
Standby Amp-Hr. - multiply 8 × 7 = (Amps × Hr.):
Amp-Hr.
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Step
Device
Current
per
device
(mA)
Numbe
r of
device
Total
Standby
Current
(mA)
Total
Alarm
Current
(mA)
10
Select ‘alarm’ time required (0.08 or 0.5):
Hr.
11
Alarm Amp-Hr. - multiply 7 × 10 = (Amps × Hr.):
Amp-Hr.
12
Total Amp-Hr = standby Amp-Hr (9) + alarm Amp-Hr. (11):
Amp-Hr.
13
Multiply the total Amp-Hr. by the safety margin:
14
Total battery Amp-Hr required to support the system:
1.20
Amp-Hr.
Select a battery with an Amp-Hr. rating that is equal to or larger than the calculated minimum Amp-Hr. battery
required.
Note: The maximum battery allowed is 26 Ah. Install batteries outside the panel box. Total “Standby”
current is not to exceed 0.5 Amperes.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
3.0 Installing the FA-265 Fire Panel
3.1 Environmental Specifications
Consider the following conditions when selecting a mounting location for the FA-265 panel:
•Operating temperature: 32°F to 122°F / 0°C to 50°C
•Humidity: 95% RH non-condensing
•Close to a source of unswitched AC power
3.2 Panel Assembly and Modules Locations
The panel comes completely assembled from the factory. Remove the lower dead front for access to the
battery compartment. Remove display control panel for access to AC connections.
Figure 5: Panel Assembly and Modules Locations
Primary AC
240V 50Hz
120V 60Hz
N
GND
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
3.3 Mounting the FA-265
Figure 6: Mounting Dimensions
Dimensions in inches
Figure 7: Knockout Locations
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
4.0 Wiring the FA-265
4.1 Wiring Specifications
Figure 8: FA-265 Terminal Descriptions
Terminal
Label
Description
Notification Appliance Circuit # 1
NAC 1
(+, –)
24 VDC, Full-Wave Rectified voltage, 1.5 Amps max.
Programmable as Steady or Temporal output on alarm.
Supervised for opens, shorts and ground fault.
Power limited.
Notification Appliance Circuit # 2
NAC 2
(+, –)
24 VDC, Full-Wave Rectified voltage, 1.5 Amps max.
Programmable as Steady or Temporal output on alarm.
Supervised for opens, shorts and ground fault.
Power limited
Auxiliary power output
AUX+
COM
24 VDC, filtered and regulated, 500 mA max., 400 mV P-P ripple, power limited. Aux
power shorts must be restored by removing all Aux Power loading.
Auxiliary common power return, unswitched
24 VDC, 500 mA max.
Auxiliary common power return, switched
SCOM
(open circuit on system reset or on 4-wire smoke detector reset)
24 VDC, 500 mA max. (Please refer to Appendix A for compatible 4-wire smoke
detectors.)
DAT
Data line for remote module communications
CLK
Clock line for remote module communications
TRB NO
Common Trouble relay, Normally Open contact
TRB C
Common Trouble relay, Common contact
Common Trouble relay, Normally Closed contact
TRB NC
The Common Trouble relay is normally energized and is de-energized on trouble.
Contacts are shown in the de-energized state.
Contacts are rated 30 VDC, 2 Amps.
12
ALM NO
Common Alarm relay, Normally Open contact
ALM C
Common Alarm relay, Common contact
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Terminal
Label
Description
Common Alarm relay, Normally Closed contact
ALM NC
The Common Alarm relay is normally de-energized.
Contact is shown in the de-energized state.
Contacts are rated 30 VDC, 2 Amps max.
Z1+
Zone 1 positive input
Zone 1 negative input
Zone output is 24 VDC nominal to power 2-wire smoke detectors. Maximum current
draw is 60 mA in alarm and is limited by the zone circuitry. Zones may be configured to
monitor both 2-wire smoke detectors and initiating devices that employ dry contacts.
(manual stations & heat detectors)
Z1-
Z2+…..Z5+
Same as zone 1 positive
Z2-…..Z5-
Same as zone 1 negative
Note: For each supervised installation wire, a separate terminal must be used.
Figure 9: Connecting 2-Wire Alarm Initiating Devices
Typical
* See “FCC Compliance Statement” on page 40 in this manual for a list of compatible 2-wire smoke
detectors.
1. Maximum 30 smoke detectors per zone (100 µA each standby).
2. Manual station, heat detector.
3. Maximum total loop wire resistance = 100 ohms.
4. Program zone as:
Type 1 - Smoke and contact devices instant alarm (default)
Type 2 - Smoke auto-verify and contact as instant.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Figure 10: Connecting 4-Wire Smoke Detectors
1. Program as zone type 01, instant alarm.
2. Maximum total loop wire resistance is 100 ohms.
Zone Wiring Chart
Wire
(Gauge)
Distance
(feet)
Distance
(meters)
18
7,690
2,345
16
12,195
3,717
14
19,230
5,861
Maximum loop resistance is
100 ohms. Maximum current
in alarm is 60 mA.
4.2 Connecting NAC Devices (Class ‘A’ and Class ‘B’)
Figure 11: Connecting NAC Devices (Class ‘B’)
Figure 12: Connecting NAC Devices (Class ‘A’)
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
NAC Wiring Chart
Maximu
m Total
Loop
(ohms)
Maximu
m
Current
(A)
18-Awg
Wire
16-Awg
Wire
ft
m
ft
m
14-Awg
Wire
ft
m
12-Awg
Wire
ft
m
8.00
0.25
615
188
978
297
1,538
469
2,500
762
5.00
0.50
308
94
488
149
769
235
1,250
381
2.70
0.75
205
63
325
99
513
156
833
254
2.00
1.00
154
47
244
74
385
117
625
191
1.60
1.25
123
38
195
59
308
94
500
152
1.30
1.50
103
31
163
50
256
78
417
127
Note: This chart is based on a minimum source voltage of 22 volts and a maximum line loss
of 2 volts thus leaving a minimum of 20 volts at the last notification appliance.
Figure 13: Connecting Batteries
Figure 14: Connecting AC Power
Primary AC
240V 50Hz
120V 60Hz
N
GND
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Figure 15: Connecting the Alarm and Trouble Relays
Figure 16: Connecting Optional Devices
See installation sheets for the remote devices for
detailed wiring and address setup.
