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US008463238B2
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent No.:
Forstall et al.
(54)
(45) Date of Patent:
MOBILE DEVICE BASE STATION
5,031,104 A
5,067,081 A
(75) Inventors: Scott Forstall, Mountain View, CA
531953031 A
CA (US); Robert E. Borchers,
Pleasanton, CA (U S); Kevin Tiene,
cupemno CA (Us)
5,243,652 A
5,337,044 A
5,371,678 A
’
.
.
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@ggggma et al
3/1993 Ordish
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12/1994 Nomura
5,379,057 A
1/1995 Clough et a1.
5,406,490 A
4/1995
5,416,890 A
5,469,362 A
Notice:
Filed,
11/1995 Hunt et a1.
Subject to any disclaimer, the term of this
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
5,519,760 A
5,523,950 A
5/1996 Borkowski et a1,
6/1996 Peterson
U.S.C. 154(b) by 1261 days.
5,537,460 A
7/1996 Holliday, Jr. et a1.
5,539,395 A
7/1996 Buss
(Continued)
Jan 2 2008
.
.
(65)
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
,
Prior Publication Data
Us 2009/0005005 A1
BR
9904979
12/2000
CA
2163215
5/1994
Jan. 1, 2009
(Commued)
Related US. Application Data
(60)
Provisional application No. 60/946,788, ?led on Jun.
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
U'S' Appl' NO' ll/464’67l’ ?led Aug' 15’ 2006’ Johnson
28, 2007.
(51) glgllgll'l/mi
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U S Cl
B
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(21) Appl. No.: 11/968,609
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Jun. 11, 2013
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2
(US); Gregory N. Christie, San Jose,
(73) Ass1gnee: Apple Inc., Cupertmo, CA (US)
(*)
US 8,463,238 B2
(Continued)
(2006 01)
'
Primary Examiner * Sharad Rampuria
(74) Attorney, Agent, or Firm * GaZdZinski & Associates,
USPC ..... .. 455/411; 455/426.1; 455/557; 455/41.2;
PC
455/418; 455/456.4; 370/338
(58)
Field of Classi?cation Search
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ABSTRACT
A mobile device can be con?gured as a base station to be used
by other mobile devices and non-mobile devices to gain
access to network services. The mobile device can be con?g
ured to provide and manage secure access to variety of net
works (e.g., Wi-Fi, WiMaX, Internet, cellular) and network
services (e.g., map services, web services, syncing services).
19 Claims, 5 Drawing Sheets
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* cited by examiner
US. Patent
Jun. 11,2013
Sheet 1 of5
US 8,463,238 B2
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Jun. 11,2013
Operating System Instructions
Sheet 3 of5
US 8,463,238 B2
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Phone Instructions
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Web Browsing Instructions
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US. Patent
Jun. 11,2013
Sheet 4 of5
FIG. 4
US 8,463,238 B2
US. Patent
Jun. 11, 2013
Sheet 5 015
US 8,463,238 B2
500 1
Enter Mobile Device Setup Screen
l
l
Configure Mobile Device to Operate as
Base Station
@
Receive Wireless Network Access Requests
from Requesting Device(s)
506
Provide Network Access to
Requesting Device(s)
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2
US 8,463,238 B2
1
2
MOBILE DEVICE BASE STATION
FIG. 3 is a block diagram of an example implementation of
the mobile device of FIG. 1.
FIG. 4 illustrates an example of using the mobile device of
RELATED APPLICATION
FIG. 1 as a Wireless base station.
This application claims priority to US. Provisional Patent
Application Ser. No. 60/946,788 ?led Jun. 28, 2007, entitled
FIG. 5 illustrates an example process for providing Wire
less base station functionality from a mobile device.
“Mobile Device Base Station,” the contents of Which are
incorporated herein by reference.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
TECHNICAL FIELD
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an example mobile device 100.
The mobile device 100 can, for example, be implemented in
a handheld computer, a personal digital assistant, a cellular
The subject matter of this patent application is generally
related to mobile devices.
telephone, a netWork appliance, a camera, a smart phone, an
BACKGROUND
enhanced general packet radio service (EGPRS) mobile
phone, a netWork base station, or other electronic device, or a
combination of any tWo or more of these data processing
Mobile devices equipped With Wireless transceivers can
connect to a netWork When in proximity of an access point to
the netWork, commonly referred to as a base station. The area
devices or other data processing devices.
surrounding a base station Where the signal strength is su?i
cient for access is commonly referred to as a “hotspot.”
Hotspots can range from a single room to many square miles
20
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 includes
a touch-sensitive display 102. The touch-sensitive display
of overlapping hotspots. Connectivity to a netWork through a
hotspot can intermittently fail or drop When traveling betWeen
hotspots. In some locations there may be no hotspots avail
able. In such locations, the only access to the Internet may be
through a cellular phone netWork.
25
To enable subscribers to access the Internet, some carriers
In some implementations, touch-sensitive display 102 can
comprise a multi-touch-sensitive display 102. A multi-touch
30
sensitive display 102 can, for example, process multiple
simultaneous touch points, including processing data related
to the pressure, degree and/or position of each touch point.
Such processing facilitates gestures and interactions With
multiple ?ngers, chording, and other interactions. Other
35
touch-sensitive display technologies can also be used, e.g., a
display in Which contact is made using a stylus or other
netWork connectivity to the mobile device hosting the card.