1. Maximum of 4 RTI-265 per panel.
2. Maximum of 4 RAM-265 per panel.
Secur-bus Wiring Chart
Current (mA)*
22-awg Wire
ft
ft
18-awg Wire
ft
m
16-awg Wire
ft
m
14-awg Wire
ft
m
15
2,524
769
6,410
1,954
10,160
3,098
16,000
4,878
30
1,262
384
3,200
976
5,080
1,549
8,000
2,439
45
842
256
2,135
651
3,385
1,032
5,340
1,628
60
631
192
1,600
488
2,540
774
4,000
1,220
75
505
154
1,280
390
2,030
619
3,200
976
90
421
128
1,065
325
1,690
515
2,670
814
105
361
110
915
279
1,450
442
2,285
697
120
315
96
800
244
1,270
387
2,000
610
135
281
86
710
216
1,125
343
1,780
543
150
252
77
640
195
1,015
309
1,600
488
165
229
70
580
177
920
280
1,455
444
180
210
64
530
162
845
258
1,335
407
195
194
59
490
149
780
238
1,230
375
210
180
55
455
139
725
221
1,145
349
225
168
51
425
130
675
206
1,065
325
*See module current ratings chart for current drawn by each module attached to the secur-bus.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
To calculate the wire run distance for any gauge wire and any maximum current value, use the following
formula:
1.25
Rmax =
Imax
Amps
ohms
Rmax × 1,000
Distance =
2(wire resistance in ohms per 1,000
feet)
feet
Secur-bus Capacitance
Maximum wire capacitance for proper operation of the Secur-bus is 90 nF (nanofarad). Typical wire
capacitance for 22 awg quad cable is 20 nF per 1,000 feet. Thus, for 22 awg quad cable, the maximum wire
run distance is ((90/20)× 1,000) = 4,500 feet. Other types of wire have different capacitance values. Consult
the wire manufacturer’s data sheets for typical capacitance values.
Note: Shielded wire has a much higher capacitance value and distances are severely reduced.
The following devices may be connected to the Secur-bus. All devices are supervised. See the section Reset
Section Programming on page 29 for information on adding and deleting devices on the Secur-bus.
Devices
Description
RTI-265
External to control panel.
Up to 4 of each device may be connected.
RAM-265
UDACT-286
Mounted inside control panel. See diagram in “3.3
Mounting the FA-265” on page 11.
1. Do not run the Secur-bus adjacent to sources of high transient noise such as AC wiring,
telephone cable bundles or computer wiring.
2. If the Secure-bus must go through a high transient area, use shielded cable.
3. If shielded cable is used, the distances in the chart above are cut in half.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
5.0 Panel Operation
5.1 Operating Sequences
This section describes how the panel functions under various conditions. The choices you make in panel
programming will also affect how the panel operates. Please see “6.0 Programming the FA-265 System” on
page 24 for information on how to program the panel, and descriptions of each of the programming options.
5.2 General Zone Fire Alarms
Zone alarms have priority over all other annunciation. When an alarm occurs, the following happens:
•The corresponding zone alarm LED begins flashing, the common alarm LED turns on steady, and the alarm
relay turns on.
•If a trouble was present on that zone then the zone trouble LED turns off. If the trouble buzzer is audible
then it also turns off.
•The NACs sound in a steady or temporal pattern, depending on the option selected (see “Steady” on
page 27).
•If enabled, the silence inhibit timer begins counting down (see “Silence Inhibit and Walk Test Programming
- Section 3 (‘Battery’ LED on steady)” on page 28). If the silence inhibit timer is enabled, the panel cannot be
silenced for 60 seconds following the first fire alarm. Subsequent fire alarms do not restart or extend this
timer. While the signal silence inhibit timer is counting down, if the Silence Alarm button is pressed the panel
will sound a 1 second ‘error tone’ on the common trouble buzzer.
•The NACs remain on until silenced with the Silence Alarm button, or if the automatic alarm silence is
enabled, until the thirty minute bell timer runs out (see “NAC Auto-silence and Strobe Programming - Section
2 (‘NAC2’ LED on steady)” on page 27). If the automatic silence timer is enabled, the panel will automatically
silence the NACs 30 minutes after the last fire alarm. Each zone alarm will restart the timer, giving a full 30
minutes after the last alarm before the NACs are silenced.
• Once the NACs are silenced the signals silenced LED turns on and any flashing zone alarm LEDs turn on
steady. The common trouble LED and trouble relay also turn on and, if the NACs have been silenced
automatically, the buzzer will sound at a rate of ½ second ON/OFF.
Note: A manual signal silence will not initiate the trouble buzzer. Only the common trouble LED and
signals silenced LED are turned on.
•Any additional zone alarms that occur while the panel is in alarm will reset the auto alarm silence timer and
turn on the NACs, but the panel will not restart the 60 second silence inhibit timer.
•The zone alarm LEDs, common alarm LED and alarm relay will remain on steady until a system reset is
performed.
5.3 Waterflow Alarms
If the Waterflow Silence option is turned off (see “Waterflow Programming - Section 4 (‘Ground Fault’ LED on
steady)” on page 28), when a waterflow zone (type 03) initiates an alarm the NACs cannot be silenced until all
waterflow zones are returned to normal. If all waterflow zones return to normal after the 30 minute automatic
signal silence timer has expired, then the panel will silence the NACs.
If the Waterflow Silence option is turned on, then an alarm on a waterflow zone is treated like any other fire
alarm.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
5.4 Supervisory Zone Alarms
When an alarm occurs on a supervisory zone (type 04), the corresponding zone supervisory LED begins
flashing. The common supervisory LED and supervisory relay (supervisory relay is optional) turn on steady,
and the buzzer turns on steady. If there was a trouble on that zone, the zone trouble LED turns off. The buzzer
remains on until the trouble silence button is pressed. Once the buzzer is silenced any flashing zone
supervisory LEDs turn on steady. The zone supervisory LEDs, common supervisory LED and supervisory
relay remain on steady until a system reset is performed.
Subsequent Fire Supervisory
After silencing a fire supervisory, a subsequent fire supervisory from another zone will resound the trouble/
supervisory buzzer and the new zone supervisory LED flashes until the Silence Trouble button is pressed.
Supervisory / Trouble Priority
If a supervisory zone has a trouble and it goes into alarm, the zone trouble LED is extinguished until that zone
is restored and the panel has been reset. The common trouble LED will remain on steady until all supervisory
alarms have been restored and the panel reset. All other ‘common’ trouble indicators will operate normally.
Supervisory / Fire Alarm Priority
The supervisory zone LED, the common supervisory LED and the buzzer (in the steady supervisory mode)
function normally whether there is a fire alarm present or not.
5.5 Trouble Operation
When a trouble occurs, if there is a corresponding trouble LED it turns on steady. The common trouble LED
and the trouble relay also turn on. If no alarm is present on the system, the buzzer will sound at a rate of ½
second ON/OFF. The buzzer and trouble LEDs will remain on until the trouble is restored. If the Silence
Trouble button is pressed, the buzzer turns off. Subsequent troubles will resound the trouble buzzer.
Note: If there is no trouble present in the system then pressing the Silence Trouble button will result in a
1 second error tone.