Other users in the same location Who have mobile devices that
can only access, for example, a Wi-Fi netWork, Will be denied
access to the cellular netWork. Moreover, the card Will use up
a slot in the mobile device I/ O that the user might rather keep
free for another device (e.g., a memory module). Finally,
having a separate card means another piece of equipment that
can get lost, damaged or stolen.
SUMMARY
40
A mobile device can be con?gured as a base station to be
pointing device. Some examples of multi-touch-sensitive dis
play technology are described in US. Pat. Nos. 6,323,846;
6,570,577; 6,677,932; and US. Patent Publication 2002/
00l5024Al, each of Which is incorporated by reference
herein in its entirety.
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 includes
used by other mobile devices and non-mobile devices to gain
access to netWork services. The mobile device can be con?g
ured to provide and manage secure access to variety of net
102 can implement a liquid crystal display (LCD) technology,
a light emitting polymer display (LPD) technology, or some
other display technology. The touch-sensitive display 102 can
be sensitive to haptic and/or tactile contact With a user.
provide their subscribers With a portable Wireless transceiver
card (e.g., a PCI card) that plugs-in to a notebook computer
and provides access to hotspots (e.g., Wi-Fi, WiMax) and
cellular phone netWorks. Such a card, hoWever, only provides
Mobile Device OvervieW
one or more graphical user interfaces displayed on the touch
45
sensitive display 102 for providing the user access to the
various system objects and for conveying information to the
Works (e.g., Wi-Fi, WiMax, Internet, cellular) and netWork
services (e.g., map services, Web services, syncing services).
user. In some implementations, the graphical user interface
can include one or more display objects 104, 106. In the
In some implementations, a mobile device includes a pro
by the processor, causes the processor to con?gure the mobile
example shoWn, the display objects 104, 106, are graphic
representations of system objects. Some examples of system
objects include device functions, applications, WindoWs,
device to be an access point for a Wireless netWork. A com
?les, alerts, events, or other identi?able system objects.
cessor and a storage device coupled to the processor. The
storage device includes instructions, Which, When executed
munication interface is coupled to the processor and operable
for receiving an access request from a requesting device, and
for coupling the requesting device to the Wireless netWork in
50
Example Mobile Device Functionality
55
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 can
response to the access request.
implement multiple device functionalities, such as a tele
phony device, as indicated by a phone object 110; an e-mail
device, as indicated by the e-mail object 112; a netWork data
communication device, as indicated by the Web object 114; a
Wi-Fi base station device (not shoWn); and a media process
In some implementations, a method includes: con?guring
a mobile device to be an access point for a Wireless network;
receiving an access request from a requesting device; and
coupling the requesting device to the Wireless netWork in
response to the access request.
DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of an example mobile device.
FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an example netWork operating
environment for the mobile device of FIG. 1.
65
ing device, as indicated by the media player object 116. In
some implementations, particular display objects 104, e.g.,
the phone object 110, the e-mail object 112, the Web object
114, and the media player object 116, can be displayed in a
function menu bar 118. In some implementations, each of the
device functionalities can be accessed from a top-level
US 8,463,238 B2
3
4
graphical user interface, such as the graphical user interface
can be included to facilitate voice-enabled functionalities,
such as phone and voice mail functions. In some implemen
tations, a loud speaker 164 canbe included to facilitate hands
illustrated in FIG. 1. Touching the touch- sensitive display 1 02
on one of the objects 110, 112, 114 or 116 can, for example,
invoke the corresponding functionality.
free voice functionalities, such as speaker phone functions.
An audio jack 166 can also be included for use of headphones
and/or a microphone.
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 can
implement netWork distribution functionality. For example,
the functionality can enable the user to take the mobile device
In some implementations, a proximity sensor 168 can be
100 and its associated netWork While traveling. In particular,
included to facilitate the detection of the user positioning the
mobile device 100 proximate to the user’s ear and, in
response, to disengage the touch-sensitive display 102 to
prevent accidental function invocations. In some implemen
tations, the touch-sensitive display 102 can be turned off to
conserve additional poWer When the mobile device 100 is
proximate to the user’s ear.
the mobile device 100 can extend Internet access (e.g., via
Wi-Fi) to other Wireless devices in the vicinity. For example,
mobile device 100 can be con?gured as a base station for one
or more devices.As such, mobile device 100 can grant or deny
netWork access to other Wireless devices. Other networking
schemes and con?gurations are possible. Exemplary net
Working schemes and con?gurations are discussed in FIGS. 4
and 5 beloW.
In some implementations, upon invocation of particular
device functionality, the graphical user interface of the
mobile device 100 changes, or is augmented or replaced With
Other sensors can also be used. For example, in some
implementations, an ambient light sensor 170 can be utiliZed
to facilitate adjusting the brightness of the touch-sensitive
display 102. In some implementations, an accelerometer 172
can be utiliZed to detect movement of the mobile device 100,
as indicated by the directional arroW 174. Accordingly, dis
another user interface or user interface elements, to facilitate 20
user access to particular functions associated With the corre
play objects and/or media can be presented according to a
sponding device functionality. For example, in response to a
user touching the phone object 110, the graphical user inter
face of the touch-sensitive display 102 may present display
detected orientation, e.g., portrait or landscape. In some
implementations, the mobile device 100 may include cir
cuitry and sensors for supporting a location determining
to present display objects related to various e-mail functions;
capability, such as that provided by the global positioning
system (GPS) or other positioning systems (e.g., systems
using Wi-Fi access points, television signals, cellular grids,
touching the Web object 114 may cause the graphical user
interface to present display objects related to various Web
Uniform Resource Locators (URLs)). In some implementa
tions, a positioning system (e.g., a GPS receiver) can be
objects related to various phone functions; likewise, touching
25
of the email object 112 may cause the graphical user interface
sur?ng functions; and touching the media player object 116
30
may cause the graphical user interface to present display
objects related to various media processing functions.
through an interface (e.g., port device 190) to provide access
In some implementations, the top-level graphical user
interface environment or state of FIG. 1 can be restored by
pressing a button 120 located near the bottom of the mobile
35
to location-based services.
The mobile device 100 can also include a camera lens and
sensor 180. In some implementations, the camera lens and
sensor 180 can be located on the back surface of the mobile
device 100. The camera can capture still images and/or video.
40
less communication subsystems, such as a 802.1lb/g com
munication device 186, and/or a BluetoothTM communication
device 188. Other communication protocols can also be sup
device 100. In some implementations, each corresponding
device functionality may have a corresponding “home” dis
play objects displayed on the touch-sensitive display 102, and
The mobile device 100 can also include one or more Wire
the graphical user interface environment of FIG. 1 can be
restored by pressing the “home” display object.
In some implementations, the top-level graphical user
interface can include additional display objects 106, such as a
ported, including other 802 .x communication protocols (e. g.,
WiMax, Wi-Fi, 3G), code division multiple access (CDMA),
global system for mobile communications (GSM), Enhanced
short messaging service (SMS) object 130, a calendar object
132, a photos object 134, a camera object 136, a calculator
object 138, a stocks object 140, a Weather object 142, a maps
object 144, a notes object 146, a clock object 148, an address
integrated into the mobile device 100 or provided as a sepa
rate device that can be coupled to the mobile device 100
45
Data GSM Environment (EDGE), etc.
146, 148, 150 and 152 can invoke a corresponding object
In some implementations, a port device 190, e.g., a Uni
versal Serial Bus (U SB) port, or a docking port, or some other
Wired port connection, can be included. The port device 190
can, for example, be utiliZed to establish a Wired connection
to other computing devices, such as other communication
devices 100, a personal computer, a printer, or other process
environment and functionality. The top-level graphical user
ing devices capable of receiving and/ or transmitting data. In
book object 150, and a settings object 152. Touching the SMS
display object 130 can, for example, invoke an SMS messag
ing environment and supporting functionality; likeWise, each
selection of a display object 134, 136, 138, 140, 142, 144,
interface environment of FIG. 1 can be restored by pressing
the button 120.
Additional and/ or different display objects can also be
displayed in the graphical user interface of FIG. 1. For
example, if the device 100 is functioning as a base station for
50
some implementations, the port device 190 alloWs the mobile
device 100 to synchroniZe With a host device using one or
55
tions, a TCP/IP over USB protocol can be used, as described
in co-pending U.S. Provisional Patent Application No.
60/945,904, for “Multiplexed Data Stream Protocol,” ?led
other devices, one or more “connection” icons may appear in
the graphical user interface to indicate the connection. In
some implementations, the display objects 106 can be con
?gured by a user, e.g., a user may specify Which display
objects 106 are displayed, and/or may doWnload additional
applications or other softWare that provides other functional
ities and corresponding display objects.
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 can
include one or more input/ output (I/ O) devices and/or sensor
devices. For example, a speaker 160 and a microphone 162
more protocols, such as, for example, the TCP/IP, HTTP,
UDP and any other knoWn protocol. In some implementa
60
Jun. 22, 2007, Which patent application is incorporated by
reference herein in its entirety.
FIG. 2 is a block diagram of an example netWork operating
environment 200 for the mobile device 100 of FIG. 1. The
mobile device 100 of FIG. 1 can, for example, communicate
65 over one or more Wired and/ or Wireless netWorks 210 in data
communication. For example, a Wireless netWork 212, e.g., a
cellular netWork, can communicate With a Wide area netWork
US 8,463,238 B2
5
6
(WAN) 214, such as the Internet, by use of a gateway 216.
Likewise, an access point 218, such as an 802.1 lg wireless
100, e. g., by invocation of a web browsing function or appli
cation (e.g., a browser) in response to a user touching the Web
access point, can provide communication access to the wide
area network 214. In some implementations, both voice and
data communications can be established over the wireless
object 114.
Example Device Architecture
network 212 and the access point 218. For example, the
mobile device 100a can place and receive phone calls (e.g.,
FIG. 3 is a block diagram 300 of an example implementa
tion of the mobile device 100 of FIG. 1. The mobile device
using VoIP protocols), send and receive e-mail messages
(e.g., using POP3 protocol), and retrieve electronic docu
100 can include a memory interface 302 one or more data
processors, image processors and/ or central processing units
304, and a peripherals interface 306. The memory interface
ments and/or streams, such as web pages, photographs, and
videos, over the wireless network 212, gateway 216, and wide
area network 214 (e. g., TCP/IP or UDP protocols). Likewise,
the mobile device 1001) can place and receive phone calls,
send and receive e-mail messages, and retrieve electronic
302, the one or more processors 304 and/or the peripherals
documents over the access point 218 and the wide area net
interface 306 canbe separate components or can be integrated
in one or more integrated circuits. The various components in
the mobile device 100 can be coupled by one or more com
work 214. In some implementations, the mobile device 100
can be physically connected to the access point 218 using one
munication buses or signal lines.