Please see the following table for a list of system faults that will initiate a trouble.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
System Troubles
20
System faults
Common
Trouble
LED
Alarm zone open circuit – loss
of EOLR
Buzzer
Trouble
Relay
Other Indicators
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
Zone trouble LED turns on
steady
NAC open circuit or short
circuit
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
NAC1 or NAC2 trouble
LED turns on
Battery low voltage or
disconnected
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
Battery LED turns on
Signals silenced automatically
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
Signals Silenced LED turns
on
Ground on extended
conductor
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
Ground LED turns on
AC fails completely, or is low
for more than 10 seconds
(brownout)
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
AC LED turns off
Installer Programming Mode
Active
flashes
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
AC LED turns off
Loss of Remote Trouble Unit
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
Loss of Remote Alarm/
Trouble Unit
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
TLM on one or both
telephone lines (Dialer)
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
Failure to communicate
(Dialer)
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
Unsuccessful system reset
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
Loss of Dialer module
turns on
sounds ½
second on/
off
deactivates
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
5.6 System Reset Operation
To reset the system, press the ‘Reset System’ button. The panel will remove all power from the zones and the
switched auxiliary relay for 10 seconds. During this 10 second period, the buzzer will beep twice every 2
seconds.
The panel can only be reset if:
•the NACs have been silenced
•the supervisory buzzer has been silenced and all waterflow zones are restored (only applies if the Silence
Waterflow option is turned off - see “Waterflow Programming - Section 4 (‘Ground Fault’ LED on steady)” on
page 28).
If the panel is not in a condition to be reset, when the ‘Reset System’ button is pressed the panel will sound a
1 second error tone on the buzzer.
After the 10 second reset period, the panel will turn off the zone LED for any zones that have been restored. If
one or more zones is still in alarm after the reset period, the panel will activate the NACs as programmed. If
there are no alarms but one or more Supervisory zones is still ‘off-normal’ after the reset period, the panel will
sound the trouble buzzer in the Supervisory mode. If there are no alarms or supervisory conditions but a
trouble is present in the panel after the reset period, the panel will sound the trouble buzzer. After the reset
period, LEDs for any alarms, supervisory off-normal or trouble conditions will be on.
5.7 Lamp Test
The lamp test will check all of the panel and annunciator LEDs. To do a lamp test, press and hold the Lamp
Test button. All the LEDs will flash.
A lamp test will only work if the NACs are not active and the supervisory buzzer is not active. If a lamp test is
unsuccessful the buzzer will sound a 1 second error tone. If any trouble or zone has a state change during
lamp test, the lamp test will be cancelled and the panel will return to normal operation.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
5.8 Walk Test (Installer function only)
To do a walk test, all zone alarms, troubles and relays must be in their normal state. You can program the walk
test to be either audible or silent (see “Audible Walk Test” on page 28).
1. To walk test the panel press the Walk Test button. The common trouble LED flashes and the buzzer
sounds one short beep. The panel will be in walk test mode for one hour, or until you press the Walk Test
button again.
2. As you test each part of the system, the panel will give the following indications:
Trouble
Buzzer
Type of activation
LEDs
NACs*
Fire Alarm or Fire
Supervisory
Zone alarm/
Supv LED
turns on
1 squawk
Fire Alarm or Fire
Supervisory Restoral
Zone alarm/
Supv LED
turns off
1 squawk
Zone or System Trouble
Zone or
system
trouble LED
turns on
2 squawks
Sounds
Zone or System Trouble
Restoral
Zone or
system
trouble LED
turns off
2 squawks
Stops
sounding
Ground Fault
Ground
trouble LED
turns on
3 squawks
Sounds
Ground Fault Restoral
Ground
trouble LED
turns off
3 squawks
Stops
sounding
*Only if Walk Test Audible option is turned on.
Zone LEDs operate normally except that alarms do not latch - the alarm LEDs will turn off when the zone is
restored and the auto-reset has been successful.
Alarm and trouble relays are NOT activated. If used, any remote connection is not activated.
3. To return the system to normal operation, press the Walk Test button. If you do not press the Walk Test
button, the system will return to normal operation after one hour. If any zones are in alarm at the end of the
walk test, the zones will indicate silenced signals.
Note: The Lamp Test button does not work while the panel is in Walk Test mode.Walk Test function not
available without AC power.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
5.9 NAC operation
See also “Steady” on page 27, and “NAC Auto-silence and Strobe Programming - Section 2 (‘NAC2’ LED on
steady)” on page 27 for more information.
Class ‘B’ operation selections:
•Steady (default) – On alarm the NAC will turn on steady. It will turn off on either a manual or automatic
signal silence.
•Temporal 3 – On alarm the NAC will turn on with the temporal 3 pattern and turn off on either a manual or
automatic signal silence.
•NAC2 Strobe – On alarm NAC2 will turn on steady. It will not turn off on a manual or automatic signal
silence. NAC2 set in this mode will only turn off on system reset if all zone fire alarms are restored. Only
NAC2 can be set in this mode.
Class ‘A’ operation selections
If the panel NACs are set for class ‘A’ operation then there is only one NAC. In this configuration the NAC
output can only be set for steady or temporal using the NAC1 programming options For class ‘A’, the NAC2
Strobe option is not available.
5.10 Relay Function
Alarm Relay
The panel activates the alarm relay upon any (non-supervisory) zone alarm. The panel deactivates the alarm
relay upon a successful system reset.
Trouble Relay
The panel deactivates the trouble relay upon any system trouble. The panel activates the trouble relay upon
the restoral of all system troubles.
Supervisory Relay (available with the MR-2605-R3 Relay Expander only)
The panel activates the supervisory relay upon any supervisory zone alarm. The panel deactivates the
supervisory relay upon a successful system reset.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
6.0 Programming the FA-265 System
6.1 How to Program the FA-265
You can program the panel using the controls and indicator LEDs. There are no DIP switches to set for
programming.
Once programmed, the operating modes selected are maintained in non-volatile memory that will retain the
programmed information even if all power is removed from the panel.
Entering the Programming mode
Note: All zone alarms must be reset prior to entering the programming mode. While the panel is in
programming mode, the annunciators will show a trouble condition.
1. Remove the lower front cover and locate the ‘Walk Test Switch’ behind the control panel PCB, as shown
below.
Figure 17: Locating the Walk Test Switch
2. Press and hold the Walk Test Switch for two seconds. The common trouble buzzer and common trouble
LED turn on and pulse ½ second on/off.
3. Press any button. The trouble buzzer is silent, and the zone 1 alarm LED turns on steady. The common
trouble LED continues to flash.
4. The panel is now ready to program.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Programming the Panel
The control panel has six different programming sections, which are shown in the table below. The Panel
Status LEDs indicate which programming section you are currently in.
When you first enter programming mode, the panel will be at zone programming (section 0). Each
programming section has one or more programming sub-sections (e.g. section 0 has sub-sections for zones 1
through 5). Use the Silence Trouble and Silence Alarm buttons to enter your programming choices:
1. Each sub-section in a section will have 2 or more programming settings, indicated by the panel Zone
Supervisory and Zone Trouble LEDs. To scroll through the programming settings, press the Silence Alarm
button. Please see “6.2 Programming Section Descriptions” on page 26 for descriptions of each section
and settings, and the LED indications for each setting.
2. When the LEDs show the setting you want for a sub-section, move to the next programming sub-section
by pressing the Silence Trouble button. The panel will save the indicated settings when you exit the
programming mode or go to the next programming section.
3. When you have programmed all the sub-sections in a section, the panel will move to the next programming
section when you press the Silence Trouble button.
Note: Pressing Silence Trouble will advance forward through each programming sub-section, and each
section.
Example: in the Zone 1 programming sub-section, pressing Silence Alarm will scroll through each zone type
setting (null zone, instant zone, auto-verify zone, etc.). When the panel shows the zone type you want for
zone 1, press Silence Trouble to move on to Zone 2 programming.
Exiting the Programming Mode
When you come to the end of all the programming sections, press Silence Trouble to exit the programming
mode.
To exit programming mode at any other point in the panel programming, press and hold the Walk Test switch
for two seconds.
Note: If 5 minutes elapse without any button presses, the panel will automatically exit the programming
mode. During the final 60 seconds before the exit, the panel will sound a warning tone on the
buzzer. Press any button to cancel the auto-exit and resume programming.
After you exit the programming mode, the panel performs a system reset for 10 seconds, during which the
buzzer sounds double beeps. When the beeping stops the panel returns to normal operating mode and all
programming choices are stored in memory.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
6.2 Programming Section Descriptions
Zone Programming (Section 0)
In this zone programming section, the panel uses the zone alarm, supervisory, and trouble LEDs to
indicate the programming as follows:
6.3 Viewing the Event Buffer
Zone type 00 – Null zone (Not used)
The zone is not used. The zone is not supervised, alarms and troubles are
ignored. The end-of-line resistor is not required.
Zone type 01 – Instant alarm for 2-wire smoke detectors and contact devices
Zone type 01 does not differentiate between 2-wire smoke detectors, contact
devices, or 4-wire smoke detectors. When a 2-wire smoke detector, 4 –wire
smoke detector or contact device goes into alarm:
The panel goes into alarm without any delay. If an instant zone goes into
alarm, any auto-verify sequence in progress on another zone will be
immediately cancelled and both zones will indicate an alarm condition.
Zone type 03 – Waterflow zone
This zone type is intended for waterflow alarm initiating contact devices only.
Do not mix other alarm initiating devices on this zone. For Waterflow delay,
use actuating devices with a built-in delay of 30 seconds or more. The overall
maximum waterflow alarm initiation delay allowed is 90 seconds. (NFPA A-56.2 – 1996 edition) When the contact on a Waterflow alarm initialing device is
activated the control panel will go into alarm instantly.
Zone type 04 – Supervisory zone
When the contact on a Supervisory device is initiated:
1. The control panel will immediately indicate the Supervisory “off-normal” condition.
2. The zone supervisory LED (yellow) will flash, the common
‘supervisory’ LED will come on steady and the common trouble
buzzer will sound steadily. Pressing the ‘trouble silence’ switch will
silence the buzzer and the zone supervisory LED will stop flashing
and turn on steadily.
3. Fire supervisory zones are latching and can only be restored when
the initiating device is restored and a system reset is performed.
NAC Temporal/Steady Programming - Section 1 (‘NAC1’ LED on steady)
You can individually program both NAC1 and NAC2 to sound in either a temporal or steady pattern. By
default, both NAC outputs are programmed as steady.
Temporal
The NAC1 will sound the Temporal/ANSI Fire Pattern: 0.5 seconds ON,
0.5 seconds OFF, 0.5 seconds ON, 0.5 seconds OFF, 0.5 seconds ON,
1.5 seconds OFF, repeat.
The NAC2 will sound the Temporal/ANSI Fire Pattern: 0.5 seconds ON,
0.5 seconds OFF, 0.5 seconds ON, 0.5 seconds OFF, 0.5 seconds ON,
1.5 seconds OFF, repeat.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Steady
The NAC1 will sound continuously.
The NAC2 will sound continuously.
NAC Auto-silence and Strobe Programming - Section 2 (‘NAC2’ LED on steady)
Automatic Signal Silence
If Automatic Signal Silence is enabled, 30 minutes after the last fire alarm
on the system, the panel restores the NACs to normal (alarms are
silenced).
If another alarm occurs after the NACs are silenced, the panel will restart
the timer for another 30 minute period.
If Automatic Signal Silence is disabled, the panel will not silence the
NACs automatically.
NAC2 Strobe
If this option is enabled, on alarm, NAC2 turns on steady and does not
turn off on automatic signal silence, or when the Silence Alarm button is
pressed. When NAC2 is set to this mode, it can only be turned off when
all zone fire alarms are restored, and the system is reset. Only NAC2 can
be set to this mode.
If this option is disabled, the panel will restore NAC2 to normal following
an automatic signal silence (see Automatic Signal Silence, above), or
following a press of the ‘Silence Alarm’ button.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Silence Inhibit and Walk Test Programming - Section 3 (‘Battery’ LED on steady)
Signal Silence Inhibit Timer
If the Signal Silence Inhibit Timer is enabled, when the first alarm is
activated, the panel will begin a 60 second countdown. During this 60
seconds, users will not be able to turn off the NACs by pressing the
Silence Alarm button. The timer is started on the first alarm only and is
not restarted on subsequent alarms.
If the Signal Silence Inhibit Timer is disabled, users will be able to turn off
the NACs at any time, by pressing the Silence Alarm button.
If NAC2 is set as a strobe, users will never be able to turn off NAC2 using the
Silence Alarm button. See “Silence Inhibit and Walk Test Programming Section 3 (‘Battery’ LED on steady)” on page 28.
Audible Walk Test
You can set the One Man Walk Test to be either audible or silent. If the
One Man Walk Test is set for audible, then the following will occur:
•On a fire or Supervisory alarm/restoral the bells will pulse ONCE
•On a zone or system trouble/restoral, except ground fault, the bells will
pulse TWICE
•On any ground fault/restoral the bells will pulse THREE times.
If the One Man Walk Test is set for silent, the bells will not sound during
the walk test.
Waterflow Programming - Section 4 (‘Ground Fault’ LED on steady)
Silence Waterflow Alarms
If the Silence Waterflow Alarms option is turned on, Waterflow zones can
be silenced whether the zones are physically restored or not.