Sensors, devices and subsystems can be coupled to the
or more cables and the access point 218 can be a personal
peripherals interface 306 to facilitate multiple functionalities.
computer. In this con?guration, the mobile device 100 can be
20
For example, a motion sensor 310, a light sensor 312, and a
referred to as a “tethered” device.
proximity sensor 314 can be coupled to the peripherals inter
In some implementations, the mobile devices 100a and
1001) can also establish communications by other means. For
example, the wireless device 100a can communicate with
functions described with respect to FIG. 1. Other sensors 316
can also be connected to the peripherals interface 306, such as
other wireless devices, e.g., other wireless devices 100, cell
phones, etc., over the wireless network 212. Likewise, the
face 306 to facilitate the orientation, lighting and proximity
25
sensor, a biometric sensor, or other sensing device, to facili
tate related functionalities.
A camera subsystem 320 and an optical sensor 322, e.g., a
mobile devices 100a and 1001) can establish peer-to-peer
communications 220, e. g., a personal area network, by use of
one or more communication subsystems, such as the Blue
toothTM communication device 188 shown in FIG. 1. Other
a positioning system (e.g., a GPS receiver), a temperature
30
charged coupled device (CCD) or a complementary metal
oxide semiconductor (CMOS) optical sensor, can be utiliZed
to facilitate camera functions, such as recording photographs
communication protocols and topologies can also be imple
and video clips.
mented.
The mobile device 100 can, for example, communicate
Communication functions can be facilitated through a
communication interface including one or more wireless
with one or more services 230, 240, 250 and 260 and/or one 35 communication subsystems 324, which can include radio
or more content publishers 270 over the one or more wired
frequency receivers and transmitters and/or optical (e. g.,
infrared) receivers and transmitters. The speci?c design and
and/or wireless networks 210. For example, a navigation
service 230 can provide navigation information, e.g., map
shown, a user of the mobile device 1001) has invoked a map
implementation of the communication subsystem 324 can
depend on the communication network(s) over which the
mobile device 100 is intended to operate. For example, a
mobile device 100 may include communication subsystems
functionality, e.g., by touching the maps object 144 on the
top-level graphical user interface shown in FIG. 1, and has
324 designed to operate over a GSM network, a GPRS net
work, an EDGE network, a Wi-Fi or WiMax network, and a
information, location information, route information, and
other information, to the mobile device 100. In the example
40
BluetoothTM network. In particular, the wireless communica
requested and received a map for the location “1 In?nite
Loop, Cupertino, Calif.”
45
A messaging service 240 can, for example, provide e-mail
and/ or other messaging services. A media service 250 can, for
example, provide access to media ?les, such as song ?les,
movie ?les, video clips, and other media data. One or more
other services 260 can also be utiliZed by the mobile device
tion subsystems 324 may include hosting protocols such that
the device 100 may be con?gured as a base station for other
wireless devices.
An audio subsystem 326 can be coupled to a speaker 328
and a microphone 330 to facilitate voice-enabled functions,
100. For example, a syncing service can, for example, per
such as voice recognition, voice replication, digital recording,
and telephony functions.
form syncing services (e.g., sync ?les). An activation service
can, for example, perform an activation process for activating
ler 342 and/ or other input controller(s) 344. The touch-screen
the mobile device 100, as described in Us. patent application
Ser. No. 11/767,447, for “Device Activation and Access”,
50
The I/ O subsystem 340 can include a touch screen control
55
controller 342 can be coupled to a touch screen 346. The
touch screen 346 and touch screen controller 342 can, for
?led Jun. 22, 2007, which patent application is incorporated
example, detect contact and movement or break thereof using
by reference herein in its entirety. Other services can also be
provided, including a software update service that automati
any of a plurality of touch sensitivity technologies, including
but not limited to capacitive, resistive, infrared, and surface
cally determines whether software updates exist for software
on the mobile device 100, downloads the software updates to
the mobile device 100 where the updates can be manually or
60
automatically unpacked and/or installed.
The other input controller(s) 344 can be coupled to other
The mobile device 100 can also access other data and
input/control devices 348, such as one or more buttons, rocker
switches, thumb-wheel, infrared port, USB port, and/ or a
content over the one or more wired and/or wireless networks
210. For example, content publishers 270, such as news sites,
acoustic wave technologies, as well as other proximity sensor
arrays or other elements for determining one or more points of
contact with the touch screen 346.
65
pointer device such as a stylus. The one or more buttons (not
RSS feeds, web sites, blogs, social networking sites, devel
shown) can include an up/down button for volume control of
oper networks, etc., can be accessed by the mobile device
the speaker 328 and/or the microphone 330.
US 8,463,238 B2
7
8
In one implementation, a pressing of the button for a ?rst
duration may disengage a lock of the touch screen 346; and a
mentations, the mobile device 100 can provide a stand-alone
unit deployed as an access point for Internet connectivity. In
particular, the connectivity can also be used for services such
pressing of the button for a second duration that is longer than
the ?rst duration may turn poWer to the mobile device 100 on
or off. The user may be able to customiZe a functionality of
as VoIP phone access, gaming, and basic connectivity of
consumer electronics such as televisions, DVD players, and
digital cameras.
one or more of the buttons. The touch screen 346 can, for
example, also be used to implement virtual or soft buttons
In operation, the mobile device 100 may bridge Wireless
and/ or a keyboard.
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 can
devices to the netWork 401. In particular, the bridge connec
tion may provide Wi-Fi (e.g., Internet) access from the net
Work 401 to the Wireless devices. For example, the mobile
present recorded audio and/or video ?les, such as MP3,AAC,
and MPEG ?les. In some implementations, the mobile device
device 100 can be con?gured to distribute Wireless access to
one or more Wireless devices, including, but not limited to, a
100 can include the functionality of an MP3 player, such as an
iPodTM. The mobile device 100 may, therefore, include a
laptop device 402, a tablet computer 404, a cellular phone
406, a PDA 408, a smart phone 410, an enhanced general
36-pin connector that is compatible With the iPod. Other
input/output and control devices can also be used.
The memory interface 302 can be coupled to memory 350.
packet radio service (EGPRS) mobile phone 412, or other
Wireless capable devices.
The memory 350 can include high-speed random access
The netWork 401 may be the Internet, VoIP netWork, or any
memory and/or non-volatile memory, such as one or more
other communication system or systems at one or more loca
magnetic disk storage devices, one or more optical storage
devices, and/ or ?ash memory (e.g., NAND, NOR). The
20
DarWin, RTXC, LINUX, UNIX, OS X, WINDOWS, or an
embedded operating system such as VxWorks. The operating
system 352 may include instructions for handling basic sys
tem services and for performing hardWare dependent tasks. In
tions capable of permitting a Wireless link. Such an example
Wireless link may be via 802.11a, 802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n,
802.20, Bluetooth®, WiMAX®, and many others. While
memory 350 can store an operating system 352, such as
25
some implementations, the operating system 352 can be a
kernel (e.g., a UNIX kernel).
The memory 350 may also store communication instruc
tions 354 to facilitate communicating With one or more addi
illustrated as a single or continuous netWork, netWork 401
may be logically divided into various sub-nets or virtual net
Works Without departing from the scope of this disclosure, so
long as at least portion of netWork 401 may facilitate com
munications betWeen mobile device 100 and at least one
Wireless device 402-412. In some implementations, the net
Work 401 may include Wireless local area netWorks (WLAN),
tional devices, one or more computers and/or one or more 30 Bluetooth® netWorks, one or more radio access netWorks
servers. The memory 350 may include graphical user inter
(RANs), metropolitan area netWorks (MANs), Wide area net
face instructions 356 to facilitate graphic user interface pro
cessing; sensor processing instructions 358 to facilitate sen
Works (WANs), mobile ad-hoc networks (MANets), mobile
phone netWork (e.g., a mobile phone netWork using any com
bination of GSM, CDMA, GPRS, EDGE, EV-DO, WCDMA,
sor-related processing and functions; phone instructions 360
to facilitate phone-related processes and functions; electronic
messaging instructions 362 to facilitate electronic-messaging
related processes and functions; Web broWsing instructions
364 to facilitate Web broWsing-related processes and func
tions; media processing instructions 366 to facilitate media
35
processing-related processes and functions; GPS/Navigation
40
UMTS, and HSDPA technologies), or other proprietary Wire
less protocols.
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 can be
con?gured as an Airport or Airport Extreme type of netWork
(available from Apple, Inc. of Cupertino, Calif.). In this
example, mobile device 100 may utiliZe one or more Airport
instructions 368 to facilitate GPS and navigation-related pro
technology systems to provide Wi-Fi access to other Wireless
cesses and instructions; camera instructions 370 to facilitate
devices (e.g., using protocols such as 802.11b, 802.11g, and
802.11n, etc.). In some implementations, the Airport net
Working system may provide Wireless security, such as Wired
equivalent privacy (WEP) With encryption, to the mobile
camera-related processes and functions; and/or other soft
Ware instructions 372 to facilitate other related processes and
functions.
Each of the above identi?ed instructions and applications
45
device 100 and other connected Wireless devices. Advanta
geously, the devices connected by mobile device 100 (con
?gured With Airport or Airport Extreme netWorking) can
can correspond to a set of instructions for performing one or
more functions described above. These instructions need not
be implemented as separate softWare programs, procedures or
modules. The memory 350 can include additional instruc
tions or feWer instructions. Furthermore, various functions of
50
share an Internet connection, exchange ?les, access local and
remote ?le servers, interact With other users in multiplayer
games, or share a printer, to name a feW examples.
the mobile device 100 may be implemented in hardWare
and/ or in softWare, including in one or more signal processing
and/ or application speci?c integrated circuits.
55
Mobile Device Operating as a Wireless Base Station
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 may pro
vide an ad hoc netWork, Where Wireless devices manage
themselves Without access points. For example, the mobile
device 100 can be con?gured to employ a mobile ad hoc
netWork (MANet). The MANet can include a netWork of
nodes (e.g., computers, phones, and other Wireless devices)
FIG. 4 illustrates an example of using the mobile device
that are near each other, but have no ?xed infrastructure. The
mobile device 100 may create a MANet by self-con?guring a
100 as a Wireless access point, such as a Wi-Fi or WiMax base
station and/ or a cellular access point. In the example shoWn,
60
a user can con?gure the mobile device 100 to be a portion of
a Wireless distribution system for various Wireless devices or
clients, such as laptops, other phones, PDAs, etc. For
example, the mobile device 100 can be con?gured as a Wire
less base station for providing netWork connectivity or Inter
net access. As such, mobile device 100 can extend netWork
401 connectivity to other Wireless devices. In some imple
65
netWork of mobile routers (and associated hosts) connected
by Wireless links. Upon con?guration, the netWork of mobile
routers may form an arbitrary topology. Such a netWork may
operate in a standalone fashion Where the mobile device 100
is the base station and other Wireless devices connect through
the mobile device 100 over the MANet.