If the Silence Waterflow Alarms option is turned off, Waterflow zones
cannot be silenced until they are physically restored. This applies to both
automatic signal silence, and the Silence Alarm button. If there is a
trouble on a Waterflow zone following the alarm and alarm restore, the
zone can be silenced.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
50/60 Hz Option- Section 5 (Signal Silence LED on steady)
Reset Section Programming (All common trouble LEDs flashing)
To Enter this Programming Section
1. Enter the installer programming mode, section 0
2. Press and hold the System Reset button for 2 seconds. The Z1 ALM LED and TRB LED will be ON
and all the System Trouble LEDs will flash.
To Remove Module
Physically remove the module from the system and enter the reset section programming as described
above. Press the ‘Silence Alarm’ button until the Z1 SUPV LED is ON. Press the ‘Silence Trouble’
button to exit this section. Upon exit, the system will reset the ‘supervision’ field for all the modules
currently connected to the ‘secur-bus’.
To Add a Module
Just connect it to the system and it will auto-enroll within one minute.
ALARM
Do not
default (Z2)
(Factory default)
Default to factory
program (Z2)
SUPV
TRB
To Default the System
Enter the reset section programming as described above. Press the
‘Silence Trouble’ button until the Z2 ALM LED is ON and Z2 TRB LED is
ON. Press the ‘Silence Alarm’ button until the Z2 SUPV LED is ON.
Press the ‘Silence Trouble’ to exit this section. Upon exit, the system will
reset all of the panel programmable parameters to their factory default
state. Please note that the ‘supervision’ field will be reset as well.
1. Enter the programming mode by pressing and holding the Walk Test switch for 2 seconds.
2. Press any switch. To silence the trouble buzzer and enter the Section 0 programming.
3. Press and hold the Lamp Test switch for 2 seconds.
4. The Common Supervisory LED flashes to indicate the View Buffer mode.
5. Events are shown from the most recent to the oldest.
6. See the event table below which indicates the LED patterns used to indicate various events.
7. To advance to the next event press the Silence Trouble switch.
8. Once all 20 events have been viewed, the next Silence Trouble keypress will exit the view buffer mode
and return to the Section 0 programming. To exit the programming mode, press and hold for 2 seconds the
Walk Test switch.
9. Pressing the Silence Signal switch at any time will cause the system to exit the View Buffer mode. The
buzzer will sound. Press any button to go to the Section 0 programming mode.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Event Buffer Table
30
Display
Event
Steady Common Alarm LED
Null Event
Flashing Zone X Alarm LED
Verified Zone X Alarm
Steady Zone X Alarm LED
Verified Zone X Alarm Restore
Flashing Zone X Alarm LED and Flashing
Zone X Supervisory LED
Unverified Zone X Alarm
Flashing Zone X Supervisory LED
Zone X Supervisory
Steady Zone X Supervisory LED
Zone X Supervisory Restore
Flashing Zone X Trouble LED
Zone X Trouble
Steady Zone X Trouble LED
Zone X Trouble Restore
Flashing Common Trouble LED
Expansion Module Fault
Steady Common Trouble LED
Expansion Module Fault Restore
Flashing NAC1 Trouble LED
NAC 1 Trouble
Steady NAC1 Trouble LED
NAC 1 Trouble Restore
Flashing NAC2 Trouble LED
NAC 2 Trouble
Steady NAC2 Trouble LED
NAC 2 Trouble Restore
Flashing Battery Trouble LED
Battery Trouble
Steady Battery Trouble LED
Battery Trouble Restore
Flashing Ground Fault LED
Ground Fault Trouble
Steady Ground Fault LED
Ground Fault Restore
Flashing Signal Silenced Trouble LED
Manual Signal Silence
Steady Signal Silenced Trouble LED
(Successful) Reset
Flashing AC On LED
AC Failure
Steady AC On LED
AC Fail Restore
Steady AC On LED and Steady BAT TRB
LED
Cold Start
Flashing AC On LED and Flashing BAT
TRB LED
Warm Start
Flashing (ALL) Zone Trouble LED’s
Walk Test Start / Installer Mode Entry
Steady (ALL) Zone Trouble LED’s
Walk Test End / Installer Mode Exit
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
7.0 Startup of the FA-265
7.1 Prior to power up
•Verify that all field wiring is free of shorts, opens and grounds and that end-of-line devices are connected
and are the proper value.
•Verify that all modules and internal cables are properly seated in their location.
•Verify that all metal components are bonded to the incoming ground. Should measure zero ohms between
any metal part and the incoming ground wire.
•Verify that the polarity between the panel and connected devices is correct.
7.2 Power up sequence
•Connect AC power first before Battery.
•The panel goes into the Reset mode immediately. This lasts for 10 seconds and the trouble buzzer will beep
during the reset period.
•After the reset period ends, the buzzer goes silent, the green AC indicator should be ON and all other LEDs
should be OFF.
•If any LED other than the AC LED is ON then there is a fault in the system. Troubleshoot and repair the fault
before proceeding.
•If the battery is not fully charged, the battery fault LED will come on after about 2 minutes. Verify that the
battery is connected properly and if it is, it may take up to 24 hours to recharge the batteries. Once the
battery is charged, the battery fault LED will go OFF.
7.3 Default Operation
•On first power up, all programmable features will be in the default mode.
•Do a ‘Lamp Test’ to verify that all the indicators function.
•It is suggested that an initial verification of operation be done before the panel is programmed. Verify that
each zone will go into alarm and that each NAC operates the Notification Appliances and that the zone
alarm indicator(s) function. Each zone is defaulted as an instant ‘fire alarm’ and each NAC is defaulted for
‘steady’ output on alarm. An Alarm, Silence, Reset cycle will also verify that the push-button function
properly.
•Verify that each zone indicates a trouble on a zone open and that a ground fault on the extended
conductors is properly indicated.
7.4 Programming the Panel
•Program the panel for the operational features desired. (section 6)
•Record your configuration choices for future reference. (section 8)
•Verify panel operations and feature selections by initiating alarms and troubles as described above.
7.5 Final Verification
•Verify system operation and fault detection as required by the local Authority Having Jurisdiction.
•Enable the ‘one-man’ walk test feature to test all the field devices and wiring.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
8.0 Programming Worksheets
8.1 Entering Programming Mode
Please see “6.0 Programming the FA-265 System” on page 24 for complete instructions.
Note: All zone alarms must be reset prior to entering the programming mode. While the panel is in the
programming mode, the annunciators will show a trouble condition.
To enter the Programming mode:
1. Press and hold the Walk Test button for two seconds (located behind the display PCB).
2. Press any button to turn off the trouble buzzer.
3. Press Silence Alarm to scroll through the settings for each programming section (e.g. to change the zone
type, or to turn an option on or off).
4. Press Silence Trouble to move to the next programming section (e.g. to move from zone 1 to zone 2).
5. The panel will indicate the current programming section using the Common Trouble LEDs, as shown
below:
Please see “6.2 Programming Section Descriptions” on page 26 for detailed descriptions of each
programming section.
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
8.2 Zone Programming (Section 0)
Program each of the zones as one of the following types. (See “Zone Programming (Section 0)” on page 26.)