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 may be
used to employ a vehicular ad hoc netWork (VANet). VANets
US 8,463,238 B2
10
For example, the mobile device 100 may automatically bind
may generally operate as a MANet used for communication
among vehicles and between vehicles and roadside equip
an in-range laptop device to one or more netWorks hosted on
ment.
the device 100, such as netWork 401.
In some implementations, the device 100 may receive net
Work access requests from external Wireless devices (506).
For example, a PDA user may request Internet access from
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 can func
tion as an extension of an existing Wi-Fi network. In some
implementations, the mobile device 100 can function as an
device 100 to doWnload driving directions. In operation, the
extension of a Wired internet service connection. For
example, the mobile device 100 can be a Wireless router that
enables Wireless connectivity in a home or business setting.
In some implementations, the mobile device 100 includes
a native function, for example as a mobile phone, Which is
con?gured to include a Wireless access point.
mobile device 100 (con?gured as a Wireless base station) can
accept connection requests from Wireless devices and deter
mine Whether a particular Wireless device can gain access to
the netWork 401. The connection requests may be examined
by the mobile device 100. For example, the mobile device 100
can optionally perform authentication tasks for Wireless users
before alloWing them on the Wireless netWork (508).
The optional authentication tasks can be performed using
Con?guring a Mobile Device for Base Station
Operation
access protocols such as WEP, Wi-Fi Protected Access
FIG. 5 illustrates an example process 500 for providing
Wireless base station functionality using a mobile device. In
some implementations, the method 500 can be used With
con?guration 200, as described in reference to FIG. 2. Gen
(WPA), WPA2, and others. The authentication may include
accessing a requester’s (e. g., Wireless user’ s) credentials,
validating the credentials, and accepting or rejecting the user
20 based on those credentials. In some implementations, a mes
erally, the process 500 includes con?guration, authentication,
and an optional lock doWn process.
The process 500 begins When a mobile user (device 100)
selects the settings object 152 to enter a mobile device setup
screen (502). Alternatively, the mobile device setup screen
can be invoked automatically by an authorized external
device, such as a laptop or other Wireless device. For example,
sage may be sent to the user alloWing or disalloWing the user’ s
device access to the Wireless netWork. In some implementa
25
cess can make use of one or more standard passWords to gain
access to the Wireless netWork using device 100. In other
implementations, the Wireless device 100 may operate in a
a mobile device user may precon?gure a connection betWeen
a selected device (e.g., the user’s laptop) and device 100. As
such, the mobile device 100 may recogniZe the device and
automatically enable a base station con?guration.
In the event that the mobile device/base station has not been
precon?gured, the user can employ the setup screen. Accord
ingly, the setup screen can be used for con?guring the mobile
device 100 to operate as a base station (504). For example, the
shared mode. The shared mode can alloW users to share a
30
35
point information, security protocols, netWork rules, and
tations, further information can be provided. In other imple
40
a desired base station con?guration. When the input is
mentations, the denial may occur, but messages may not be
sent to the requesting device.
If device 100 determines access can be granted to any or all
requesting devices, access to the Wireless netWork 401 can be
received, a con?guration service on device 100 can install the
speci?ed con?guration information to the device 100.
provided (510). The device 100 can automatically present
45
information in a requesting device’s screen before, during,
and after netWork initialization. For example, a message may
be presented to a requesting device user including help,
update information, instructions, speci?c advertising, or
used as a Wi-Fi base station at home or in another location.
For example, the device 100 can be con?gured differently for
home usage than for travel usage.
In some implementations, the device 100 can perform a
search for available netWorks. For example, the user may
can determine Whether netWork access is granted to one or
more requesting devices. If access is denied for one or more
devices, the device 100 can send a message to the requesting
device indicating access has been denied. In some implemen
presented With a set-up dialog for providing input specifying
In some implementations, the con?guration can also
include selecting a “home” setting or an “aWay” setting. The
settings can be used to indicate Whether the device is being
common passWord or “key.” For example, When using WPA
for accessing the device 100, a “pre-shared key” (PSK) can be
used to authenticate and grant access to requesting users.
Other methods are possible.
Upon examination of access requests, mobile device 100
user may use the setup screen to set up user accounts, access
other connection details. In some implementations, the con
?guration can include multiple netWork access set-up as Well
as client device set-up. In some implementations, the user is
tions, the connection may occur automatically upon accep
tance of a particular user’s credentials.
In some implementations, the optional authentication pro
50
other relevant information. In some implementations, the
device 100 may present further information to a requesting
device user. For example, device 100 may present a particular
Web address or other netWork resource upon netWork initial
select a search object in the setup screen to search for some or
iZation and/or connection. In another example, the device 1 00
all available netWorks. The available netWorks may be dis
played for selection. As such, the user may select and/or
may direct a client processing system on a netWork to a
55 particular volume on a ?le server upon netWork initialiZation.