Record your programming choices in the table below.
ZONE
ALARM
LED On
Zone
No.
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
Type
(00 05)
Label
8.3 NAC Temporal/Steady Programming (Section 1)
Please see “Steady” on page 27.
Settings
ZONE
ALARM
LED On
Programming Section
1
NAC1 Temporal / Steady
Temporal ‰
*Steady ‰
2
NAC2 Temporal / Steady
Temporal ‰
*Steady ‰
* = Factory default
8.4 NAC Auto-silence, Strobe Programming (Section 2)
Please see “NAC Auto-silence and Strobe Programming - Section 2 (‘NAC2’ LED on steady)” on page 27.
Settings
ZONE
ALARM
LED On
Programming Section
1
NAC Auto-silence
Enabled ‰
*Disabled ‰
2
NAC2 Strobe or Bell
Strobe ‰
*Bell ‰
* = Factory default
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FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
8.5 Silence Inhibit and Walk Test Programming (Section 3)
Please see “Silence Inhibit and Walk Test Programming - Section 3 (‘Battery’ LED on steady)” on page 28.
Settings
ZONE
ALARM
LED On
Programming Section
1
Signal Silence Inhibit Timer
Enabled ‰
*Disabled ‰
2
One Man Walk Test
*Audible ‰
Silent ‰
* = Factory default
8.6 Waterflow Programming (Section 4)
Please see “Waterflow Programming - Section 4 (‘Ground Fault’ LED on steady)” on page 28.
Settings
ZONE
ALARM
LED On
1
Programming Section
Silencing of Waterflow Alarms
*Enabled ‰
Disabled ‰
* = Factory default
8.7 50/60Hz Option (Section 5)
ZONE
ALARM LED
On
1
* = Factory default
34
Settings
Programming Section
AC power 50Hz or 60Hz
*60Hz ‰
50Hz ‰
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
9.0 Appendix: Table of Compatible Smoke Detectors
Mode
l
CID
Base
Base
CID
1400/
1400A
A
N/A
N/A
Ionization type
smoke, 2-wire
12/24VDC
System Sensor
1451
A
N/A
Plug-in –
Ionization type
smoke detector
25
System Sensor
2400
A
N/A
N/A
Photoelectric, 2wire, 12/24VDC
25
System Sensor
2400TH
A
N/A
N/A
Photoelectric
with Thermal, 2wire, 12/24VDC
N/A
Photoelectric
with Thermal
and Horn, 2wire, 24VDC
N/A
Photoelectric
with isolated
Thermal and
Horn, 2-wire,
24VDC
N/A
Plug-in –
Photoelectric
type smoke
detector
N/A
Plug-in –
Photoelectric
type smoke
detector with
Thermal
Panel
CID
Max. #
Detectors
Manufacturer
01
25
System Sensor
01
25
01
01
01
01
25
25
System Sensor
System Sensor
Model
2400AT
2400AIT
A
A
B401
B401B
N/A
N/A
B401
01
25
System Sensor
2451
A
B401B
DH400
B401
Description
01
25
System Sensor
2451TH
A
01
25
System Sensor
1100
A
N/A
N/A
Ionization, 2wire, 12/24VDC,
terminal strip
01
25
System Sensor
2100
A
N/A
N/A
Photoelectric, 2wire, 12/24VDC,
terminal strip
B401B
01
25
System Sensor
2100T
A
N/A
N/A
Photoelectric, 2wire, 12/24VDC,
thermistor,
terminal strip
01
25
System Sensor
2112/24T
A
N/A
N/A
Photoelectric,
12/24VDC,
terminal strip
35
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Panel
CID
Max. #
Detectors
Manufacturer
01
25
System Sensor
Model
4451HT
4451HTA
Mode
l
CID
Base
Base
CID
B401
A
B401B
N/A
Plug-in – High
Temp Heat
88°C (190°F)
N/A
Plug-in – Fixed
Temp/Rate of
Rise Detector
N/A
Plug-in – Low
Profile Ion
N/A
Plug-in – Low
Profile Photo
N/A
2-wire direct
wire
Photoelectric
N/A
2-wire direct
wire
Photoelectric
Thermal
N/A
2-wire direct
wire
Photoelectric
Audible
Thermal
N/A
2-wire direct
wire
Photoelectric
Thermal
Auxiliary Relay
DH400
B401
01
25
System Sensor
5451
A
B401B
DH400
01
01
01
01
01
01
36
25
25
25
25
30
30
System Sensor
System Sensor
System Sensor
System Sensor
System Sensor
System Sensor
1151
1151A
2151
2151A
2100S
2100TS
2100AT
2100TR
B401
A
B401B
DH400
B401
A
B401B
DH400
A
A
A
A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Description
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
9.1 Smoke Detector Bases
Max. #
Detectors
Manufacturer
Base
CID
25
System Sensor
B401
N/A
2-wire standard base, 4”, 12/24VDC
25
System Sensor
B401B
N/A
2-wire standard base, 6”, 12/24VDC
25
System Sensor
B406B
N/A
2-wire base, 24VDC, form contact
25
System Sensor
B401BH
N/A
24VDC sounder base for use with B401
25
System Sensor
B110LP
N/A
2-wire, flangeless, 12/24VDC
25
System Sensor
B116LP
N/A
2-wire base, 24VDC, form contact
25
System Sensor
DH400
N/A
Duct Detector Mount
25
System Sensor
RMK400
N/A
Recessed mount kit for Series 400
Model
Description
9.2 Compatible 4-Wire Smoke Detectors
Manufacturer
System
Sensor
Models
1124B
2124B
2124TB
2124S
2124TS
2124R
2124TR
2124AT
2124ATR
2124AITR
1424
2424
2424TH
2424AT
1151*
2151*
-
-
2424AIT
6424
1451**
2451**
22451TH**
-
*Detector with B112LP Base
Detection
Systems
Gentex
Hochiki
DSC
ESL
**Detector with B402B Base
DS284
DS284TH
DS284THS
DS284THR
DS284THSR
DS284THCS
DS284THC
DS284THE
DS284ES
DS284IS
-
-
8240
8240T
8240P
8243P
8240PH
8243PH
8240PT
8243PT
-
-
-
-
SIJ-24
SLR-24
SLR-24H
SLR-835B
-
-
MN240
MN240T
MN240R
MN240RT
MN240S
MN240ST
MN240SR
MN240SRT
-
-
-
-
741U
741UT
-
-
-
-
9.3 Compatible Horns/Strobes
System Sensor
Type
Cd
Voltage
(FWR)
P2415(W)(A)
H/S
15
20-30
P241575(W)(A)
H/S
15/75
20-30
37
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
System Sensor
Type
Voltage
(FWR)
Cd
P2475(W)(A)
H/S
75
20-30
P24110(W)(A)
H/S
110
20-30
S2415(W)(A)
S
15
20-30
S241575(W)(A)
S
15/75
20-30
S2475(W)(A)
S
75
20-30
S24110(W)(A)
S
110
20-30
H24(W)(A)
H
-
20-30
MDL(W)(A)
Synch
Module
20-30
No suffix = Red, suffix W = White, suffix A = Canadian
version
Gentex
Type
Voltage
(FWR)
Cd
GEH24
H
-
20-31
GES24-15
S
15
20-31
GES24-15/75
S
15/75
20-31
GES24-30
S
30
20-31
GES24-60
S
60
20-31
GES24-75
S
75
20-31
GES24-110
S
110
20-31
GEC24-15
H/S
15
20-31
GEC24-15/75
H/S
15/75
20-31
GEC24-30
H/S
30
20-31
GEC24-60
H/S
60
20-31
GEC24-75
H/S
75
20-31
GEC24-110
H/S
110
20-31
Available in Red and White.
Wheelock
38
Type
Cd
Voltage
(FWR)
NS-2415W-FR(W)
H/S
15
20-31
NS-241575W-FR(W)
H/S
15/75
20-31
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Wheelock
Type
Cd
Voltage
(FWR)
NS-2430W-FR(W)
H/S
30
20-31
NS-2475W-FR(W)
H/S
75
20-31
NS-24110W-FR(W)
H/S
110
20-31
NS4-2415W-FR(W)
H/S
15
20-31
NS4-241575W-FR(W)
H/S
15/75
20-31
NS4-2430W-FR(W)
H/S
30
20-31
NS4-2475W-FR(W)
H/S
75
20-31
NS4-24110W-FR(W)
H/S
110
20-31
AS-2415W-FR(W)
S
15
20-31
AS-241575W-FR(W)
S
15/75
20-31
AS-2430W-FR(W)
S
30
20-31
AS-2475W-FR(W)
S
75
20-31
AS-24110W-FR(W)
S
110
20-31
AS4-2415C-FR(W)
S
15
20-31
AS4-2430C-FR(W)
S
30
20-31
AS4-2475C-FR(W)
S
75
20-31
AS4-24110C-FR(W)
S
110
20-31
AH-24-R
H
-
20-31
AH-24-WP-R
H
-
20-31
MT-24-R
H
20-31
MT4-24-R
H
20-31
MT-24-SL-VFR
H/S
15
20-31
MT-24-SLM-VFR
H/S
15/75
20-31
MT-24-MS-VFR
H/S
30
20-31
MT-24-IS-VFR
H/S
75
20-31
MT-24-WM-VFR
H/S
117
20-31
NS = 2-wire, NS4 = 4-wire
39
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
FCC Compliance Statement
CAUTION: Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the manufacturer could void your authority to
use this equipment.
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to
Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful
interference in a residential installation. This equipment generates, uses and can radiate radio frequency
energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to
radio communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular
installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by
one or more of the following measures:
•Re-orient the receiving antenna.
•Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
•Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected.
• Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/television technician for help.
The user may find the following booklet prepared by the FCC useful: “How to Identify and Resolve Radio/
Television Interference Problems”. This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office,
Washington D.C. 20402, Stock # 004-000-00345-4.
40
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Warranty & Warning Information
Warning Please Read Carefully
Note to End Users: This equipment is subject to terms and conditions of sale as follows:
Note to Installers
This warning contains vital information. As the only individual in contact with system users, it is your responsibility
to bring each item in this warning to the attention of the users of this system. Failure to properly inform system endusers of the circumstances in which the system might fail may result in over-reliance upon the system. As a result,
it is imperative that you properly inform each customer for whom you install the system of the possible forms of
failure.
System Failures
This system has been carefully designed to be as effective as possible. There are circumstances, such as fire or
other types of emergencies where it may not provide protection. Alarm systems of any type may be compromised
deliberately or may fail to operate as expected for a variety of reasons. Some reasons for system failure include:
•Inadequate Installation
A Fire Alarm system must be installed in accordance with all the applicable codes and standards in order to provide
adequate protection. An inspection and approval of the initial installation, or, after any changes to the system, must
be conducted by the Local Authority Having Jurisdiction. Such inspections ensure installation has been carried out
properly.
•Power Failure
Control units, smoke detectors and many other connected devices require an adequate power supply for proper
operation. If the system or any device connected to the system operates from batteries, it is possible for the
batteries to fail. Even if the batteries have not failed, they must be fully charged, in good condition and installed
correctly. If a device operates only by AC power, any interruption, however brief, will render that device inoperative
while it does not have power. Power interruptions of any length are often accompanied by voltage fluctuations
which may damage electronic equipment such as a fire alarm system. After a power interruption has occurred,
immediately conduct a complete system test to ensure that the system operates as intended.
•Failure of Replaceable Batteries
Systems with wireless transmitters have been designed to provide several years of battery life under normal
conditions. The expected battery life is a function of the device environment, usage and type. Ambient conditions
such as high humidity, high or low temperatures, or large temperature fluctuations may reduce the expected
battery life. While each transmitting device has a low battery monitor which identifies when the batteries need to be
replaced, this monitor may fail to operate as expected. Regular testing and maintenance will keep the system in
good operating condition.
•Compromise of Radio Frequency (Wireless) Devices
Signals may not reach the receiver under all circumstances which could include metal objects placed on or near
the radio path or deliberate jamming or other inadvertent radio signal interference.
•System Users
A user may not be able to operate a panic or emergency switch possibly due to permanent or temporary physical
disability, inability to reach the device in time, or unfamiliarity with the correct operation. It is important that all
system users be trained in the correct operation of the alarm system and that they know how to respond when the
system indicates an alarm.
•Automatic Alarm Initiating Devices
Smoke detectors, heat detectors and other alarm initiating devices that are a part of this system may not properly
detect a fire condition or signal the control panel to alert occupants of a fire condition for a number of reasons, such
as: the smoke detectors or heat detector may have been improperly installed or positioned; smoke or heat may not
41
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
be able to reach the alarm initiating device, such as when the fire is in a chimney, walls or roofs, or on the other
side of closed doors; and, smoke and heat detectors may not detect smoke or heat from fires on another level of
the residence or building.
•Software
Most Mircom products contain software. With respect to those products, Mircom does not warranty that the
operation of the software will be uninterrupted or error-free or that the software will meet any other standard of
performance, or that the functions or performance of the software will meet the user’s requirements. Mircom shall
not be liable for any delays, breakdowns, interruptions, loss, destruction, alteration or other problems in the use of
a product arising our of, or caused by, the software.
Every fire is different in the amount and rate at which smoke and heat are generated. Smoke detectors cannot
sense all types of fires equally well. Smoke detectors may not provide timely warning of fires caused by
carelessness or safety hazards such as smoking in bed, violent explosions, escaping gas, improper storage of
flammable materials, overloaded electrical circuits, children playing with matches or arson.