As discussed above in FIG. 3, upon connecting to the
connect to one or more of the displayed netWorks.
Wireless device 100 (i.e., the netWork), graphical representa
In general, When a neW device is recogniZed, the mobile
device can extract communication information about proto
cols and external netWork addresses, for example. In some
implementations, the netWork details can then be con?gured
automatically based on the information extracted. In some
tions (e.g., icons) can be presented Within device 100 that
indicate other devices are connected to the device. In some
implementations, netWorking display objects indicating a
signal strength can be presented in the Wireless devices con
implementations, manual netWork set-up procedures may be
nected to device 100.
In some implementations, providing access to a Wireless
device can include setting up and tearing doWn a secure
performed using Wired or Wireless means.
In some implementations, the con?guration may include
searching for other devices in the vicinity of the mobile device
100. If other devices are discovered, the mobile device 100
may automatically bind these devices to a particular netWork.
65
communication session (e.g., SSL session) for the requesting
device, as described in Us. patent application Ser. No.
11/767, 447, “Device Activation and Access,” ?led Jun. 22,
US 8,463,238 B2
11
12
2007. In this implementation, the mobile device 100 can setup
a secure communication session With the requesting device
and With the Wireless network for Which access has been
can be Written in any form of programming language (e.g.,
Objective-C, Java), including compiled or interpreted lan
guages, and it can be deployed in any form, including as a
stand-alone program or as a module, component, subroutine,
requested.
or other unit suitable for use in a computing environment.
Suitable processors for the execution of a program of
After granting netWork access to one or more Wireless
devices, device 100 may be con?gured to automatically
refuse further access to other devices (e.g., a “lockdoWn”)
(512). A lockdoWn can include any method by Which access
instructions include, by Way of example, both general and
to a particular netWork resource is denied or locked based
upon authentication of a user, a device, or other policy or rule
one of multiple processors or cores, of any kind of computer.
Generally, a processor Will receive instructions and data from
compliancy.
a read-only memory or a random access memory or both. The
special purpose microprocessors, and the sole processor or
various reasons, including but not limited to various trigger
essential elements of a computer are a processor for executing
instructions and one or more memories for storing instruc
events. For example, a user can con?gure a lockdoWn to occur
tions and data. Generally, a computer Will also include, or be
after a particular number of users connect (e.g., to save net
operatively coupled to communicate With, one or more mass
In general, a user can con?gure a lockdoWn to occur for
Work throughput or bandWidth). As another example, a lock
storage devices for storing data ?les; such devices include
doWn can refer to a locking of one or more portions of the
magnetic disks, such as internal hard disks and removable
netWork, such that the lockdoWn protects sensitive informa
disks; magneto-optical disks; and optical disks. Storage
devices suitable for tangibly embodying computer program
tion, such as banking records or passWords on the device 100.
Accordingly, the lockdoWn may be placed on speci?c ?les
and/or netWork available documents, but still enable other
20
memory, including by Way of example semiconductor
devices to connect to the Wi-Fi connection through device
100.
memory devices, such as EPROM, EEPROM, and ?ash
memory devices; magnetic disks such as internal hard disks
and removable disks; magneto-optical disks; and CD-ROM
In some implementations, a user can con?gure a lockdoWn
to protect the netWork from intruders and to prevent exposure,
fraud or abuse. For example, device 100 can be con?gured to
instructions and data include all forms of non-volatile
25
and DVD-ROM disks. The processor and the memory can be
supplemented by, or incorporated in, ASICs (application
speci?c integrated circuits).
lock doWn When an external device accesses the netWork
Without permission. In this case, further netWork access to the
To provide for interaction With a user, the features can be
implemented on a computer having a display device such as a
offending device and other requesting devices may be denied
until a user of device 100 unlocks the netWork access. Other 30
CRT (cathode ray tube) or LCD (liquid crystal display) moni
lockdoWn scenarios are possible.
tor for displaying information to the user and a keyboard and
a pointing device such as a mouse or a trackball by Which the
user can provide input to the computer.
The features can be implemented in a computer system that
In some implementations, a user can con?gure a lockdoWn
to occur based on the current geographic location of the
mobile device 100, or proximity of the device 100 to particu
lar locations (e.g., competing businesses). For example, the
35
includes a back-end component, such as a data server, or that
user could specify that the device cannot be used for netWork
access While the mobile device 100 is located in a particular
includes a middleWare component, such as an application
country.
ponent, such as a client computer having a graphical user
interface or an Internet broWser, or any combination of them.
In some implementations, a user can con?gure a lockdoWn
to occur based on time or distance. For example, the device
server or an Internet server, or that includes a front-end com
40
100 can lock doWn at certain times of day (e.g., after 6:00 PM)
or on certain days (e.g., Weekends). The device 100 can also
lockdoWn When Within a speci?ed distance (e.g., radius) of
speci?ed geographic locations or other netWorks (e.g., other
Wi-Fi netWorks).
nication netWork. Examples of communication netWorks
include, e. g., a LAN, a WAN, and the computers and netWorks
forming the Internet.
45
In some implementations, netWork access through the
device 100 is alloWed for certain speci?ed (e.g., user-speci
50
addition to, requesting passWords, keys or other security
information.