Even if the smoke detector or heat detector operates as intended, there may be circumstances when there is
insufficient warning to allow all occupants to escape in time to avoid injury or death.
•Alarm Notification Appliances
Alarm Notification Appliances such as sirens, bells, horns, or strobes may not warn people or waken someone
sleeping if there is an intervening wall or door. If notification appliances are located on a different level of the
residence or premise, then it is less likely that the occupants will be alerted or awakened. Audible notification
appliances may be interfered with by other noise sources such as stereos, radios, televisions, air conditioners or
other appliances, or passing traffic. Audible notification appliances, however loud, may not be heard by a hearingimpaired person.
•Telephone Lines
If telephone lines are used to transmit alarms, they may be out of service or busy for certain periods of time. Also
the telephone lines may be compromised by such things as criminal tampering, local construction, storms or
earthquakes.
•Insufficient Time
There may be circumstances when the system will operate as intended, yet the occupants will not be protected
from the emergency due to their inability to respond to the warnings in a timely manner. If the system is monitored,
the response may not occur in time enough to protect the occupants or their belongings.
•Component Failure
Although every effort has been made to make this system as reliable as possible, the system may fail to function as
intended due to the failure of a component.
•Inadequate Testing
Most problems that would prevent an alarm system from operating as intended can be discovered by regular
testing and maintenance. The complete system should be tested as required by national standards and the Local
Authority Having Jurisdiction and immediately after a fire, storm, earthquake, accident, or any kind of construction
activity inside or outside the premises. The testing should include all sensing devices, keypads, consoles, alarm
indicating devices and any other operational devices that are part of the system.
•Security and Insurance
Regardless of its capabilities, an alarm system is not a substitute for property or life insurance. An alarm system
also is not a substitute for property owners, renters, or other occupants to act prudently to prevent or minimize the
harmful effects of an emergency situation.
IMPORTANT NOTE: End-users of the system must take care to ensure that the system, batteries, telephone lines,
etc. are tested and examined on a regular basis to ensure the minimization of system failure.
42
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Limited Warranty
Mircom Technologies Ltd. warrants the original purchaser that for a period of two years from the date of
manufacture, the product shall be free of defects in materials and workmanship under normal use. During the
warranty period, Mircom Technologies Ltd. shall, at its option, repair or replace any defective product upon
return of the product to its factory, at no charge for labor and materials. Any replacement and/or repaired parts
are warranted for the remainder of the original warranty or ninety (90) days, whichever is longer. The original
owner must promptly notify Mircom Technologies Ltd. in writing that there is defect in material or
workmanship, such written notice to be received in all events prior to expiration of the warranty period.
International Warranty
The warranty for international customers is the same as for any customer within Canada and the United
States, with the exception that Mircom Technologies Ltd. shall not be responsible for any customs fees, taxes,
or VAT that may be due.
Conditions to Void Warranty
This warranty applies only to defects in parts and workmanship relating to normal use. It does not cover:
•damage incurred in shipping or handling;
•damage caused by disaster such as fire, flood, wind, earthquake or lightning;
•damage due to causes beyond the control of Mircom Technologies Ltd. such as excessive voltage,
mechanical shock or
•water damage;
•damage caused by unauthorized attachment, alterations, modifications or foreign objects;
•damage caused by peripherals (unless such peripherals were supplied by Mircom Technologies Ltd.);
•defects caused by failure to provide a suitable installation environment for the products;
•damage caused by use of the products for purposes other than those for which it was designed;
•damage from improper maintenance;
•damage arising out of any other abuse, mishandling or improper application of the products.
Warranty Procedure
To obtain service under this warranty, please return the item(s) in question to the point of purchase. All
authorized distributors and dealers have a warranty program. Anyone returning goods to Mircom
Technologies Ltd. must first obtain an authorization number. Mircom Technologies Ltd. will not accept any
shipment whatsoever for which prior authorization has not been obtained. NOTE: Unless specific preauthorization in writing is obtained from Summit management, no credits will be issued for custom fabricated
products or parts or for complete fire alarm system. Summit will at its sole option, repair or replace parts under
warranty. Advance replacements for such items must be purchased.
Note: Mircom Technologies Ltd.’s liability for failure to repair the product under this warranty after a
reasonable number of attempts will be limited to a replacement of the product, as the exclusive remedy for
breach of warranty.
Disclaimer of Warranties
This warranty contains the entire warranty and shall be in lieu of any and all other warranties, whether
expressed or implied (including all implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose)
And of all other obligations or liabilities on the part of Mircom Technologies Ltd. neither assumes nor
authorizes any other person purporting to act on its behalf to modify or to change this warranty, nor to assume
for it any other warranty or liability concerning this product. This disclaimer of warranties and limited warranty
are governed by the laws of the province of Ontario, Canada.
43
FA-265 Installation and Operator’s Manual
Out of Warranty Repairs
Mircom Technologies Ltd. will at its option repair or replace out-of-warranty products which are returned to its
factory according to the following conditions. Anyone returning goods to Mircom Technologies Ltd. must first
obtain an authorization number. Mircom Technologies Ltd. will not accept any shipment whatsoever for which
prior authorization has not been obtained.
Products which Mircom Technologies Ltd. determines to be repairable will be repaired and returned. A set fee
which Mircom Technologies Ltd. has predetermined and which may be revised from time to time, will be
charged for each unit repaired.
Products which Mircom Technologies Ltd. determines not to be repairable will be replaced by the nearest
equivalent product available at that time. The current market price of the replacement product will be charged
for each replacement unit.
WARNING: Mircom Technologies Ltd. recommends that the entire system be completely tested on a regular
basis. However, despite frequent testing, and due to, but not limited to, criminal tampering or electrical
disruption, it is possible for this product to fail to perform as expected.
NOTE: Under no circumstances shall Mircom Technologies Ltd. be liable for any special, incidental, or
consequential damages based upon breach of warranty, breach of contract, negligence, strict liability, or any
other legal theory. Such damages include, but are not limited to, loss of profits, loss of the product or any
associated equipment, cost of capital, cost of substitute or replacement equipment, facilities or services,
down time, purchaser’s time, the claims of third parties, including customers, and injury to property.
MIRCOM MAKES NO WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE WITH RESPECT TO ITS GOODS DELIVERED, NOR IS THERE ANY OTHER WARRANTY,
EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, EXCEPT FOR THE WARRANTY CONTAINED HEREIN.
44
Advanced Life Safety Solutions
Canada
25 Interchange Way
Vaughan, ON L4K 5W3
Tel: 905-660-4655 Fax: 905-660-4113
U.S.A.
60 Industrial Parkway PMB 278
Cheektowaga, NY 14227
Tel: 1-888-660-4655 Fax: 1-888-660-4113
© Mircom 2007
Printed in Canada
Subject to change without prior notice
www.mircom.com