55
patent application Ser. No. 11/767,447, for “Device Activa
tion and Access,” ?led Jun. 22, 2007.
The described features can be implemented advanta
geously in one or more computer programs that are execut
60
grammable processor coupled to receive data and instructions
components may be added to, or removed from, the described
What is claimed is:
1. A mobile device comprising:
from, and to transmit data and instructions to, a data storage
system, at least one input device, and at least one output
device. A computer program is a set of instructions that can be
mentations may be combined, deleted, modi?ed, or supple
mented to form further implementations. As yet another
example, the logic ?oWs depicted in the ?gures do not require
the particular order shoWn, or sequential order, to achieve
desirable results. In addition, other steps may be provided, or
steps may be eliminated, from the described ?oWs, and other
systems. Accordingly, other implementations are Within the
scope of the folloWing claims.
able on a programmable system including at least one pro
used, directly or indirectly, in a computer to perform a certain
activity or bring about a certain result. A computer program
on the respective computers and having a client-server rela
tionship to each other.
A number of implementations have been described. Nev
ertheless, it Will be understood that various modi?cations
may be made. For example, elements of one or more imple
In some implementations, all remote access requests are
received by security process, Which sets up and tears doWn a
secure communication sessions (e.g., Secure Socket Layer
(SSL). An example of such a process is described in US.
The computer system can include clients and servers. A
client and server are generally remote from each other and
typically interact through a netWork. The relationship of cli
ent and server arises by virtue of computer programs running
?ed) machine addresses or other unique identi?ers (e.g., a
MAC address). For example, a user may only Want to alloW
netWork access to their notebook computer, instead of, or in
The components of the system can be connected by any form
or medium of digital data communication such as a commu
65
a processor;
a storage device coupled to the processor and having
instructions stored thereon, Which, When executed by
US 8,463,238 B2
14
13
11. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the mobile device
the processor, causes the processor to con?gure the
includes a ?rst native function as a phone and Where the
mobile device is further con?gured to be an access point.
12. The mobile device of claim 1, Wherein the mobile
device is locked doWn based on the number of devices cur
mobile device to be an access point for a Wireless net
Work; and
a communication interface coupled to the processor and
operable for receiving an access request from a ?rst
rently coupled to the Wireless netWork through the mobile
requesting device, and for coupling the ?rst requesting
device.
13. The mobile device of claim 1, Wherein the mobile
device is locked doWn based on the location of the mobile
device.
14. The mobile device of claim 1, Wherein the mobile
device is locked doWn based on the time of the access request.
device to the Wireless netWork in response to the access
request;
Where the instructions, When executed by the processor, are
further operable to cause the processor to lock doWn the
mobile device to prevent access to the Wireless netWork
by a second requesting device based on a number of
15. A method comprising:
devices currently coupled to the Wireless netWork
con?guring a mobile device to be an access point for a
through the mobile device, based on a location of the
Wireless network;
mobile device, or based on a time of the access request.
receiving, at the mobile device, an access request from a
2. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the mobile device
includes a multi-touch-sensitive display.
3. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the mobile device
?rst requesting device;
coupling, by the mobile device, the ?rst requesting device
to the Wireless netWork in response to the access request;
includes a telephony application.
4. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the Wireless net
20
Work is a cellular network.
5. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the processor is
operable to authenticate the requesting device.
6. The mobile device of claim 5, Where the requesting
device is authenticated using one from the group of Wireless
25
16. The method of claim 15, further comprising:
(WEP), Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA) or WPA2.
7. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the processor is
authenticating the requesting device.
17. The method of claim 15, further comprising:
operable to set up a secure communication session for the
8. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the Wireless net
Work is from a group of Wireless netWorks consisting of
Wireless local area netWorks (WLAN), Bluetooth® netWorks,
radio access netWorks (RANs), metropolitan area netWorks
(MANs), Wide area netWorks (WANs), mobile ad-hoc net
Works (MANets) or mobile phone netWorks.
9. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the processor is
operable to search for available Wireless netWorks in a vicin
ity of the mobile device.
10. The mobile device of claim 1, Where the mobile device
30
ing device.
comprises:
35
searching for the Wireless netWork in a vicinity of the
mobile device; and if a netWork is available,
con?guring the mobile device to be an access point for the
Wireless netWork.
19. The method of claim 15, Where con?guring the mobile
device further comprises:
40
con?guring the mobile device as a base station at home or
in another location, Where the mobile device can be
con?gured in a ?rst user-settable con?guration With one
or more ?rst netWork settings at home and con?gured in
can be con?gured as a base station at home or in another
user-settable con?guration With one or more ?rst netWork
a second user-settable con?guration With one or more
settings at home and con?gured in a second user-settable
another location, and Where the ?rst and second user-settable
con?gurations can be simultaneously stored in the storage
device.
setting up a secure communication session for the request
18. The method of claim 15, Where con?guring further
location, Where the mobile device can be con?gured in a ?rst
con?guration With one or more second netWork settings in
of the mobile device, or based on a time of the access
request.
security protocols consisting of: Wired equivalent privacy
requesting device.
and
locking doWn the mobile device to prevent access to the
Wireless netWork by a second requesting device based on
a number of devices currently coupled to the Wireless
netWork through the mobile device, based on a location
45
second netWork settings in another location, and Where
the ?rst and second user-settable con?gurations can be
simultaneously stored in the storage device.
*
*
*
*
*